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msquared posted African-American Male perception on the Chile forum on March 30, 2015:
I am African American, 25 years old, college senior (bachelors in English Writing and Spanish from Indiana University) with a published book and plenty of experience in office jobs under my belt. I am planning to move to Santiago in May in hopes of finding a job. I had a GREAT trip in January in Santiago for two weeks. However, I cannot find anywhere on how I (as an educated black male) might be perceived looking for professional work in Santiago, which obviously did not have lots of blacks. Can anyone (regardless of race) give me ANY insight? ANYTHING? Even if it is second-hand (what you've heard.) I LOVED SANTIAGO.
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iain initially posted:
hi all, I live in the UK, and have worked in the airline industry for 32 years. I've just received an insurance payout which I want to use to launch a new life. Here in the UK we've been subjected to the most grotesque chemtrails imaginable for the last at least 4 years. Almost every day - Winter, Spring, Summer and Autumn - there are massive spreading, dripping, all-day plumes of white muck from non-CAA aircraft, presumed NATO. If you're flying anywhere from 25,000' to 38,000' you can see them as soon as you arrive over the UK. In fact the trails at that height can actually be seen to congeal and drip over vast distances. It's appalling. The government pretends not to know, but they would have to be cretins not to realise what's going on. Does Ecuador have chemtrails, and is the government really free of the war machine, false-flag, arms business mentality which pervades the UK and US? I was staggered to see that Cameron never criticised Israel for slaughtering more than two thousand civilians last Summer. That was really the last straw. I would arrive in Ecuador with just under a million dollars (US) liquidity and would like to spend my last 10 or 15 years of life there. Any advice would be most welcome - language, people, culture, lifestyle - anything at all from your experience! Many thanks
Picareno replied on March 27, 2015 with:
Greetings all. We've been really taking our time (and unfortunately, our money,) to try to ensure that we end up in the right place for us. We had originally jaunted off to Belize, I think bouyed by all those travel channel shows. We visited sustainable communities, upscale communities, villages and towns and met with a number of realtors. Bottom line was that we both needed more reliable infrastructure, especially during their wet season. What a disappointment and an end to a dream. But what's happened is that we've really honed our list of realistic and very personal needs. Case in point: I'm not the Earth Mother I thought I was (grad of U.C. Berkeley- yikes), so we're now looking for countries with better infrastructure, as well as stable economies. So far, we've loved both Chile and Uruguay. Chile is not a "free" country and is, in fact, more bureaucratic than the USA, if you can imagine. BUT, They're also more efficient, hence their very high rating. Uruguay is not quite as efficient, but much friendlier and "down to earth." with a stable economy, as well. We loved them both and I expect our choice will be one of these two. We are off to Nicaragua, but I think the heat and poverty (not a huge middle class there) will take it off the list. Anyway, I guess I'm just saying that if you have the time...and money (gulp) visiting and doing due diligence (not just blogging, folks) can keep you from making life-altering mistakes. Good luck to us all!
Picareno replied on March 27, 2015 with:
Guys, please understand that the myth of running away to a foreign land and expecting that land to sanction any income from employment or, worse still, investment interest, is a myth...at least for US citizens. We've been researching this dream. The "Foreign Accounts and Tax Complicance Act (FATCA), requires foreign banks to report the incomes of US citizens to the IRS, or incur a penalty themselves. So, in theory, if you can find a bank that will "hide" your income, you will probably need to pay them to cover the penalty if it is levied. An excellent article explaining all this has just been simplified and published at http://finance.yahoo.com/news/non-us-residents-abroad-must-file-income-taxes-195444214.html. Once you drop your US citizenship, this obviously changes your connection to the USA. But, PLEASE research this and two other laws before you skip off to Never-Never-Land. If avoiding taxes is your goal, you may wish to rethink why you are expatriating. Good luck.
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Cradler replied to the thread Networking Opportunities for Teachers on the Chile forum on March 23, 2015:
NRP initially posted:
I am an ESL teacher in Santiago looking for networking opportunities. Where can I find some gatherings, lectures, or seminars where there might be other ESL professionals or people working in education?
