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Best Pain medication available?

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GringoJeff
1/7/2014 05:36 EST

I take narcotics for migraines, but I understand they aren't prescribed in Ecuador. Can anyone tell me the strongest pain medication that IS available in Ecuador?

Also, is klonopin (clonazapam) available?

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Lorne2
1/7/2014 08:31 EST

Drugs, worldwide, are priced at whatever the local market will bear..(which is a function of local laws and the frequency of prescription). Its regulatory regime and prescription habits make the USA the most lucrative market in the world. To protect their profits there, the drug companies will give a different marketing name to most drugs. Your best course is to simply find the local South American name and format for whatever has been prescribed for you in the US. Often, a big Ecuadorian pharmacy will be able to help you with your list..but the internet is a godsend. (For example, an internet search reveals that Klonopin is a name used only in the USA..in SA it is called Rivotril. Pharmacists are also more casual with the need for a prescription and you will find prices are much lower. Just triple check the dosage.

Additionally, diabetic conditions, unless one clings to the same foods and their preparation as used in North America, will normally abate in Ecuador. So monitor yourself carefully and reduce or eliminate your meds for this condition as merited. You will probably have to restart when you return North for more than a short stay.

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mildoc
1/7/2014 10:32 EST

Tramadol and torodol (injection) are available here.
Below is a link where you can input drug names for this company…..generic names will work, not USSA trade names.
http://www.pharmacys.com.ec/Resultado_productos.aspx?mid=6

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GringoJeff
1/7/2014 12:24 EST

When you say that these meds are "available here," are you answering my question as to the strongest meds available? I will have to bring a small amount of my current meds into the country to help me wean off of them and transition to the next med, so I need to be sure this is it.

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GringoJeff
1/7/2014 12:26 EST

I'm assuming Toradol is the same medication as tramadol, aside from the injectible aspect? Any idea if the Toradol is more effective? I'm also assuming we're talking about intramuscular injections...?

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satyarising
1/7/2014 15:51 EST

I know clonazepam is available, but only from certain specialists like neurologists who have to give you a special duplicate controlled substance prescription. Only a few farmacias carry it. I live in Cuenca. Toradol and tramadol are very different drugs. Getting strong pain meds prescribed to you here in next to impossible. HOWEVER, I had chronic pain for many years before I moved to Ecuador. Within 3 months of being here, I was pain-free. No explanation, I just felt better after I moved here. I suspect it has a lot to do with all the toxic crap that goes into food production in the U.S. Best of luck. Hope that if you choose to move here that you, too, will experience an improvement in your health.

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mildoc
1/7/2014 17:44 EST

Torodol is NOT tramdol……tramadol is sort of like a synthetic narcotic and tramadol is a NSAID but more effective and has widely been used for many types of pain including migraines.

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USNseabee
1/7/2014 20:42 EST

If you're a TYPE 2, metformin is readily available here, as are all testing supplies.

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mildoc
1/8/2014 08:24 EST

Good medications are available here for medical conditions…….the biggest difference is the restrictions on narcotics for non-cancer pain.
What is "best" for a persons pain varies as widely as the people with pain and takes much trial and error to find optimal medications.
For those unwilling or prefer to not change their existing medical treatments, the option of trips to the USSA to obtain your meds may be the best option. alternatives such as seeking meds in neighboring countries, Peru and Columbia remain unknown if viable as options at present.
Some herbal treatments (including canibis) as well as optimizing your physical condition and modifying your life style remain options which may achieve good results also.
Vaya con Dios

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drbill
1/8/2014 11:48 EST

Through my 9 months experience here I have learned that Tramadol is as good as it gets. No opiates, nothing stronger. It acts like a mild opiate but is not an opiate, although tolerance develops quickly. I have built a tolerance (neck/back pain) and it is no longer effective. I am furious and do not understand that so many helpul medications are not here. Valium doesn't exist here but Ativan, which is far more dangerous, does. This caused a heated argument with an "esteemed" physician in Quito, not knowing I am a psychologist and addiction specialist. It's ass-backward here. In the meantime I have a friend in the US who sends me what I need, but that won't last forever. I hope like some of you others I just won't need them any more. If you want to talk to me about this I am an addictionologist and licensed, SENECYT approved psychologist, so feel free.

