Argentina Expat Forum - Moving to Mendoza

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CactusEd
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7/3/2011 23:42    
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Greetings,

My wife and I are planning on moving to the Mendoza area in October, and would love to hear any helpful thoughts/information on best areas to live; typical cost of living (1-bed apt) and insight on renting, health care, Spanish classes, etc. We live pretty simply in the US., no cell phones or T.V., and would like to do so in Mendoza, though will need internet access to work.

Thank you for taking the time to read and respond! Have a fantastic day!

TomP
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7/4/2011 13:42    
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Cactus Ed,

My wife and I have lived in Mendoza for almost three years and we love it.

If you can give an idea of how big a place, e.g. 1 bed 1 bath or 2 bed 2 bath etc. and a budget that will tell me what to suggest.

Also how long you want to stay is important because most places where you rent 6 months or longer want a Lease and often an Argentine Guarantor for the Lease. This is true even if you offer to pay the entire Lease up front. There are exceptions but it is worth mentioning.

Spanish classes are easy and can range for a few dollars to US$20.00 per hour.

The cost and availability of Health Care depends on your age. If you are older, 62+, it can be expensive.

Sincerely,

Tom Pherlan

CactusEd
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7/4/2011 14:22    
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Hi Tom,

Thank you for your reply. It's good to hear that you both are enjoying your time in Mendoza. I was in BsBa for the summer a few years ago, and now being married, loving the mtns & vino, think that Mendoza would be perfect for us. We currently live in Boulder, Co which has a similar climate to Mendoza I believe.
We are in our mid 30's, and looking for a simple 1 bed/1bath in a convenient & safe location. As for duration, we don't know, though have committed to 1 year (not sure about the visa situation beyond exiting every 3 months). Of course this doesn't have to be in one place, but moving constantly is not fun. My brother and his family (2 kids, 3 & 4 years old) are moving down around the same time, though they are not sure where they will settle, but it will be nice to have them close in a new country.
As for budget, I was hoping to pay less for rent in Mendoza then in Colorado. We pay like $900 plus $100 for electic/ $80 water/$40 internet. In general, we won't have many additional expenses other than food, Spanish lessons, health care, public transport and fun money (hiking, tango perhaps), so I am mainly trying to get a better idea of daily living expenses though I understand this can vary greatly in terms of lifestyle.
I work remotely and make USD and my wife may take some online classes, teach English, or maybe even look into counseling expats (we both have master's degrees in counseling psychology. We have some savings that can help with rent-up-front costs.
We don't like crazy busy or stay out all night partying, and prefer making contact with locals & expats, finding ways to get involved in the community, outdoor & local travel, learning Spanish, and a little vino.

Any thoughts and insight would be fantastic!

Warm Wishes, Dan Panzarella

TomP
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7/5/2011 15:16    
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Ed,

I have answered your questions in blue. Feel free to ask more.

Sincerely,

Tom

Hi Tom,

Thank you for your reply. It's good to hear that you both are enjoying your time in Mendoza. I was in BsBa for the summer a few years ago, and now being married, loving the mtns & vino, think that Mendoza would be perfect for us.

We currently live in Boulder, Co which has a similar climate to Mendoza I believe.

We had friends in Boulder but they split up and the wife took off for the Yucatan area, Merida.
It probably gets colder in Boulder and the winters longer. We used to livce in Colorado and joked about how the winter can be seven to eight months long.

We are in our mid 30's, and looking for a simple 1 bed/1bath in a convenient & safe location.

Mendoza is relatively safe and I think awareness and attitude have a lot to do with it. For example you don’t walk down the street at night counting your money.

As for duration, we don't know, though have committed to 1 year (not sure about the visa situation beyond exiting every 3 months). Of course this doesn't have to be in one place, but moving constantly is not fun.

We are applying for “residency” but it takes time. Your Visa is good for 90 days and for the first year you can travel every 90 days 250 miles to Santiago, Chile by Bus (6.5 hours one way) or fly (40 minutes one way).

Or you can go to Buenos Aires (650 miles) by Bus or Plane and jump on a Ferry to Uruguay (2 hours or so one way).

