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stevetk replied to the thread I am looking for expat medical insurance for Hua Hin on the Thailand forum on July 24, 2014:
hbft58 initially posted:
Can someone give me some advice?
stevetk replied on July 23, 2014 with:
Please email at info@phoenixconsultantsltd.com and I can sort out for you.
caughtintheact replied on July 21, 2014 with:
BUPA is an insurance provider, Just search the web for BUPA Thailand or BUPA Bangkok, and call them to see if they can cover you in your location. You can also try contacting your embassy If the above gets no results try a web search for Expat health insurance [name of location[, (without the brackets).
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caughtintheact posted Thailand - New Rules for tourists who overstay visas on the Thailand forum on July 22, 2014:
In the past many people came to Thailand and overstayed. their visas, whether to work illegally or just remain in Thailand. Overstays will not be permitted and anyone who does overstay can expect to be banned from entering the country for a period of time. The new rules are posted here: http://bangkok.immigration.go.th/popup_anounce.html
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caughtintheact replied to the thread income tax on the Thailand forum:
thaistyle29 initially posted:
When my wife and I move over to chiangmai if I have a problem doing my income tax are there any people or places. Who can help me. Thanks....steven
caughtintheact replied on July 21, 2014 with:
By the way, you need to check out the FBAR report ans the FATCA report FBAR: http://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/Report-of-Foreign-Bank-and-Financial-Accounts-FBAR FATCA: http://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Corporations/Foreign-Account-Tax-Compliance-Act-FATCA
caughtintheact replied on July 21, 2014 with:
Usually the 1040A is pretty easy, except maybe for figuring out social security. I'd I'd recommend that you file online with Turbotax.com, as they walk you through each step.and do the calculations for you, and depending on your income level, it might be free. And even if you have to pay, it will probably be cheaper than a tax consultant. You can check with http://www.jprooney.com/ to see what they will charge or if they know someone in your area , or check with the American Embassy in Bangkok, or with U.S. Citizen's service at the American Embassy in Bangkok http://bangkok.usembassy.gov/service.html You can also do a web search for something like u.s. citizen tax assistance hua hin And not least, you can ask people in your area.
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Scott Dunn are a luxury tour operator renowned for the excellent childcare they provide across the Mediterranean and Alps. Last year we started a new partnership with the luxury Soneva Kiri resort to run their children’s club. Soneva Kiri is the ultimate in barefoot luxury, situated on the remote island of Koh Kood, it is an amazing opportunity to do the job you love in a beautiful location.
Expat ArticlesArticle Summary: Expats in Bankok, Thailand enjoy a wonderful lifestyle for a variety of reasons. Emily McClaren explores why it is a popular destination for expats from all over the world. (Continue)
djappger replied most recently with:
This from a close friend, former Marine helicopter & major US airline pilot who has owned a 1/2 million dollar home in Puckett for many years. Here are his thoughts: "Heat, humidity, vehicle exhaust, standstill traffic, pathetic construction workmanship, violent crime, incessant power outages, cultural-intellectual desert. "Land of Scowls," (rather than Smiles) would be more appropriate. What attracted me is no longer valid, being happily married. ;-) Thought I had found eternal youth.....Forgot to mention "Lese Majeste." No freedom of speech or opinion. Say something negative about the monarchy and you get 15 years in prison. Have to stand up for two minutes before a movie begins to honor the king......
