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Moving soon

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Romaroast
5/6/2016 09:46 EST

I am moving to Argentina next month, flying by the seat of my pants as the saying goes! I really need some insight on where it is best for low costs and job availability. I am flexible on location as long as close to shopping and not cold. I will not have a lot to start out with and I am literally starting over.

TomP
5/6/2016 09:57 EST

Romaroast,

My heart is with you but why would you choose Argentina if your savings are limited and you have no job or steady income like a pension? Over the last eight years Argentina has been ravaged by run away inflation (30%+ a year) and it now costs for a loaf of bread, a liter of milk or a kilo of meat the same price as the USA. Also, if you don't have a car but need a job to pay rent you'll need to be in the center of a city that offers regular buses. I don't know what you wage expectations are but Argentine wages are low, about US Dollars $600 - $800 monthly. You might want to rethink what you are doing and either choose another country that is in fact cheaper or stay where you are and save a few thousand dollars before you leave.

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TomP
5/6/2016 09:57 EST

Romaroast,

My heart is with you but why would you choose Argentina if your savings are limited and you have no job or steady income like a pension? Over the last eight years Argentina has been ravaged by run away inflation (30%+ a year) and it now costs for a loaf of bread, a liter of milk or a kilo of meat the same price as the USA. Also, if you don't have a car but need a job to pay rent you'll need to be in the center of a city that offers regular buses. I don't know what you wage expectations are but Argentine wages are low, about US Dollars $600 - $800 monthly. You might want to rethink what you are doing and either choose another country that is in fact cheaper or stay where you are and save a few thousand dollars before you leave.

Romaroast
5/6/2016 10:02 EST

Argentina actually came up as one one of the cheapest places to live. Your news is not good news! I do have several thousand dollars to start with but not huge amount of funds. Is there somewhere else you would suggest then? As I said Im very flexible as to location. Argentina or otherwise.

TomP
5/6/2016 14:25 EST

Romaroast,

I didn't mean to scare you from living in Argentina, rather, I wanted to give you a realistic POV because I lived there for 5 years. With the new Presidente Macri things are looking up and can only get better. Do you speak Spanish? Being bi-lingual might land you a better job.

Romaroast
5/6/2016 15:27 EST

yes you scared me for sure because I really need to move to some place that I can afford to at least start out and not worry about ending up homeless countryless and living in a cardboard box type of thing LOL i dont speak spanish hardly at all...some french...but i can learn. i have also thought about brazil but argentina sounded more affordable. i dont have a lot of time to figure this out as the house im living in will soon be sold.

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TomP
5/6/2016 16:00 EST

Romaroast,

I would think twice about Brasil. Its economy is really tanking right now. But with the Olympics coming up maybe your English will be a strong factor in hiring you. I would think if you know French, Spanish would come naturally. In Brasil it's Portuguese and maybe not as easy to learn. How many US dollars will you have to take to Argentina or Brasil? Also, in most, if not every city in Argentina you will need an Argentine Co-Signor on any lease or even a rental unless you are paying daily Hotel rates. If you can't get a co-signor the landlord may ask for six to twelve months rent up front. Discriminatory, yes, reality, yes.

Romaroast
5/6/2016 16:08 EST

After plane ticket (round trip I believe I have to have?) I will have approx $8,000 US. I do have a contact in Brazil that lives there, but not a soul in Argentina.

Romaroast
5/6/2016 16:20 EST

After buying plane ticket (I HAVE to purchase round trip i believe??) I will have approx 8000.00 US. I do have a contact that lives in Brazil that might be able to help a little for information if I went that route. i would have NOBODY in Argentina so from what you say, that might be a bad idea? I thought about the Olympic being in Brazil, but I also figured that would drive up costs as well as make housing hard to find.

todikaios
5/6/2016 17:15 EST

I echo Tom's comments. I have been visiting Argentina for the past 10 years, as I have a close relationship I want to continue to foster....but I would NEVER think of moving here on a permanent basis. Five years ago and more, the prices for most everything was much less than the US, now the only thing that is less is the price of wine, and most items are higher than what I pay in Connecticut (which is a high cost of living state). Inflation is a sad reality --every month prices go up 5%, even wine. In January my wine cost 33 pesos (in a small chinese supermercado), now the price is 40 pesos. That's more than 20% in less than 4 months. To find a job (as a foreigner) which would pay you sufficiently to live like someone with $30K in the US, is nigh unto impossible....unless you have some specialized skills and the job is waiting for you. The documentation and steps to gain permanent residency and the legal right to work legally are absurdly limitless, and they are not cheap. Don't come to Argentina because of some romantic idea that everyone is a tango dancer, and wants to welcome with open arms a new citizen....especially not from the USA. Even if you have rudimentary language skills, you are thought of as an outsider. I can share a lot more....but I agree with Tom.....look elsewhere for an inexpensive location.....and if you want a warm place, Buenos Aires has 3 to 4 months of cool and wet days, like November or March in New York City. I don't know where you are moving from (your present location) but I would suggest the Philippines, or some places in México, or perhaps the Dominican Republic, for warmth and inexpensive living. As far as I can tell, there is NO country in S.A. where you will enjoy the same personal and property rights that U.S. citizens take for granted. Bottom line....perhaps in 2 - 3 years, there might be a turnaround with the new President, but right now, I'd cross Argentina off the list.

