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Moving to Iquitos/school/banks

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amazoncruiser
4/30/2014 07:51 EST

I am new here, but not new to Peru. I met my soon to be ex near Iquitos 13 years ago. We have been living in US and she has just moved my children to Iquitos 6 weeks ago. I am concerned about schools for them She now has them in a place called Kairos Christian Acadamy, which sounds good, but she is moving them to a small public school in Santo Tomas. They do not speak spanish, they are 9 and 12, does anyone know about schools in this area?
Also, if I am not able to get my children back to the US for any reason, I plan to move to Iquitos. My job allows me to live anywhere I want so money is not a problem, my questions it, what would be a good bank to use as my monthly check is wired directly into my bank account? I will have half go to my bank in the US and the other half to one in Iquitos, I am not a resident of peru, but I will be there for 25 days and out of the country at work for 31 days, will this be any problem opening an account? Also can I apply for residency and do I have to working this kind of schedule?

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pistachio
4/30/2014 09:22 EST

This is a very complex situation. You could say to your soon to be Ex...."this is another fine mess you have gotten me into.
As far as education, healthcare and infrastructure there is absolutely No Comparison to the states.......your kids / not speaking Spanish,,,, really, big problem / how will they advance in school....
Banking in Peru - you need the Carnet de Extranjeria to open an account here. To get that is a difficult and bureaucratic process that will take about 3 months. You may be liable for taxes here and the States.
Your entrance to Peru gets you a 90 day visa and it renews itself everytime you cross a border out and back for another 90 days. This way you will be the perpetual tourist but you cannot bank. You could have a debit card from your US bank that would allow you to draw money out of an ATM with a limit of $400 per day / but you would pay fees to your US bank and the bank here as well. Interbank Globalnet ATM's do this.
With the Carnet after the trials of getting it, and that is IF you can get it your tax status may not be so good for you.
Iquitos is a pretty remote area so I do not know what is available there in the way of services. Additionally, I think you can fly in and out but there may not be roads for access.
I wish you luck but this is quite a tangle and definitely you need more advice than I can provide.

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WalterPedersen
5/1/2015 09:42 EST

Welcome to Iquitos. As for banking, if you get an account in Bank of America in the US you can use the ATM of Scotia Bank, which has a large office here with plenty of ATMs, with NO CHARGE to take out dollars--but only from BoA. (Otherwise it gets expensive.) Then right near the bank outside there are money changers. I prefer the two women in front of Interbank across the street from Scotia Bank. They will give you very good rates to change the dollars to soles. Although I have an account here (have residency as retiree/rentista), am not sure I really needed a bank.
As far as school, I suspect there are good private schools...maybe even bilingual in English...I would check into it. Or just get a really good tutor for the kids in the spare time to help them with Spanish.
You probably want to talk to Migraciones about your status. I think technically you can only be here 183 days out of any year...but am not sure.
We have a newspaper in English and Spanish called The Amazon River Monthly...you can see it on www.issuu.com/theamazonrivermonthly.

Good luck!

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davemoody8
1/3/2018 22:38 EST

I read that expats (US resident) can bank at Scotia Bank and at Interbank. I need a bank account in PE and need help. I had a Carnet that expited.

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pistachio
1/4/2018 02:52 EST

Best that you visit Immigracions upon your arrival.

Bring any old or expired documentation.

Be sure to let your US banks you are traveling in Peru so they don't mark any transactions as fraud attempts when using your credit or debit cards at A T M's

Upon entry you get a 30 day visa,

ASK for a 90 day visa at entry.

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Alpineprince
1/5/2018 09:36 EST

You will need to update your Carnet first.

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allianz international health insurance

For expats in Peru, choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our partner, Allianz Care. Their plans ensure that you have access to quality healthcare whenever you need it. Allianz Care's flexible solutions allow you to tailor your cover to meet your needs and budget.

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scumbuster
1/8/2018 19:23 EST

I have been using Charles Schwab Bank for years. They reimburse for all ATM fees. Just notify them travel dates before you leave the US. I know a lot of expats that live totally off debit cards and ATM withdrawals. At least until you would decide to be a resident a bank account isn't needed. Even if you are a resident, there isn't much of a need. I have lived for years in countries outside the US and always use a debit card. I would plan to have at least 2 or even 3 debit cards from different banks, so if one is shut off for some reason you have a backup. Lets face it.. Security wise I would rather have my funds in a US bank anyway. US funds are insured by the government.

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Jevn3
2/5/2018 10:49 EST

There are no roads out of Iquitos, all is by boat or plane.

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