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Hotjazzman replied to the thread How long is a type D visa good for? on the Hungary forum on September 02, 2014:
FeliciaOni initially posted:
My father and I plan on moving to Hungary summer of 2015 from USA. We are both USA citizens born in USA and no have no EU ties. When i talk to the embassy, they said we can apply for a type D visa while here in USA and then apply for the residence permit when we get to Hungary. Which is all good. What i am asking is once our visa to go to Hungary is approved from here in USA how long do we have to leave and show up in Hungary? I mean how long once it is approved is it good for? Like do you have 10 days or like 90 days to leave USA and be in Hungary before it becomes invalid? (that is what i heard so i am confused) I ask cause we wondered for planning purposes like for shipping of our stuff and things like that.
Hotjazzman replied 14 hours ago with:
No.
peddington replied on September 01, 2014 with:
Greetings, Not really sure about the "D" visa and the Hungarian Embassy would be the most appropriate to answer that-however even if you get here w/o one you allowed to stay for 90 days. If you submit the paperwork here for "residence", i.e. one year permit immigration is pretty good about making a decision in 28 days. (I know this from experience and I think it is by law). There are people here from all over including China, India and Africa so for most Westerners getting residency is not a problem as long as you prove an income you can live on, some type of health care coverage and you are not a wanted criminal. I personally do not know any Americans that where denied a residency permit if they met the basic requirements. Good luck! I'm sure "...jazzmo.." will share with you his comments of great wisdom also! LOL!
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peddington replied to the thread Friendliest city? A matter of opinion! on the Hungary forum on August 31, 2014:
peddington initially posted:
Budapest is the 10th friendliest city according to some travel guide! Well I suppose that is a matter of opinion. Another site on the internet doesn't even mention Budapest so I suppose any argument can be supported if you look in the right place. While Budapest "old" Buda side is very picturesque and it is rich with history, the Pest side not so much especially if you move away from the central area (near the Danube). Graffiti, trash and homeless is pretty much everywhere. Due to "human rights" which is another topic altogether, homeless is not required to move from door ways or metro steps. Hungarian food is great just find a place to park while you eat. You pay fro parking just about everywhere near the center of the city and by golly don't park illegally because your car will be "booted" and 15,000 forint and three hours later you may get the use of your car back. Public transportation is the way to go but ticket prices for one ride on the bus or metro is nearly about $1.40. This of course directed toward foreigners and those coming up from the country as most living in the capital city buy "passes". Incidentally the fine is advertised as 16,000 forint. Note of caution. You must validate a ticket on the bus and metro and sometimes these machines jam and don't work. Also some print a 2 mm line on the ticket you may not be able to see without glasses. Other's machines punch holes in the ticket so don't get the tickets mixed up. Incidentally if you rent a car and hit the Hungarian "autobahn" be careful. There are more radar traps then cops in Hungary. If you a foreigner they won't find you but your rental company will charge you no doubt. Thinking about fighting a ticket? Forget it! There is no such thing because in Hungary it is an "administrative fine" not directed toward the driver just toward the car which if the fine is not paid can be de-registered by the state. So have fun but remember you can be stopped by the police anytime there is no "cause" that has to be given. But fear not because that seldom happens as the police has a relatively small budget and have no money for gas. Therefore stationary radars and radar gates are used that are less expensive. Have fun while sightseeing but keep a wary eye on pick pockets. Is it as bad as Italy or France (in some places). NO but you should still keep your wallet or pocketbook close to you. The forint is low right now so your dollar, pound or euro will go far. Come visit and enjoy!
peddington replied on August 31, 2014 with:
Yes and DC is crazy about "gun control" also!