My brother and his family (2 kids, 3 & 4 years old) are moving down around the same time, though they are not sure where they will settle, but it will be nice to have them close in a new country.

With respect Barilloche is akin to some denizens of Boulder regarding a fair representation of “Tree Hugger” types. Mendoza and San Rafael (2.5 hour drive one way south of Mendoza) is all about wine. We purchased 108 acres in San Rafael and planted 50 acres of Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Chardonnay two years ago.

As for budget, I was hoping to pay less for rent in Mendoza then in Colorado. We pay like $900 plus $100 for electic/ $80 water/$40 internet.

We rent a very lovely 2 bedroom 3 bath 11th Floor Condo with magnificent views for USA$1,500 monthly. You can find places for less and everything is relative and “$900 plus $100 for electic/ $80 water/$40 internet” is possible.

Here is the email (secretary@mendozaexpats.org) and web site (www.mendozaexpats.org) for the Mendoza Ex-Pat Club. It has about 400 Members, some Europeans but mostly Americans. You can ask if anyone will be putting up for rent a home or Condo or Apartment in the time frame you need.

In general, we won't have many additional expenses other than food, Spanish lessons, health care, public transport and fun money (hiking, tango perhaps), so I am mainly trying to get a better idea of daily living expenses though I understand this can vary greatly in terms of lifestyle.

Naturally speaking Spanish is a huge plus. Admittedly I speak very little Spanish but my wife is fluent is Spanish and French.

Finding a job here without being fluent in Spanish is very tough. And most jobs pay a pittance of what they would in the USA. For example:

1. Vineyard Worker earns US$650 - $750 monthly. Yes, monthly.
2. Waitress/Sales Clerk earns US$650 - $750 monthly.
3. Architect, Engineer etc. earns US$1,000 - $1,500 monthly.
4. Lawyer, Doctor earns US$2,500 - $4,000 monthly.

That is why you come over here with a retirement income, savings or money to invest in an enterprise that will generate income.

I work remotely and make USD and my wife may take some online classes, teach English, or maybe even look into counseling expats (we both have master's degrees in counseling psychology. We have some savings that can help with rent-up-front costs.

We don't like crazy busy or stay out all night partying, and prefer making contact with locals & expats, finding ways to get involved in the community, outdoor & local travel, learning Spanish, and a little vino.

Any thoughts and insight would be fantastic!

Warm Wishes, Dan Panzarella

CactusEd
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7/5/2011 18:45    
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Hi Tom,

Thank you for your notes and thoughts. Sounds like you really like Mendoza. How are your grapes coming along?
Thank you for the expat resources also. I will be sure to contact them.
I had a few other questions if you don't mind, and would be most grateful.
1. How do you handle money. For example, I don't really want and Argentine bank (have not heard good things about them), so I am curious how you deal with paying your rent and other larger things where ATM is not really an option.
2. If you can only travel outside ARG every 90 days for the first year, what have you done since while waiting for residency?
3. Who do you have health insurance with, and would you recommend them?
4. Are you aware of private or bilingual schools (this is more for my brother's kids (3 & 4 years old).
5. Finally, what do you enjoy most & what is most challenging in Argentina?

Thank you again Tom, and have a spectacular evening,
Dan

TomP
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7/6/2011 07:56    
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Cactus Ed,

Here are more answers.

July 6, 2011

How are your grapes coming along?

ANSWER: We had our first mini harvest last March when the newly planted vines were only 18 months old. We yielded about 10,000 kgs.

Thank you for the expat resources also. I will be sure to contact them. I had a few other questions if you don't mind, and would be most grateful.

1. How do you handle money. For example, I don't really want and Argentine bank (have not heard good things about them), so I am curious how you deal with paying your rent and other larger things where ATM is not really an option.

ANSWER: Most Argentines do not trust their Banks but this skepticism is in direct proportion to one’s concept of wealth. For example many professional people use Bank Nacional as we do and keep $10,000 or more in the bank but not huge sums.
People with a lot of money will buy land.

ATMs are an option and everywhere. We use them all of the time as do people visiting us. The caution about using an ATM is when and where. We only use ATMs located inside a Bank and during the day. And we look for “Spotters” or people who hang around to see if anyone is withdrawing a lot of money and alone.

