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June39
2/16/2020 21:29 EST

My citizenship for Italy just got accepted. All the Italian laws are very new to me. My sister in Italy is disabled from a car accident and I really need to be with her at least for 5 months out of the year in Italy. I cannot stay at her house unfortunately she has a very abusive & controlling husbandv ( yes I tried EVERYTHING) to convince her to leave to get counseling and offered her to leave and stay with me) but she needs me. He will not let me stay there at their home. If I go out 182 days per year to be with my sister and just stay in a motel or season rental or even b&bair and I am registered under AIRE can I just stay as a Italian Citizen not resident and stay 182 days or under that amount of days to avoid paying taxes, for example taking a long vacation but I'm really there for my sister. I own my own company so I have employees who can run it for me. I have money to sustain me while in Italy. I cannot at the moment move to Italy as I own my Company and it just cannot be at this time. If this can be done I would love to do this and be with my sister. I will use the Italian Passport when coming to Italy & the American to go back?

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MrsVannelli
2/16/2020 22:25 EST

Based on what I've learned with dual citizenship from research and speaking with a lawyer, if you stay under the time limit, you can stay on extended holiday and not register as a resident. Use the passport for the country you are entering. Is your name the same on both? It only matters for checking in for the flight and getting through outbound security. Carry both always just in case.

We plan to stay for longer periods when we retire and learned we need not change status (AIRE to resident) unless we intend to stay. The suggestion was to pay out of pocket if you need to see a doctor for anything, since the only things we won't be able to do is participate in the national health care and buy/register a car without residency.

Go and be with your sister!

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Sergios
2/17/2020 01:21 EST

If you can afford to live in italy without the italian medical coverage, without your own car, then go for it. Your italian status is all you need to stay there.

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Umbertomar
2/17/2020 08:43 EST

You should obtain advice from an International Tax firm that has expertise in the Tax Treaty between the US and Italy. If you maintain a residence in the US at all times, you can be a tax resident of the US and a "resident" (but not a tax resident of Italy) of Italy, even if you are in Italy over 183 days. Here is a link to the treaty. https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/tax-policy/treaties/Documents/italy.pdf Take a look at Article 4 on page 5 et seq. This circumstance is very fact sensitive.

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rsetzer99
2/17/2020 10:40 EST

If you have a US passport you are always a taxed by them whether you live there always or never.

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June39
2/17/2020 10:54 EST

MrsVannelli Yes my name is same on both passports. Perfect for all your information and speaking with your attorney and passing the info on to me. I intend to stay on extended stays 183 days and not be a resident. I will pay out of pocket if I need medical care but I can also get medical coverage insurance from the states to use while in Italy on extended stay?

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June39
2/17/2020 10:56 EST

rsetzer99- Well I do pay my company taxes and quarterly taxes in the USA yes

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June39
2/17/2020 11:00 EST

Sergio's if I need a doctor or need the Emergency room it will be out of pocket. Would it be wise to get medical Insurance before I leave will they accept it there? Is it cheaper just to pay a doctor or hospital room without medical insurance that I want to obtain before leaving? Basically I have no health issues or take medication at this time.

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June39
2/17/2020 11:04 EST

Umbertomar- I will take a look. Very interesting point. If in fact it's what it is then I will stay longer than 183 days and have no worries

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MrsVannelli
2/17/2020 11:17 EST

Umbertomar, I saw this link the other day and read it. Quite interesting as we plan to keep a residence in the US but plan long summers as dual citizens. Sounds like even if we stay longer, if our vital interests remain is the US then we might not be tax residents of Italy. We did consult a real estate and tax lawyer and he did mention that there aren't enough resources for the government to track down everyone enjoying their holiday homes for longer than the 182 days...

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MrsVannelli
2/17/2020 12:31 EST

You can buy travel health insurance. From our attorney, he suggested finding a GP you like and paying the cash if needed. ER is basically free, as they don't have an easy way to bill you. A GP can order labs/mri/xray and prescriptions to pick up at the farmacia. Depending on what credit card you use to book your flight, you might have extra emergency travel coverage. I haven't looked into travel health insurance but I've read many people get it - mostly residents who aren't dual and need it for their visa. Also, if .you have meds you take, bring a list. There are many things a farmacia there can give you that require a prescription here. I've gotten anitbiotics for bronchitis and a UTI and albuterol from the farmacia.

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June39
2/17/2020 15:21 EST

MrsVannelli-I read that as well & spoke to a few people who live there and they said exactly what you tax/lawyer said.

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June39
2/17/2020 15:27 EST

MrsVanelli- Im keeping notes on all this to keep track of all this good info from you and other people on here. Your time is valued. Can I find the same presciptions in Italy like I have here? Same name? If not do you know a way I can order them to arrive in Italy? Sometimes the pharmacy here gives me only 3 months at a time, sometimes..

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MrsVannelli
2/17/2020 17:10 EST

June39 very good question about the prescriptions. If you have the generic name, you might have luck finding the same or equivalent. We haven't had to do as you suggest, but have had good luck with farmaciste in the past needing meds in an emergency. Maybe call your health insurance and see if they can let you get them early? Or have a friend pick them up and mail them to you (not sure how you would label that - have seen a lot of posts on FB groups I'm in that say mailing packages is a pain due to customs taxes).

As for the tax lawyer, he had a great example story, the gist is stay under the radar!

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maradel
2/17/2020 23:34 EST

You shouldn't try to import prescription medications from the US. It's illegal. You may not get caught, but if you do, you'll be in a world of trouble. You're allowed to bring a certain amount of prescription meds with you (in the original bottles and put them in your carry on luggage), but not 6 months worth. Just pay out of pocket to get a prescription from an Italian doctor. If you can bring a letter from your physician listing what you're taking, that could help, but it's generally not necessary if you have the original prescription bottles with you. Most pharmaceuticals are very inexpensive in Italy, compared to the US.
However, if you're taking narcotics or other restricted drugs (certain kinds of stimulants, certain other psychopharmaceuticals, for example), you will likely not get those in Italy, or most of Europe, for that matter.
Also, I believe you're required to have some kind of medical insurance when you travel to Italy, although no one will check. I would highly recommend that you have comprehensive travel medical insurance. Sh*t happens.

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rsetzer99
2/18/2020 03:03 EST

I was referring to Personal Taxes. The US is one of only two countries on the planet that taxes its citizens on a citizenship basis and not a residence basis. There have been cases of people who never lived in the US discovered that through some quirk they were actually US citizens as well and had annoying tax messes to clean up.

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June39
2/18/2020 11:16 EST

MrsVannelli- My prescription is for birth control pills. I do know of course they have those in Italy, but I like to stick to the specific brand because if not it messes up my cycles.. I will speak to my Insurance..

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MrsVannelli
2/18/2020 12:49 EST

June39 I agree. See if you can find out if that brand/formula is available there. Hopefully your insurance is understanding!

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