Hotjazzman replied on August 30, 2014 with:
Paddington, the only difference between 10 years ago and now in DC is, that EVERYTHING got a LOT worse. Back then a mugging in the NW was not a daily occurrence; today it is. Red light and non-stationary speed cameras increased by fivefold. Parking fees and tickets are astronomical. My 10 years ago experience was to illustrate, that even 10 years ago in DC was far worse than BUD is TODAY. Today, DC is unlivable by current(!) BUD standards.Public transportation is dismal. Crime is huge - we're talking about not theft, but MURDER. At the same time in liveable areas (by whites) especially the NW, is hideously expensive. You can live cheap(er) in the SE but if you're a white, the odds are, that you'll be dead or maimed in a year or less, be mugged at least once per month, burglarized every 2-3 months, and your car vandalized regularly.
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peddington replied to the thread Moving to Hungary on the Hungary forum on August 31, 2014:
padleys initially posted:
Hi, im new to this forum and at the moment living in Bulgaria, been here for 8 years now and have decided we need a change, been looking at Hungary and have liked what we have seen, could you help us with some facts like the cost of living an electric etc, and the places where not to look lol, thanks Sue
peddington replied on August 31, 2014 with:
Not really sure WHY someone would argue "semantics" like it is not a tax but VAT or it is not a visa but it is required for travel (unless you want to find your way back on the next plane) etc. It is the same "horse" by any other name. You should learn to read between the "lines"!
Hotjazzman replied on August 30, 2014 with:
COMPLETE Bulldung, Paddington. (The usual - of course) Google this: "Do Hungarians need a visa to the US?" The ESTA is a prepaid FEE for Customs, TSA and I think HLS. READ the requirements. All you need is a machine readable (electronic) Hungarian valid passport. You can be denied entry if you broke certain US emigration laws and therefore are prohibited to enter for a set period of time, and some other crime and conviction related issues. There will be no denial of entry if you are "CLEAN"; i.e. free of charges and convictions, or if not participating in some organization, which is connected or related to terrorism - that is as defined by the US.
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profray replied to the thread I left Hungary when I was 15, returning at age 65. on the Hungary forum:
ÖcsiJoe initially posted:
After the death of my father, my mother and I travelled through the "Iron Curtain" on Hungarian Passports to the amazement of machine gun toting military officer at the Budapesti Airport in January 1967. We were sponsored by my older brother who lived in Canada. I became a Canadian citizen, in 1998 I moved to the US and have lived in Phoenix, Arizona since. To take part in the election process I became a citizen of the US. I always prided myself saying "Magyar Vagyok, Magyarnak Születtem " in the belief that I maintained my Hungarian Citizenship. Does anyone know if I am still a Hungarian citizen ? This was my FIRST question. I have family in Ajka, which is a city with population of 36,000. I was planning on returning to Ajka, the cost of living appear to be lower than in Budapest. My nephew informed me that I could rent a one bedroom flat for $250 a month. Even though I will be retired, I do want to continue to be productive. Perhaps teaching English as a second language or a position that would utilize my English language skills. Admittedly, my Hungarian is very rusty. My SECOND request for feedback would be for some ideas for employment. I worked for the past 25 years with the mentally ill, supervised convicted sex offender Cognitive Restructuring treatment for Superior Court. Currently I am a Behavioral Health Social Worker in an acute care medical hospital, working with suicidal and substance abusing patients. Any feedback is appreciated. Thank you in advance. Öcsi - Joe
profray replied on August 27, 2014 with:
Dear Joe, You may have some difficulty (hopefully not) with citizen verification. Some of that paperwork was lost during the 1989 change time. We had a similar problem but the ministry took care of it. I would suggest doing the official work outside of Budapest (we did our paperwork in Gyor, very competent and no lines or having to travel all over town to get approvals or pay money). The villages around that area are very nice, quiet, places with farming, retirees, and local shops most places. Vesprem is nice and the whole region is quite pleasant. Hope things have recovered in Ajka well enough. They had a very unfortunate problem with the bauxite tailings which I am sure you heard about at the time. Gook luck!