Also, most businesses accept VISA and MASTER CARD.

2. If you can only travel outside ARG every 90 days for the first year, what have you done since while waiting for residency?

ANSWER: Not sure I understand the question. If you are asking where have we visited during the last three years our answer is we return to the USA every year, often twice, to visit children and grandchildren and relatives in New York City, Dallas, Los Angeles and San Francisco. And we own property in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico where we visit every year. We have been so busy with La Vida Buena we have not really seen much of Argentina but that will change this year.

3. Who do you have health insurance with, and would you recommend them?

ANSWER: A good question and the blunt answer is we don’t have Health Insurance here in Argentina. We are looking for affordable coverage but we both have Medicaid in the USA. When you are over I believe age 62, which we are, Argentine Health Insurance can be pricy. We have never had the need to visit a doctor in our three years.

4. Are you aware of private or bilingual schools (this is more for my brother's kids (3 & 4 years old).

ANSWER: Another good question which I will have to do some research. Every foreigner we know places his or her children into a Spanish only school. I have yet to hear of a “Bi-lingual School”. You would be amazed how quickly children learn Spanish. Private schools are best but often have no room. However, public schools are far better here than most in the USA.

5. Finally, what do you enjoy most & what is most challenging in Argentina? Thank you again Tom, and have a spectacular evening, Dan

ANSWER: We have many friends, American, European and Argentine and we have a constant flow of friends visiting, for example, from the UK, Australia, Holland, France, Canada and so on.

We love the wine and vineyard industries and have only been to about 45 Bodegas (Wineries) with many yet to be discovered (there are about 1,500).

And we love to travel. We have not had a car for the three years but we will be acquiring one soon. In Mendoza we walk a lot and Taxis are very affordable, US$5.00 will get you most places. Cars in Argentina, even old beat up clunkers fetch top dollar (many thousands of dollars) because there is no financing of cars here. A new car will cost about 50% - 100% more than in the USA. We have friends that live here who bought a brand new Nissan Sentra and got a great deal, US$33,000. The same is true of mortgages, Argentina does not have a mortgage industry, and everyone owns his/her home free and clear. Wow, can you imagine that in the USA?

Probably the most challenging here is that Argentines are not service oriented ergo you often stand in long lines and wait to do your banking or pay a utility bill etc. And don’t expect great service in a restaurant unless it is a very high in place. Time moves more slower here and in Mendoza and San Rafael the siesta prevails, most businesses close from 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM and then reopen until 9:00 PM or 10:00 PM. Restaurants stay open much later and it is not uncommon to see an Argentine family with young children dining at 10:00 – 11:00 PM.

CactusEd
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7/9/2011 11:45    
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Hi Tom,

Thank you for your time and thoughtful replies - I have enjoyed reading about your experience and would love to connect when we settle in Mendoza in the October/Nov.

One final question my fiance wanted me to ask you, and that is around the frequency and ferocity of the earthquakes in the region.

Thanks again Tom, and have a fantastic weekend.

Warm Wishes,
Dan

TomP
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7/10/2011 07:52    
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Dan,

You raise a good question about earthquakes.

Having lived in Southern California for decades I am familiar with what one considers a large 8.0 earthquake.

We have lived in Mendoza full time for almost three years and on occasion we have felt very mild tremors except in March 2010.

We live in a 20 story Condo building. We woke up in the night by the swaying of the building. Most of the residents exited their Condos for an hour or so then returned. This was the earthquake that emanated from Chile and did all of the damage in Chile.

Besides that we have not experienced earthquakes.

Mendoza was severely damaged by an earthquake over a 100 years ago and because of subsequent much stricter building codes etc. it would probably take a major 8.0+ quake to do any damage to buildings now.

CactusEd
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7/13/2011 12:07    
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Hi Tom,

Thank you for all of your help and insight. Moving to a new country is both very exciting, and unknown. To hear your experience and thoughts makes the unknown a litlte less scary and we are grateful that you have taken time to write us back. I'd love to conect when we settle in Mendoza and see what you have been building over there in grapes and life, if you have time/interest.

