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Expat Exchange - Moving with a Pet to Austria
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 Gardens at Schonbrunn Palace in Vienna


Moving with a Pet to Austria

By Betsy Burlingame

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Summary: Prepare for your move to Austria with a pet. Understand the vaccination needs, travel details, and item restrictions in Austria. This essential guide helps you navigate the process of moving with your pet and reduce the chance of unnecessary complications.

Moving to Austria with a pet involves a series of regulations and requirements to ensure the safety and well-being of your animal companion. Austria is generally pet-friendly, and it is not uncommon to see residents walking their dogs or caring for their cats. However, bringing a pet into the country requires adherence to vaccination and paperwork requirements, and understanding the local rules regarding pet ownership. While quarantine is not typically required for pets entering Austria from most countries, there are specific conditions that must be met to avoid any complications. This article will delve into the details of what you need to know about moving to Austria with your pet, including the process of bringing them into the country, prohibited pets, and what to do upon arrival.

Can I bring my dog to Austria?

Yes, you can bring your dog to Austria, but you must comply with the country's pet import regulations. Your dog must be microchipped with an ISO 11784/11785 compliant 15-digit pet microchip and vaccinated against rabies. The vaccination must occur after the microchip is implanted and at least 21 days before travel. Additionally, you will need an EU pet passport or a veterinary certificate confirming your dog's health status. Dogs entering from high-rabies countries may require a rabies titer test.

Can I bring my cat to Austria?

Similar to dogs, cats are also welcome in Austria, provided they meet the necessary health requirements. Your cat must be microchipped and vaccinated against rabies. The microchip should be ISO 11784/11785 compliant, and the rabies vaccination must be administered after the microchip implantation and at least 21 days before entering Austria. An EU pet passport or an official veterinary certificate is also required. Cats from high-rabies countries may need to undergo a rabies titer test as well.

Pets that are Prohibited from Coming into Austria

Austria has restrictions on certain breeds of dogs that are considered dangerous and may be prohibited or subject to specific regulations. These breeds typically include Pit Bull Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, Bull Terriers, and any mix of these breeds. Additionally, exotic animals and certain species of birds, reptiles, and rodents may be subject to bans or require special permits. It is crucial to check the latest regulations before attempting to bring any pet that might fall under these categories.

How do I bring my pet to Austria?

To bring your pet to Austria, you must ensure that all the necessary paperwork is in order. This includes an EU pet passport for pets traveling from within the EU or a third-country official veterinary certificate for pets coming from outside the EU. The certificate should include proof of microchipping and a valid rabies vaccination. If you are coming from a country with a high incidence of rabies, a rabies titer test may be required, and the results should be recorded in the pet passport or veterinary certificate. It's also advisable to have your pet treated against tapeworms and ticks before traveling. Always check the latest requirements well in advance of your travel date to ensure a smooth entry into Austria.

Upon Arriving in Austria

Once you and your pet have arrived in Austria, there are a few steps you should take to settle in. While there is no mandatory quarantine for pets arriving from EU countries and most non-EU countries, it's important to register your pet with the local municipality and obtain any necessary licenses. Finding a veterinarian can be done through local recommendations or online searches, and it's advisable to schedule a check-up soon after arrival. Austrians generally have a positive attitude towards pets, and you'll find that dogs and cats are quite popular. Dog parks are available in many cities, providing spaces for your dog to play and socialize. Remember to always adhere to local pet etiquette and regulations, such as leash laws and cleaning up after your pet, to maintain a good relationship with your new community.

About the Author

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.


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Gardens at Schonbrunn Palace in Vienna

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SJB Global is a top-rated financial advisory firm specializing in expat financial advice worldwide, offering retirement planning & tax-efficient solutions with a regressive fee model.
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