Hotjazzman replied on August 05, 2014 with:
You are a HU citizen if you were born in HU, from parent(s) who were HU citizens at that time. You need to obtain your birth cert. at the locality you were born in. In BUD you have to figure out the district first, and go that district's Registry office. They're open usually only on specific days and hours. If your surname hasn't changed, it should be no problem, you'll get it right away. (Bring your US passport). You may need to know your mother's maiden name, birthdate and her birthplace. From there you go to the local Okmanyiroda or something similar named place (Documents office) - actually, it might be in the same office - and apply for a HU passport with your B/C. You'll need to give them a Hungarian address. They'll notify you (by mail) when you can pick the passport up. Without the passport you cannot legally work.
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FeliciaOni initially posted:
My father and I plan on moving to Hungary in Spring of 2015. He is a 57year old veteran and on social security disability for life. I am 34 year old female and i live with him and i am his legal and sole caregiver and family. He and I will live together in Hungary as we do here in Florida USA. His disability is enough monthly income for both of us, there for he is permanently disabled and can not work and i will not be working either, he takes care of me. Our net take home income is 2000 USA dollars a month. Is that going to be enough for us to live normal? What are the costs for a 2 or 3 bedroom apartment? The sites i have looked at in English were beyond expensive. I mean we live on the beach in Florida in one of the busiest and tourist heavy places on earth and the prices i saw would be expensive for here! But then i hear that Hungary is a very affordable place to live so i am a bit confused. I know Budapest is the biggest city in Hungary, but should we look at some of the smaller towns for better affordability? We will not be working so being close to jobs or universities is not important to us at all. And we are moving from the USA so being close to lots of other USA people is not something we would need nor desire. Right now my father has a malpractice lawsuit against the hospital pending also. If that goes in our favor then our net(take home)income will increase from 2000 a month usa dollars to 5000 net(take home) a month. But we will know by Jan if that is going in our favor. We will not apply for our residence permit until then when we know what our monthly income will be. So i am wanting to know if what we have now would be enough to live, and if we are able to get more then just live better.
profray replied on August 27, 2014 with:
Hey Felicia, We have enjoyed living in Gyor on about $2k/mo for the past 5 yrs. We are working so have the national health care, but I still pay for my US insurance out of my pension income. I have a resident card since I have a job here (catch 22 a little, cant get a job if you don't have a card, cant get a card if you don't have a job, just like US). Living outside of downtown BP is not expensive; comparable to most anywhere in the US.
gbbhdb444 replied on July 31, 2014 with:
P.S. One of my cousins just sold her apartment in the outskirts of Budapest for $31,000USD. Use a lawyer to purchase when you get ready to do so.
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profray replied to the thread VAT on the Hungary forum:
jim42 initially posted:
VAT 27%? Is that on all comsumer goods. I am kinda looking at a vacation there in Mar 2015 but I have to do a lot more recess. Thanks, Jim
profray replied on August 27, 2014 with:
Hi Jim, the other responders are correct, you don't feel the tax. I have lived here for 5 years and can say the food/lodging prices are very reasonable. For the short term, restraunts with daily menu items run from 800-1000 Ft ($4-5). Long term, cost for groceries is reasonable at Lidl, Aldi, or local markets. If you want to live as if you are in an American suburb, think again, since that sort of living does not fit well into how things work here. If you are willing to adapt a bit (not at all an unpleasant experience) then cost of living is comparable. Bp is more expensive downtown, but so is NY, Chi, LA, Atl etc.. I would say vacation without fearing for prices too much, its cheaper than Paris or Rome or Vienna, Amsterdam or most other W.European places. .