Austintatious replied recently with:
WOW...such a misinformed article. I have been teaching in Thai universities for several years and I have traveled all over the country. My take on your 5 points: 1) There are many good private hospitals in the Bangkok, Pattaya and Phuket areas, and I have visited a couple of them. Many of these hospitals specialize in medical tourism and do a good job, at a reasonable price. In the countryside the medical care is adequate and has improved substantially over the last decade. In terms of dentistry, even the Farang price is low, but service seems rushed - a checkup/cleaning is usually completed in about 10 minutes. 2) Food, like music, is a matter of personal preference. I love Thai cuisine, but quite honestly the Thai food in California's Thai restaurants is consistently better than the Thai food you will find in all but a few restaurants in Thailand. Thais don't seem to mind a lot of bones, guts and chicken skin mixed in with their dinners. However, you can find tasty street meals for about 30 baht (one US dollar) if you don't mind the extra work of removing bones, etc. 3) Great weather? If you like hot and humid weather, then Thailand is great. There are usually a few weeks of nice weather in December/January, but otherwise most of Thailand is more like Houston in summertime. The rainy season is June-October and the rest of the year is dry. The smoke from farms burning rice stubble and from thousands of cooks using charcoal makes the air unhealthy much of the year. 4) Relative to about 40 other countries I have visited, people in Thailand tend to walk and exercise less than any of them. Motorbikes are everywhere and people don't walk if they need to go just one kilometer. It is just too hot and humid. Swimming? Have you seen how filthy most of the rivers and lakes are in Thailand? Get far enough away from the cities and the beaches are OK, but they are declining. 5) Farangs cannot buy land/houses in Thailand unless they are married to a Thai person. You can buy a condo, and renting is of course more popular. As for traffic, Bangkok is no worse than NYC, LA, Chicago, or Houston. The taxi drivers are clever and the BTS is very good, so overall it is not too bad. The recent military coup will ensure that most of Thailand's resources remain concentrated in the Bangkok area while the countryside gets the short end of the stick. This will not affect many foreigners unless some type of civil war erupts. Personally, I found this to be "the straw that broke the camel's back" and I left Thailand for good in May. I will miss the norther half of Thailand, but I will not miss the smoke and feral dogs.
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caughtintheact replied to the thread Renovation of Non Immigrant Visums O/A. on the Thailand forum:
epsacori initially posted:
Which proof of income is requiered? In accordance to the Thai embassy in Berlin the opening of a local account ion Thailand is not required anymore. Does a copy of bank statement will do? or they will ask for some sort of certification?
caughtintheact replied most recently with:
The rules can vary by type of visa, country and whether or not this is your first application. , I recommend you contact the German Embassy in Bangkok and ask them, You will cer4tainly need a letter from the Embassy where you certify your income, but you need to know what the letter has to say. You can also go to www.thaivisa.com and visit the forums where you can ask, but be sure to be specific on the type of visa you are applying for and if this will be your first application.
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dpcjsr replied to the thread No More Winters,kids got old; on the Thailand forum:
Clamdigger53 initially posted:
Retired and need a break.When things settle down I will have approx. $3,000 a month to run away! Thailand seems to be the most welcoming.Am i a bit too optimistic,is Thailand as good as my research indicates?Sure like the looks of the South East Asian neighborhood.
dpcjsr replied most recently with:
Thailand has many positives for retirees, no doubt. My struggle when I was there had to do with the language. I found it nearly impossible to learn Thai and many westerners have a similar experience. Living with this handicap daily started to grind me down. I would dread even going out to a restaurant or almost any other activity, which is most of them, that required communications with the locals. Thailand is very cheap with some wonderful people, warm climate, good health care etc. You will not be disappointed. Some cope better than I did as I met people who had lived there over 20 years and still did not speak Thai. I am not discouraging you just letting you know that the cultural shock and the language barrier will be substantial so you should be prepared psychologically. I knew this but did not fully feel it until I was in the country. chao
trickeyhammers replied most recently with:
I am curious about your 4 dollar days.
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RickG posted Retirement visa to a business visa? on the Thailand forum:
Hello all, Can an O-A retirement visa be converted to a B business visa? If so, can it be done within Thailand? Thanks in advance. Rick
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caughtintheact replied to the thread Moving my family for a mini-retirement on the Thailand forum:
petersen313 initially posted:
Hello all! I am considering a mini-retirement (6 to 8 months) and wonder if anyone has some insights on a few questions: - Does anyone have any recommendations on a trustworthy and dependable real-estate agent that we could pay to help us find a house to rent? - What are the areas of the country that you would recommend? Low crime, reasonably affordable, and outside of the big cities would be a must. We'd like to be within a 15-30 minute drive of a nice beach (or closer if possible), and would prefer our home to be somewhat secluded if that is at all feasible. Are there areas like this in this country? - What would be the biggest 3 or 4 adjustments that we'd have to make moving up out of the states (we live currently in Utah)? - What is the housing like in this country? We'd be looking to rent a full house...large enough for 7 people (2 adults and 5 children) and I'm wondering if these types of homes are easy to find for rent. - I would be able to tele-commute for work, so I'd need reliable high-speed internet? Would this be available in the places recommended? - How hard is it to get a Visa or temp. residence permit? - What could we expect by way of living expenses? Rent, food, etc. About how much less would the cost of living be as compared with the U.S.? - How critical would it be to learn the language? Is it possible to get around with English? - Is crime anything we'd want to be concerned about (more than here in the states, for example)? - We're considering a number of countries: Panama, Belize, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Thialand, Cambodia, and perhaps Vietnam. Any insights into the pro's vs. con's of any of these? Thanks a ton in advance!