Romaroast
5/6/2016 17:22 EST

Appreciate the input. And no, nothing like romance and tango, just ready for a change. I have travelled the states and went to africa last year. i really liked that but algeria is no place for a single american woman, even if it was wonderful and the costs were low. i guess i am back to square 1 with this moving thing. :( thanks for the info guys

mariomesquita
5/6/2016 19:00 EST

Maybe Belize....???

Romaroast
5/6/2016 21:10 EST

I will look into that, thank you :)

mariomesquita
5/6/2016 21:29 EST

Placencia - Belize...( official language is English)
Costa Rica??
But I firmly believe in a string research before you make a move....maybe a trip down there first?
Tulum in Mexico is quite nice also....
Just sharing places that I have been doing some research for a definitive move also...cheers!...all the best..

mariomesquita
5/6/2016 21:30 EST

Strong research advised...*

SaintJohn
5/6/2016 22:58 EST

You are very welcome, Romaroast.

I know a nice park, where you can collect good grass for your matress and wher you can sleep under a bridge. I can also show you a couple of good streets to beg in, when you have realized, that you can't find a job, because you don't speak castellano fluently.

What on Earrth gives you the idea that you can just move to Argentina and pick up the gold they undubitablyuse to pave the streats?

expat0tree
5/7/2016 06:47 EST

i read the responses to your question and i feel like i must share my story.

i was living with my parents in canada couple of years ago, with no steady income, things were getting worse by the day. eventually i saved some money with my fast food jobs but that was still not enough to move out and live independently anywhere in canada, education is unaffordable just like everything else there, so i figured why not look at other countries. right?

so then, i went online to this language exchange website called interpals.net and started meeting people, i found that lots and lots of them were in similar situations, tons of them were in search of new opportunities.

ok so to make long story short, one day i came across a random argentine girl online, one year later we are married living together here in argentina, both employed, job not ideal, yes salary sucks but we found ways to save money. we don't have a car, we do not go out to restaurants, don't have a cell phone, use computer for communicating. we buy olive oil and seeds in bulk, make our own salads and cook for the entire week, plus we use the bus and do not buy new clothes.

for some, this may sound a bit hardcore but actually my quality of life here is a lot better than it was in canada, not mentioning the difference in weather.

although i should emphasize that all this was possible because i was lucky enough to meet the RIGHT PERSON, i did some serious filtering before i felt that this could work, my partner happens to be compatible with my values, on my own i wouldn't have made it.

so would i recommend you to come here on your own? probably not, or not yet. i'd save at least 40K dollars there, because you can save that faster there than here, and meantime learn some spanish, then come here to some smaller town, buy yourself tiny apartment and go from there. i would not recommend renting here, it's a true pain.

chile and uruguay are more expensive because they are dollarized, brazil is a mess and will be for the next decade, so yes argentina is still a good bet for some.

best of luck

todikaios
5/7/2016 09:13 EST

And the "castellano" of Argentina is far different that in Spain.

TomP
5/7/2016 09:22 EST

My wife and I lived in Argentina for five years including 3 months in Buenos Aires. The Spanish is even different in BA from other Provinces. My wife lived in Spain and yes there is a definite difference, especially the double "lls". I once asked an Argentine repeatedly to explain to me, he only spoke Spanish, what he was trying to describe with the word "Shama". Come to find out he was referring to a "Llama".

Romaroast
5/7/2016 18:17 EST

i just wanted to say thank you to each of you that responded to my post. i have taken all your advice and thoughts into consideration. i have friends living in natal, brazil and have decided to try that. i know the country is a mess but which one isnt in reality...it also seems more likely to fit into my budget. i will be glad to have other expats there that can help and teach me the ways. i also dont mind adjusting to the lifestyle and economics of the region. thank you again!!

mariomesquita
5/7/2016 18:48 EST

Sincerely all the best!...cheers! Boa Sorte! Que Deus te acompanhe!..??

outofba
5/8/2016 16:01 EST

Great cheap cities

Chiang Mai, Thailand
Bucharest, Romania
Ho chi minh city, Vienam
Sofia, Bulgaria

SaintJohn
5/9/2016 01:36 EST

:)
When I arrivws in Buenos Aires in 2002 I asked the taxi driver to take med to 'Hotel Callao en avenida Callao'.

He looked bewildered at me ans said 'no conosco la calle'. When I wrote the address, he said Ah! casje Sjasjao!

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