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Expat Exchange - Homeschooling in Sri Lanka
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Hikkaduwa, Sri Lanka


Homeschooling in Sri Lanka

By Joshua Wood, LPC

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Summary: If you're moving with kids to Sri Lanka and homeschooling is something you're considering, it's important to do your research and learn about homeschooling in Sri Lanka.

Education is a fundamental right for every child, and the method of imparting this education can vary. In Sri Lanka, a country known for its high literacy rate, homeschooling is an alternative form of education that is slowly gaining recognition. While the traditional school system is still the most common form of education, homeschooling offers a unique approach that caters to individual learning styles and paces. This article will delve into the legality, prevalence, requirements, resources, university admissions considerations, and the pros and cons of homeschooling in Sri Lanka, particularly for expatriate families.

Is it legal to homeschool in Sri Lanka?

Yes, homeschooling is legal in Sri Lanka. The country's constitution does not explicitly mention homeschooling, but it does guarantee the right to education. This has been interpreted to include homeschooling. However, it's important to note that while homeschooling is legal, it is not officially recognized by the government. This means that homeschooling families may face challenges when it comes to university admissions or transferring to a traditional school. For foreign residents or expats, homeschooling is also allowed, but they may need to comply with the education laws of their home country.

Is Homeschooling common in Sri Lanka?

While homeschooling is legal in Sri Lanka, it is not very common. The majority of families in Sri Lanka still prefer the traditional school system. However, there is a small but growing community of homeschoolers in the country, particularly among expatriate families who prefer to continue the homeschooling method they used in their home countries.

What specific requirements are there for homeschoolers in Sri Lanka?

There are no specific legal requirements for homeschooling in Sri Lanka. However, it is generally recommended that homeschooling parents follow a curriculum and maintain records of their child's progress. This can be helpful for university admissions or if the child ever needs to transfer to a traditional school. It's also important to note that while there are no specific requirements, homeschooling families may face challenges due to the lack of official recognition of homeschooling by the government.

Are there groups or resources for families who homeschool in Sri Lanka?

Yes, there are several resources and groups available for homeschooling families in Sri Lanka. These include online forums, homeschooling cooperatives, and private tutors. There are also international homeschooling organizations that provide resources and support for homeschooling families in Sri Lanka. However, these resources are not as abundant as in countries where homeschooling is more common.

What should homeschooling parents take into consideration for university admissions in Sri Lanka and internationally?

University admissions can be a challenge for homeschooling students in Sri Lanka due to the lack of official recognition of homeschooling by the government. However, many universities, both in Sri Lanka and internationally, are becoming more open to accepting homeschooling students. Homeschooling parents should maintain detailed records of their child's education and may need to provide additional documentation, such as portfolios or standardized test scores. It's also recommended that homeschooling students take the GCE Ordinary Level and Advanced Level examinations, which are recognized by universities in Sri Lanka and internationally.

What are the Pros and Cons of homeschooling in Sri Lanka (for expat families)?

The main advantage of homeschooling in Sri Lanka for expat families is the flexibility it offers. Homeschooling allows families to tailor the education to the child's individual needs and pace, and it can also provide continuity if the family moves frequently. However, the main disadvantage is the lack of official recognition of homeschooling by the government, which can pose challenges for university admissions and socialization. Additionally, homeschooling requires a significant time commitment from parents, which may not be feasible for all families.

About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.


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Hikkaduwa, Sri Lanka

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