Warmly,
Dan

SaintJohn
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8/17/2011 18:12    
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>I was in BsBa for the summer a few years ago,

BsAs is a stinker compared to Mendoza. Here you'll find friendly and polite people, reasonably clean streets, only the very few will try to con you, most of Mendoza proper is safe. Easy to make friends (I have some 80 acquaintances & friends after slightly less than 3 years).

> a simple 1 bed/1bath in a convenient & safe location. As for duration, we don't know, though have committed to 1 year

Location is then either La Quinta sección or La Sexta or Cuatra Oeste, or maybe the better part of Godoy Cruz.

Expect to pay
Search here to get ideas: http://www.cocucci.com.ar/ - most expensive show up first - there are many more real estate companies.

My best advice is to join us in the English speaking group, every Wednesday at 22 in the bar ClaroOscuro, Arístides Villanueva near # 351 (between Olascoaga and Martinez de Rosas on the RH side when you come from Av. San Martín).
Lots of tips from expats and Mendocinos. This is where I found my present apartment, through a friend of a friend.

Rental contracts in Argentina are 2 years by law. You'll need a guarante (or two) which is usually a person who owns real estate. It is, however, possible to buy a guarantee (it's an insurance), which is accepted by many. Clara, my real estate specialist lawyer, can help you there. Expect at least one month (and only in case of a miracle) before you can get an ordinary contract - these things take time.

If you are staying shorter than 2 years, a temporary rental is usually your only option.

When you arrive it is a good idea to get a temporary rental, a tourist apartment, much cheaper than hotel and you'll have your own kitchen, which can save a bunch.

I can recommend Ramón Moll (tell him you know John): Departamentos Peatonal-Independencia, http://www.mendozatravel.com/departamentos_peatonalindependencia.asp

Others: http://www.mendozatravel.com/departamentos.asp

>(not sure about the visa situation beyond exiting every 3 months).

You can have a 90 days extension of your tourist visa - some people will recommend it - but DO NOT get one, it will give you no end of problems. Instead you take the bus to Valparaíso (beautiful town, a must see) or neighbouring Viña del Mar, 7-9 hours each way, US$ 70-80 return each person in comfortable cama or 50 in incomfortable semi-cama, or by plane to Santiago, 4-5 hours each way (international flight - show up 2 hours before take-off, then fly 45 minutes, half hour in immigration and another half hour in taxi to Santiago) and around US$ 200 return each person.

>As for budget, I was hoping to pay less for rent in Mendoza then in Colorado. We pay like $900 plus $100 for electic/ $80 water/$40 internet.

Nice 1 br. apartment from around US$ 500 (less through a friend - in a 3-storey house I have 2 storeys 124 sq.meter (1,350 sq.ft.) + patio + large roof terrace for US$ 450, but rented from a friend of a friend and paying a year in advance, no need for a guarante). In addition expect 100-400 pesos in expenses (guards, porteros, etc.) in an ordinary apartment building. Add 200 pesos (US$ 50) a month for electricity, gas, water and municipality.


>I work remotely and make USD
Good.

> my wife may take some online classes, teach English,
If certified she may take in some 4-8 US$ an hour, preparations no pay, travel no pay.

> or maybe even look into counseling expats (we both have master's degrees in counseling psychology.
Probably not.

> We have some savings that can help with rent-up-front costs.
You'll need it.

> making contact with locals & expats, finding ways to get involved in the community, outdoor & local travel, learning Spanish, and a little vino.

ClaroOscuro mentioned above is a brilliant start.

For Spanish lessons I can recommend Ana Maria Troncoso, SIMA: Spanish in Mendoza Argentina, certified teacher, http://spanishinmendozaargentina.greenash.net.au/

All the best,
john

MendozaHomes
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8/17/2011 19:14    
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SaintJohn

I think your post is very important for expat people. You know, I read about meeting people and practice English and Spanish. Are you moving to this meeting?? Because I am looking for this meeting for long time. Because I would like to practice my English.
I hope you replay my question.
About properties for rent in Mendoza. I have an apartment for rent in Mendoza with one bedroom. You know I have a Real Estate Company in Mendoza, I know about different people rent in Quinta, Sexta and other areas, off course furnished.