caughtintheact replied most recently with:
My comments follow your questionjs: Hello all! I am considering a mini-retirement (6 to 8 months) and wonder if anyone has some insights on a few questions: • First, there are no extensions of stay for “mini-retirement” here, so if you are talking about a long vacation, then I recommend that you contact the nearest Thai Embassy or consulate to get the latest rules on which type of visas allow a stay of 6-8 months. The rules are changing on tourist visas in August , and I do not want to give you bad information. In addition your country of origin may have special rules or restrictions. You can find contact information for embassies and consulates at http://www.thaiembassy.org/main/ or just search for Thai embassies and consulates. Does anyone have any recommendations on a trustworthy and dependable real-estate agent that we could pay to help us find a house to rent? • It is hard to make recommendations on real estate agents without knowing where you plan to stay. I’d recommend coming here, staying in a hotel or similar until you learn your way around and then decide where to live. Then you will be better able to seek suitable accommodations. You can get information on hotels and homes, anmd apartments and conos at www.agoda.com and www.bookings.com You may even find that something like beach hotels or beach bungalows meet your needs and in many cases long term rates are available. I do not recommend making any long term commitments in advance, since what you get might not be what you want, and you will be obligated to meet the terms of any contract. What are the areas of the country that you would recommend? Low crime, reasonably affordable, and outside of the big cities would be a must. We'd like to be within a 15-30 minute drive of a nice beach (or closer if possible), and would prefer our home to be somewhat secluded if that is at all feasible. Are there areas like this in this country? • I do not live in or near a beach area, so I will not try to give you any specific recommendations. From what I have read lately, there seems to be a bit of a crime increase in Phuket, but that does not mean in every part of that area, and Phuket is a very beautiful beach location. Thailand has a very long cvoastline, and there are other beach areas which you might want to look into: Prachuab-khirikhan/Hua Hin, Pattaya/Jpmthien, Krabi, Rayong, are also be worth looking into. As for reasonably affordable, that means many different things to different people. The cost of accommodations and living expenses runs from very low to very high. So in any of the areas I mentioned above you will probably find something to suit your budget and other needs. What would be the biggest 3 or 4 adjustments that we'd have to make moving up out of the states (we live currently in Utah)? • Coming from Utah, the biggest adjustment is likely to be the weather, as this is a tropical climate. There are essentially 3 seasons, the hot season, the rainy-hot season, and the cool season, and the months n which these seasons occur depend on where you live. Temperatures range from as low as 12C (abt 54F) in the north of the country to a rare 40C (abt 104F) in some other parts of the co9untry. Air-conditioning is readily available. I’ve seen this temperature range for almost 40 years. Also, generally speaking, the sea breezes make the resort areas cooler than in the city where I live (Bangkok) • Thai behavior is different from what you are used to at home. If you decide to make Thailand your choice of countries for this vacation, then send me a private message (PM) on this site and I will send you a paper I wrote on the Do’s and Don’t’s for Thailand. Some foreigners have a problem accepting that things are different here, and thus their behavior can get them in trouble. • Don’t expect Thailand to change for you. • In Thai there are no words that specifically mean “Yes” and “No”. So when you think that someone said “yes”, they may just be acknowledging that you said something, and may not even understand what you said. • The nominal per capita income in Thailand (less than $6000/year) is much lower than in the USA, although the PPP per capita income is quite a bit higher than the nominal. This means that the Thai on average are less affluent than foreign visitors. Thus do not be surprised at two tier pricing for such things as tourist attractions. • If you are not familiar with the Thai language, it helps a lot to learn a few phrases. The Thai like it when foreigners at least try to learn some of the Thai language, but don’t be upset if they laugh, as the Thai are generally a fun loving people. Being a tonal language, Thai can be daunting for some. • Control one’s temper at all times. Getting angry can have unpleasant results. • Always show respect for Thai Royalty and avoid committing Lèse-majesté • Thailand is a Buddhist country, so it is imperative to avoid showing disrespect for Buddha images. Children need to be told in no uncertain terms not to climb on or deface images of Buddha or they will find themselves in trouble. • Again, my list of Dos and Don’ts has much more guidance. What is the housing like in this country? We'd be looking to rent a full house...large enough for 7 people (2 adults and 5 children) and I'm wondering if these types of homes are easy to find for rent. • Finding a large home for rent in a secluded area