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mappam
1/8/2014 11:59 EST

Not a pain med BUT I did get a script for Valium (Diazepam) Called Consilium while in Cuenca.

Is codine available? This is over the counter in lots of countries?

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drbill
1/8/2014 12:02 EST

As far as I know it is not, however it is as effective as Tramadol - very weak - And I am shocked that you found valium. All the docs I saw said it does not exist in this country. Perhaps because it is in Cuenca where there are lots of gringos, I don't know.

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casadecuenca
1/8/2014 12:07 EST

DrBill;
From my experience with my better half, Tramdol is as good as it gets without knocking you out and it is dirt cheap,

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mappam
1/8/2014 12:25 EST

We are moving to Cuenca in March. We visited last Oct and we took our US meds with us and visited a Dr. to find out what we could get there and what was not available.

I have Essential Tremor - hence the valium question. Did not think to ask about the codine as I only take it once in awhile (recent knee surgery).

Maybe this will help somebody - the name of Diazapam in Cuenca? Hope so!

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drbill
1/8/2014 13:35 EST

Yes but you develop a tolerance very quickly and then need more and more and before you know it you have a monkey on your back. I suppose it's the same with opiates but it doesn't seem as bad. I have chronic neck and back pain and unless I take about 20 Tramadol it has no effect (and I don't take 20).

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mildoc
1/8/2014 14:04 EST

Diazepam (valium) is available in Ecuador……
Be careful with taking much tramadol as it lowers seizure threshold……...

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OceanHideaway
1/8/2014 14:06 EST

Chronic pain -- is a very serious issue and one that many of us deal with. It is something to keep in mind when making your move to Ecuador as the location you move to also has some bearing on how you will respond.

High altitudes will effect you and your health -- both the decreased pressure on your body and limited oxygen will stress your organs in an area such as Quito and perhaps Cuenca -- and that is something that can be subtle but pervasive.

Direct sunlight from the equitorial Sun can exacerbate issues such as lupus and melanomas and other conditions that radiant energy effect. And a sun hat or umbrella is not enough -- sometimes an entire house is not sufficient.

Inability to regularly get the medications you need is a serious issue as discontinuing your medication cold can lead to seizures and in a country were you do not speak the language a visit to the emergency room while in withdrawl could be beyond life endangering.

Consider therefore if in fact Ecuador is where you really should retire -- . These are the questions and concerns you may not hear on "those other expat sites" and you certainly won;t hear on the "Live and Invest Over seas" or read in "International Living" magazines.

Just a few thoughts about the reality of living in a foreign country.

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GringoJeff
1/8/2014 14:10 EST

Thank you so much for yet another confirmation of what I've been hearing... folks losing their needs for various meds. During my exploratory trip, I found that I had stopped some of mine as well. I'm hoping that will be a full or near-full reality for me as well (losing them all once I arrive).

GJ

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drbill
1/8/2014 14:15 EST

After searching high and wide and having 4 doctors tell me that valium does not exist here, can you please enlighten me as to how/where to get it? Thank you so much.

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drbill
1/8/2014 14:18 EST

That message was meant for Mildoc.

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drbill
1/8/2014 14:28 EST

GJ - PLEASE do not stop them suddenly. You may get severe withdrawal symptoms and seizures. Taper slowly. If you need help please let me know.

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mappam
1/8/2014 17:06 EST

DrBill = check above - I listed the name (in Cuenca) of valium/Diazapam.

Hope that helps?

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OceanHideaway
1/8/2014 17:19 EST

Diazepam is the generic name for the drug marketed as valium by the manufacturer Hoffmann-La Roche It is a benzodiazepine drug.

At this time, to the best of my knowledge as supplemented by my information from local physician who works for the Ministry of Public Health (Ministerio de Salud Publico) of the Municipio de Salinas, all benzodiazepine type drugs, as narcotic drugs, are not sold commonly by pharmacists and can no longer be prescribed even by the old triplicate receipt system used until November of last year.