Best for you

SaintJohn
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8/17/2011 21:14    
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I am not attending tonight (las anginas) but just pop in, say hello to everybody and find a seat - very leaned back group.

Hope to meet you next Wednesday.

Un abrazo,
John

diannaeco
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9/4/2011 19:56    
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Don't know when exactly. Need info about cost for retired COUPLE (income requirement). Also, we are both over 65 and will need to know about health care availability and costs. Additionally, we have a son who is a Computer Software Engineer and is interested in knowing about jobs in Mendoza or Buenos Aires. Thanks for your reply. Mike & Dianna

SaintJohn
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9/5/2011 01:01    
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Hi Mike & Dianna,

how much does a car cost? :-)

You need to be much more specific about your expectations, size and type of home, lower, middle or upper middle class life style and comfort, etc., etc.

Have you visited Argentina lately?
If not, you MUST come and see the country for a period of at least 2 months, or you may end up feeling trapped in a dream.
Expect a culture shock.

Remember: Not at home is NOT at home!

Now for the more practical part.

Note: AR$ is Argentino pesos, U$S is United States dollars.

As an introduction to home price levels I can tell that in Mendoza,

a good friend of mine living in his own house in the most attractive part of Mendoza (la Quinta Sección), living/dining room + 1 large and 4 small bedrooms + kitchen etc. + a small garden, house priced app. AR$ 600,000 = U$S 150,000, the family has 2 cars, and they live comfortably on AR$ 8,000 = U$S 2,000 a month.

My own apartment in la Quinta Sección is the 2 upper stories of a 3 storey house, 124 sq.meter = 1,330 sq.ft. living/dining room + 1 large + 1 small bedroom + kitchen, 1 bathroom + patio + a roof terrace of 72 sq.meter = 780 sq.ft., the rent per month in the next year is AR$ 2,000 (but should be 2,900, rented through a friend of a friend) + water, gas, electricity, community, internet, which totals AR$ 300, i.e. normally a total of AR$ 3,200 = U$S 800. In a nice, but less attractive section of town or in the suburbs we can find you a home for 4 persons at a total cost of app. AR$ 2,400 = U$S 600.

Search here to get an indication of current housing prices, buy or rent: http://www.cocucci.com.ar/

Note that it's impossible to rent a home without a 'guarante' (which may be bought as a kind of insurance) or payment in advance and that the normal rental period is settled by law to be 2 years - temporary rental exists but are more expensive.

Also, moving your furniture etc. to Argentina as an alien demands an import tax of app. 50 per cent of the insured value.

Rooms in a mendocino home are smaller than up north, because the climate allows us to sit outside 8 months a year

Beware of the high inflation rate of 20-28 per cent per year, which is not followed by the exchange rate - based on Euro the price of living has gone up by some 45 per cent during the last 3 years. This is expected to change after the election in October this year, which most think is the blocker for a devaluation of the AR$.

Health care in Argentina is "for free", i.e. financed through the taxes. It is middling good, almost all doctors are as competent as elsewhere, but equipment is somewhat behind what you find in the northern socalled "Western World", thus not excellent, except if you have a health insurance - but they'll never let you die in the street as it sometimes happens in the US.

Additional private health care is bought as an insurance and has a price scale, which - not surprisingly - is pretty steep when you are older than 65, it can almost as expensive as in the US, depending on e.g. pre-existing conditions, level of coverage, deductibles, etc.

As for your son, is he a civil (i.e. licensed) engineer or the English term "engineer"?

Whichever, his best option is to find a job working online in Europe or the US (I have several friends and acquantencies who do that), as wages are much lower in Argentina than in the "Western World"; a civil engineer with some 10 years of experience can expect to earn app. AR$ 7,000 = U$S 1,600 a month.

Homes and cost of living in general are quite a bit cheaper in Mendoza than in Buenos Aires.

A couple of warnings!