might be difficult in a beach area, but you can search the web for something like Thailand houses for rent and see what you come up with. However, this is why I recommend that you send a little time in the area you want to live before entering into any contracts. I would be able to tele-commute for work, so I'd need reliable high-speed internet? • In many areas there is high speed Internet available, but not necessarily country-wide. Here are some of the major ISPs and you can look at their sites to see what they offer. • A. CSLoxinfo www.csloxinfo,com • B. True Visions http://www.trueinternet.co.th/ENG/home.html • You can find out more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_in_Thailand Would this be available in the places recommended? • You would need to check witjh the ISPs for the area you select. How hard is it to get a Visa or temp. residence permit? • There are no temporary residence visas. If you are planning to do any business with Thailand, then you might be able to get a business visa. Other types of visas are for education and tourists. Check with your nearest consulate http://63.76.233.92/dcdp/?q=consulate_general, and there is an honorary Thai consul in UTAH (SALT LAKE CITY) • ROYAL THAI HONORARY CONSULATE • Administrative Office • 8th Ave. & C St. • Salt Lake City, Utah 84143 • Tel. 801-408-1901 • or the Thai Embassy in Washington DC http://63.76.233.92/dcdp/ for your options. Tourism is a high priority for the incumbent Thai government (The National Co0uncil for Peace and Order – NCPO) , so there may be some special offers available. The NCPO is working in close cooperation with the private sector to restore confidence in Thailand as a great tourist destination, which it was anyway, since the recent political turmoil did not affect most tourist areas. What could we expect by way of living expenses? Rent, food, etc. About how much less would the cost of living be as compared with the U.S.? • The cost of living in Thailand can be much lower than in the USA, but as with the USA, it depends on where you live, and the same applies here. For example, if you eat Thai food all the time, your food costs should be significantly less than od in the uSA. But Thai food is quite spicy for the most part, and thus there may be higher costs of the blander foreign food, especially when it or its ingredients are imported. • Of you provide some examples of what your family likes, it might be easier to do a comparison. How critical would it be to learn the language? Is it possible to get around with English? • The main language used in Thailand is called Central Thai, and it is required for Thai throughout the country as the national language. While English is widely spoken, learning some of the Thai language will be very helpful, as fluent English speakers may not always be available. There are plenty of phrase books available at bookstores here, and it would pay to gtet a copy or two of Robertson’s Practical English Thai Dictionary before coming here. It uses an excellent transliteration system making pronunciation more accurate. http://www.amazon.com/Robertsons-Practical-English-thai-Dictionary-Robertson/dp/080480706X • Amazon also has phrasebooks available, but they may be less expensive here. Is crime anything we'd want to be concerned about (more than here in the states, for example)? • This is hard to answer since crime rates vary all over the USA by wide degrees. If the crime rate in your part of Utah is very low compared to the crime rate in Washington, D.C. and/or Chicago, then expect Thailand to be mre like home in that respect. Having been here for almost 40 years, I nhave never felt unsafe or threatened in Bangkok, as long as I avoid dark lanes at night. The best way to learn about potential crime is from the expats in the area you decide to live in. We're considering a number of countries: Panama, Belize, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Thialand, Cambodia, and perhaps Vietnam. Any insights into the pro's vs. con's of any of these? • I have spent time in all three Asian countries, but prefer Thailand. Others may prefer Cambodia or Vietnam. And since the USA is inviting in the world illegally, some of those central American countries might find themselves begging for people to come live there.
fabien replied most recently with:
you ask many questions... please , consider to come for long vacation and visit many places in thailand , because you can find all: very busy attractive for tourists cities(hua hin, Pattaya, samui, Phuket) all expensive (not Pattaya, but this city is only for sex tourism, sea very dirty).. you like very contry sides: isaan or north, but a little alone in cities and no sea until 600km mini cheap, beautiful with variate coast, capital for sea food and pineapple, close to burma's boarder(15km) on the sea with security on the beaches with army place, restauants very good (max 8_10 usd) , little community european and american people, very typical, land and rent cheaper than all the coast, no risk for tsunami(gulf of thailand) ...this is what i have chosen :PRACHUAP KHIRI KHAN you can rent or buy land or house...we are at 700m from 1 of the beaches..in coconut garden you can stay with retired visa 6month renew 1 time, and than every year if you are more than 50 years old connection to me : thail.fra @gmail.com sincerly
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