At this time those medications considered narcotic psychopharmaceuticals can only be prescribed by a psychiatrist. There are limited locations where psychiatrists are available and for the Salinas area I am told (again this is second hand) you would need to meet with a psychiatrist in Guayaquil for an appointment and have that doctor prepare a prescription to be filled in the hospital where the psychiatrist has privileges.

I am waiting on a friend who has shown a possible need to refill his medication in this manner and I am sure as soon as this is accomplished I will have more to report of this procedure and if in fact this is the manner in which narcotic psycho pharmacological drugs can be refilled.

Other medications such as common medications for depression -- Paxil, Zoloft, Prozac are available, and anti seizure medications: Topomax (in its generic forms) Lamictal, are also available.

It should be noted however than many of the insurance plans available to Expats do not cover medications needed for what are considered "lifestyle induced medical conditions" and Depression is considered such a condition as is hypertension! So if you are taking these medications -- be aware that insurance in Ecuador may not cover the coast of you regular medications and you should take these costs into account in your plans to move to this country.

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mildoc
1/8/2014 17:55 EST

Link: http://www.pharmacys.com.ec/Resultado_productos.aspx?mid=6

The link above is for the medications carried by Pharmacys with the specific info for diazepam below.

DIAZEPAM
PRESENTACIÓN | COMPOSICIÓN | USO

Tabletas y ampollas | Diazepam (psicotropico) | Regulador neurovegetativo
COMPOSICION

Cada tableta contiene:
Diazepán 5 mg
Diazepán 10 mg
Cada ampolla de 2 ml contiene:
Diazepán 10 mg
INDICACIONES

- En el manejo de los desórdenes de ansiedad o para el alivio a corto plazo de los síntomas de ansiedad.
- Psiconeurosis, neurosis obsesivo compulsiva, delirium tremens y estados confusionales del alcoholismo, así como para combatir la ansiedad y la agitación en las curas de desacostumbramiento.
- Organoneurosis y distonías neurovegetativas.
Pediatría: Ansiedad y pesadillas.
Neurología y reumatología: Por su intensa acción relajante muscular, DIAZEPAN es eficaz en espasmos musculares que suelen
acompañar a la poliomielitis y a las afecciones reumáticas; lumbago, ciática, paraplejía, hemiplejia, parálisis facial.
Ginecología y obstetricia: Dismenorrea, aborto inminente, amenaza de parto prematuro, eclampsia, facilitación del parto. Por vía i.v. produce sedación satisfactoria antes de un legrado, una
dilatación, la colocación de DIU o intervenciones diagnósticas.
Anestesiología: Inducción a la anestesia y agitación postoperatoria. Para conseguir sedación antes de proceder a la disfibrilación eléctrica, cateterismo cardiaco, intervenciones de cirugía menor o exámenes diagnósticos, como endoscopías,
intervenciones oftalmológicas, otorrinolaringológicas, odontológicas y reducción de fracturas y luxaciones.
Tratamiento de las urgencias: DIAZEPAN ha dado buenos resultados en las crisis provocadas por los alucinógenos y en las
intoxicaciones por medicamentos convulsivos.
ADVERTENCIAS

- DIAZEPAN no es de valor en el tratamiento de pacientes psicóticos y no deberá emplearse en lugar del tratamiento
apropiado.
- Al igual que muchas preparaciones que contienen drogas que actúan sobre el SNC, los pacientes que estén recibiendo DIAZEPAN
deberán tener mucho cuidado mental completamento alerta, tales como maquinarias, operadoras o vehículos motorizados.
- Debido a sus efectos depresores sobre el SNC advertir al paciente para no consumir alcohol u otros depresores del SNC, durante el tratamiento con DIAZEPAN.
CONTRAINDICACIONES

- Hipersensibilidad - Alcohol
- Miastenia gravis - Glaucoma de ángulo cerrado
- Narcóticos - En glaucoma de ángulo abierto puede
usarse siempre y cuando estén
recibiendo terapia apropiada.
PRECAUCIONES

- Si DIAZEPAN va a ser asociado a otros agentes psicotrópicos o drogas anticonvulsivantes, deberá tenerse consideración cuidadosa sobre la farmacología de los agentes a emplearse, particularmente con compuestos conocidos que pueden potenciar la acción de DIAZEPAN, tales como fenotiazinas, narcóticos, barbitúricos, inhibidores de la MAO y otros antidepresores.
- Deben observarse las precauciones usuales en el tratamiento de los pacientes con función renal o hepática disminuida.
- En pacientes debilidados y en ancianos, se administrará la dosis eficaz mínima para evitar el desarrollo de ataxia o sobredosificación.
DOSIS Y ADMINISTRACION