Cradler replied on March 23, 2015 with:
Hi NRP, I have only been in Santiago since March 4, but I would also love to find networking opportunities in our field.
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drmicrochp replied to the thread Classified Websites on the Chile forum:
Guerrillagreg initially posted:
What are the best Chile classifieds websites to look at for employment, housing, etc..?
drmicrochp replied most recently with:
These are the best chilean websites for finding a job. www.yapo.cl http://empleo.trovit.cl/ http://www.indeed.cl/ http://cl.jobrapido.com/ http://www.pagepersonnel.cl/ http://www.laborum.cl/ http://www.trabajando.cl
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The Chilean phone system has been so confusing to me. If you see a phone number posted on the internet, it so rarely can be dialed the way that you see it. Some rules that I have come across (correct me if I'm wrong). 1. All cell phone numbers called from a land line need to have a 9 or a 09 dialed in front of the rest of the number. 2. All land lines dialed from a cell phone need to have the regional area code dialed in front of the number. 3. Cell phone to cell phone numbers may be dialed directly (eight digits) without any extra area code prefixes. 4. All cell phones in chile are considered to have a 9 or 09 prefix regardless of the region where the phone is geographically. 5. If the area code (for a land line number) has a one digit number you have to put a 0 in front of it. Some area codes have two digits and you still have to put a 0 in front of the two digits for it to work. 6. A lot of the phone numbers published on the internet for chile will not work as it because the web page is old and needs to be updated. The numbers may be "almost" correct, but you might have to add a number. For example a seven digit number needs to have 0 or some other digit in front of it. The new telephone numbering system changed the rules for acceptable numbers recently and all the old numbers need to be "tweaked" by adding extra digits before they will work. 7. Although the country code is 56 you don't ever include those digits when dialing here. If you ever stumble upon a better guide to understanding the phone numbers and how to dial them, please post here.
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Blog An Aussie in Chile posted on the Chile Network
The cultural insights of a young woman who moved to Santiago Chile to explore and learn.
panamajames replied to the thread looking for land partners on the Chile forum:
artbyjoe initially posted:
wanting to buy self sufficient farming land in south western Chile. west of Los Muermos. we figure to be part time for the first 3 years or so. perhaps 6 mo / 6 mo. then full time. primary goal is to grow as much of our own food as possible. have experience in off grid living. we will be heading back down there in March for 4 to 6 weeks.
panamajames replied most recently with:
I just got back from Chile and found the farming to be incredible. I would not want to be in competition
ruthoneill replied most recently with:
I like the idea of fertile land, plentiful water and autonomy within a like minded community. I do not want to be too close to my neighbors as I am tired of that living in suburbia. Having university nearby and services and infrastucture is important to me as I have several children. Otherwise I prefer myear round growing season and with enough elevation to get a breeze preferably on east side coastal mountains near to beach.
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captainsursea replied to the thread vets and MAC flights on the Chile forum:
RussellO initially posted:
I'm looking for those who use this service to travel around South America. Where in the U.S. do you leave from for flights?
captainsursea replied most recently with:
There is no such thing as a MAC flight (Military Airlift Command) any more; the agency is now AMC (Air Mobility Command). The correct name for what you want is a space A Flight. Call the AMC at 951-655-2397 to inquire about the flights, destinations and eligibility requirements.
captainsursea replied most recently with:
There is no such thing as a MAC flight (Military Airlift Command) any more; the agency is now AMC (Air Mobility Command). The correct name for what you want is a space A Flight. Call the AMC at 951-655-2397 to inquire about the flights, destinations and eligibility requirements.
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captainsursea replied to the thread drivers license info? on the Chile forum:
sailormex initially posted:
Hi, I have had enough of Panamá and am moving to Chile, but my license is about to expire. Can someone tell me if I can get a license on a tourist visa before I file for residency? Many thanks..
captainsursea replied most recently with:
Short answer - No. The requirements for a Chilean driver's license is a Resident Visa, a RUT (similar to a S/S number) and a minimum 8th grade education certificate, notarized, from your junior high school, or high school, certified by the Chilean Consulate as an authentic document.
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