Do NOT buy or rent anything permanently from abroad and NEVER EVER pay in advance from your home country - if you just want to get rid of some money, send it to me :-)

You MUST be here (rent a tourist apartment) and get in touch with the local expats community to get local advice, before you buy or rent a home (saved me some AR$ 900 = U$S 220 a month).

Best regards,
St. John

TomP
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9/5/2011 07:32    
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Dear diasnnaeco,
First let me say that I believe you owe a heap of gratitude for St. John for taking the time to answer you questions objectively and accurately.
My wife and I (both in our sixties) moved from the USA in 2009 when we purchased 108 acres in San Rafael (2½ hour drive south of Mendoza) to build vineyards. I mention this only to illustrate that we did not come over looking for a job or living off of savings, pension etc. We were aggressively looking for a “Business Opportunity” and our vineyard project did just that. Luckily since we have been here the AR Peso has risen from AR 3.02 per 1 US Dollar to AR 4.20 per US Dollar. Because we have Social Security and all of our transactions are in US Dollars we have stayed ahead of inflation.
A couple of quick comments that might be helpful and St. John is absolutely right, don’t rent or buy without seeing the property. True, coming over here and living in a Hotel for a few weeks might be more expensive but not nearly as expensive as trying to get out of a bad lease or you’re in a bad area..
If you live in the heart of Mendoza as we do, a Condo on Belgrano near Plaza Italia, then you can get away without having a car. Taxis are no longer cheap unless you only travel a few blocks but then why not walk? Taxis to the outskirts of Mendoza City will run US$7.00 – US$10.00 each way.
We finally bought a new car and the experience was the same as when we looked for a Tractor for our vineyards. At first we pursued buying “Used” only to find out that used tractors and cars are outrageously priced. A 15 years old junker car here can fetch US$5,000. Our ex-pat friends paid US$33,000 for a brand new Nissan Sentra. We paid US$18,000 for a brand new Chevrolet 5 door mid size.
St. John hit the nail right on the head when he also asked what life style you expect when you get here. It is better to be candid that coy.
Our vineyard web site receives over 10,000 hits each month and I receive dozens of emails each month, most from Americans, who dream of coming over here. I encourage you to do so but visit first and when I say visit I do not mean spending two weeks at Bodegas enjoying the food and wine and then basing a decision on the premise that living here would be 365 days of wine and festivities.
I may have missed it but speaking Spanish is a huge plus and not speaking Spanish is a huge negative unless you just want to hang around with Gringo friends. I speak very little Spanish buy my wife is fluent and her skills have helped us too many times to mention.
I hope this helps and if you have any questions please feel free to ask.
Sincerely,
Tom and Yvonne Phelan
La Vida Buena Vineyards

SaintJohn
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9/5/2011 08:36    
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I forgot to mention

that my friend's family, who live comfortably on AR$ 8,000 = U$S 2,000 a month, are parents + three children in their early twenties, all three studying in one of the local universities, but living with their parents, which is common in Argentina.

that the normal rental period, which is settled by law to be 2 years is extendable by a year (or more) at a time if both parties agree. The rent is always increased in the second and following years, for the time being by some 20-25 per cent, because of the inflation.

that in Argentina connections, friends, are extremely important. They save you a bunch on home rental and when buying washing machine, fridge, aircon, etc. - you buy from a friend of a friend, and that also means better service, because there is a common friendship involved; you can ignore everybody else but risk "loosing face" if you fail a friend's friend.

When you come to stay for some time, rent a tourist apartment instead of staying in a hotel. It is not only cheaper (expect - off season - some AR$ 2,500-3,000 = U$S 600-750 a month for a livingroom + 1 bedroom + bath + kitchen + mucama (cleaning lady) twice a week in microcentro = midtown, downtown). Much more expensive in December, January and February - zillions of tourist here. The kitchen enables you to not only save quite a bit on food, but also give you a good idea of food prices.

Before you arrive, send me a PM (personal msg.) so I can arrange for you to meet some of the expats and Mendocinos who speak English (few do).