Hotjazzman replied on August 19, 2014 with:
Paddington is obviously unaware of European (EU) fuel prices, he is still comparing it to the US. That's not only dishonest, but stupid as well. Paddington wants America in HU. Anything in HU that doesn't conform his American experience and expectations(!) are uniformly bad. Hungary's current $6.85/gal is a pretty good deal compared to a dozen other EU countries. (Math: 422x3.8 /234 = 6.85) Here are some comparisons as of 7/28/14 in USDollars: Belgium: 7.72 France: 7.74 Germany: 8.10 Italy: 8.94 Holland: 8.82 UK: 8.42 Austria's is roughly the same as HU's It's not so bad now that you see some of the others, is it?
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property in Hungary44 m2, partly furnished apartment in green, silent street, 5 minutes from City park. Excellent public transport, 10 minutes from the centre.
Greetings, Yes it is true, Hungary is slowly is becoming the "neutral" country of Central Europe. This role has long been held by Austria but times are changing. A gradual move has been made where Hungary has learned to play well with the folks at both ends of the table. Since this is politically feasible one can not help to think that it will be also beneficial economically for Hungary. This is good news for those who moved and will move here. If Hungary can maintain the delicate balance and walk the fence it will do well. As a NATO member an as a commercial partner with Russia at the same time it is in an increasingly enviable position. Even as Putin has ordered to curtail imports from EU countries it will quietly cut breaks for Hungary who's leaders have not been very vocal about the recent events involving the Ukraine. From it's 27% VAT which hopefully can only go down will give Hungary another boost. So things are looking up.......
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peddington replied to the thread buying property to get residence permit on the Hungary forum:
sbhk initially posted:
Hi. I was wondering if you buy a flat or a house in Hungary, can you get a residence permit or a multiple visa each year to stay at your bought house or flat. Also wondering if it is possible for non EU citizen to buy a house in smaller villages / rural areas
peddington replied most recently with:
Greetings, Buying a property in Hungary really has very little to do with getting a "residency permit". Yes you need a local address but that can be satisfied with a rental agreement or similar. If you a foreigner (understand not a Hungarian citizen) you must get prior permission from the local mayor usually via a county office. It is a simple process that will cost 50,000 forint, a certified copy of your passport and a letter of request (can be hand written) but I recommend a lawyer to do it. Then you wait about a month and you will have your permission. A pre-contract on the house may be necessary. Good luck!
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Hotjazzman replied to the thread I live in Phoenix, Arizona US on the Hungary forum:
ÖcsiJoe initially posted:
In 2016 i will be returning to my home town Ajka, Hungary. I wish to thank those who replied to my previous questions. Especially want to thank Hotjazzman for the advice on transferring US $ into HU bank. I plan on purchasing a house or Condo; could someone recommend a reputable Bank where I could transfer a large sum of US $? I believe before one makes a life altering move, exhaustive research should be done about others' experiences to prevent making wrong decisions. I logged onto a website of a car dealership in Budapest, but I found that the prices significantly higher than the same vehicle in the US. How did others handle taking a vehicle into Hungary? Thank you in advance. ---Joe---
Hotjazzman replied most recently with:
I forgot the requirements. To open an account, it MUST be in PERSON. No way around it. You'll need a Passport and must be able to provide a Hungarian mailing address. It doesn't have to be an address you LIVE at, rent or own, but one for correspondence.
Hotjazzman replied most recently with:
OTP Bank is the successor of the old (Communist) regime's public savings bank. It's a legit bank in fact it's still the largest (but not the best) , with branches and ATMs everywhere. Do a Google on "OTP bank" and one of the links will show the branches in HU/BUD. Erste is an Austrian bank, they also have many-many branches in HU; you can do the same Google search as on OTP Bank to see the branches/ATMs. I personally prefer Erste, but for a few certain services - like phone fill-up for Vodafone - OTP is more convenient. Their services, packages differ significantly from each other, so you have to research and decide which is best for your circumstances. In HU, you can have bank accounts in various foreign denominations (unlike in the US), like in USD, Euro, Swiss Franc. All monies sent, deposited, wired in whatever kind of currency, will be converted to, and deposited in the account's denomination.
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