Best regards,
St.John

FrancisMTN
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11/4/2013 14:56    
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Hi, I was reading your conversation on the forum and thought I'd let you know about us moving back to the States for a year and a half.
We own a big house on a large property, rural style, but with all the accommodations. It is definitely a 'simple style' but very pretty. It is situated at about 20 minutes from the center of Mendoza and is surrounded by wineries and olive groves. As a matter of fact, it is right on the 'Ruta del Vino' (wine circuit).
We are asking for USD 600 a month and the utilities come up to not more than USD 200 a month. We could leave one of our cars for your use (you would have to pay the insurance fee and us a small rental fee).
We would prefer being paid directly to us in the US.

We have lived here for the last 14 years and have a group of friends who could help you out with all the details of daily living when you first arrive. We could point you to some interesting Spanish teachers, or show you the ropes, but being well surrounded by a dependable group is a must in our neck of the woods.

If you are interested, write me about it.

Eposternak
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11/4/2013 15:59    
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Please send me pic of the house, we may be interested.

christine3468
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11/6/2013 18:17    
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i there you said you live you and your familly with 8000pesos? is it enought to live corectly?
y husband an i are coming in january, his salary will be 10000 pesos but i was afraid to be too little
thanks

multmin
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10/7/2014 22:28    
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My wife and I, in our mid-60s, with our own Dallas-based business we plan to run from Mendoza, are flying in from Bariloche in the next 2 or 3 days, for an initial reconnaisance look at Mendoza, looking for a place to rent, and the many things we'll need to get set up in our life there.

Having lived in Mexico for 25 years, with a measure of proficiency in (Mexican) Spanish, we don't expect too much difficulty in adapting go life there.

Are you still in Mendoza?
Is your house still available to rent?
Or will it be available in coming months?

If you are still in Mendoza, would it be be possible to meet with you?
If not, with some of your expat or Argentinean friends?

Thank you.

multmin

MendozaHomes
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10/8/2014 10:09    
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Hi Multimin
I am a Real Estate Agent in Mendoza, and I have a lot of experience with expat here in Mendoza for rent and sell.
When you will be in Mendoza, I have for rent a house furnished and apartment in Quinta Sección, depending how long time I can offer. My recomendation is rent temporaly for short time, you explore the city and then rent anfurnished apartment. In general expat rent in quinta sección, downtown near to Belgrano Street, Sexta Sección and Chacras de Coria or Vistalba.
If you want information about expat you try to find in facebook MENDOZA EXPAT CLUB and other group of expat in facebook is MENDOZA EXPAT COMMUNITY, I am in this groups.
I have for rent an apartment and the owner is from US, maybe I can show you.
Good luck in your new city

TomP
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10/8/2014 10:55    
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My wife and I, in our mid-60s, with our own Dallas-based business we plan to run from Mendoza, are flying in from Bariloche in the next 2 or 3 days, for an initial reconnaisance look at Mendoza, looking for a place to rent, and the many things we'll need to get set up in our life there. Having lived in Mexico for 25 years, with a measure of proficiency in (Mexican) Spanish, we don't expect too much difficulty in adapting go life there. Are you still in Mendoza? Is your house still available to rent? Or will it be available in coming months? If you are still in Mendoza, would it be be possible to meet with you? If not, with some of your expat or Argentinean friends? Thank you. Multmin

It looks like you are on your way, I wish you the best of luck.

My wife and I lived in Mendoza for five years and return there every year In March/April en-route to San Rafafel where we have our vineyards.

I have listed below some one I have an very comfortable with and he knows the ins and outs of a gringo trying to rent someone. Below is his information. Tell him Tom says “Hello”

Leandro Suarez mendozahomes@gmail.com
Agente Inmobiliario Mat. 846
Tel: 261-4200303 - Cel 261-5863923 - US: +1(315)6364963

multmin
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10/8/2014 16:40    
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Tom,

Thanks for your reply. A great help! Have contacted him, and expect to hear back from him shortly.

For more private infromation exchange: multmin at runbox dot com.

Multmin

panamajames
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10/27/2014 13:42    
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I will be in Mendoza first part of January for a few weeks. Any recommendations of a place to stay. Local expat apartments, casitas, something nice, maybe with a swimming pool, hotel, motel, whatever..........we're not back packers, so we don't mind a little luxury..........seniors

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