La dosis se hará individualmente para obtener los máximos efectos benéficos.
Tabletas
Manejo de los desórdenes de 12 tableta de 5 mg a 1 tableta de
ansiedad y síntomas de 10 mg (o 2 de 5 mg), 2 a 4 veces
ansiedad al día.
Alivio sintomático en curas 1 tableta de 10 mg, 3 ó 4 veces al
de desacostumbramiento en día, durante las primeras 24
alcoholismo horas, reduciendo a 1 tableta de 5
mg, 3 ó 4 veces al día.
Para alivio de espasmo del 1/2 tableta de 5 mg a 1 tableta de
músculo esquelético 10 mg, 3 ó 4 veces al día.
Terapia coadyuvante en de- 1/2 tableta de 5 mg a 1 tableta de
sórdenes convulsivos 10 mg, 2 a 4 veces al día.
Pacientes geriátricos o en 1/2 tableta, 1 ó 2 veces al día,
presencia de enfermedad de- de inicio; incrementar
bilitante gradualmente según se necesite y
tolere.
Ampollas
Facilitación del parto, 10 a 20 mg IV o IM, puede
toxemia gravídica repetirse al cabo de 2 horas.
Infarto de miocardio 10 mg/IM cada 8 ó 12 horas.
Status epiléptico 0.15-0.25 mg/kg IM o IV; puede
repetirse a los 30 minutos.
Urgencias psiquiátricas 0.1 a 0.2 mg/kg IM cada 8 horas.
Tétanos 0.1 a 0.3 mg/kg IV con intervalo
de 1 a 4 horas.
Ortopedia y traumatología 10 a 30 mg IV.
PRESENTACION

DIAZEPAN 5 mg tabletas: Caja por 20 y 100 tabletas.
DIAZEPAN 10 mg tabletas: Caja por 20 y 100 tabletas.
DIAZEPAN 10 mg por 2 ml: Caja por 25 ampollas.

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Physician
1/9/2014 16:35 EST

Ocean Susan wrote: High altitudes will effect you and your health -- both the decreased pressure on your body and limited oxygen will stress your organs in an area such as Quito and perhaps Cuenca -- and that is something that can be subtle but pervasive.

When we moved into Cuenca from Sedona Az, (alt 4500 FT, to Cuenca 8500 FT) we were assured by my cardiologist in Az that the altitude would not be a detriment....We have been here starting 4 months. By the middle of the first month weakness and breathing problems were developing till finally after being referred to 4 cardio specialists at Santa Elena hospital here
in Cuenca, they found a hidden heart condition the remedy for which, by Dr Orders is: i must move to the coast or continue this degenerative destruction by remaining at this high altitude.I am presently on oxygen which allows me to walk again for several minutes, But the only solution is moving to the coast and not returning to these altitudes. Susan is right once again.

If you are using ED remedies and havent checked your heart function, get Susan to re write the paragraph in spanish that may save your life in a spanish speaking hospital.... Thanks, DocStJohn@esedona.net

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OceanHideaway
1/11/2014 14:33 EST

Mildoc --

Pharmacy*s, Fybecca, Blue Cross -- etc. no longer carry benzos of any type as of November 2013

If you do know of a pharmacy from first hand experience that continues to carry benzos, there are many expats who are extremely interested in knowing the name and exact location as well as operating hours.

These are individuals caught in a short supply when the new ruling by the MSP went into effect and are in serious need of medication to protect against seizures induced by immediate withdrawal without adequate tapering off.

Can you supply this information?

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drbill
1/11/2014 16:39 EST

Regarding Ocean Hideaway's message - I can tell you first hand that a sudden cessation of ANY benzodiazepene can cause days of torture, seizures and death. I had the unfortunate experience of 5 days of this when I ran out before my shipment came from the US, which probably saved my life in time. I would not wish this experiece on my worst enemy, and I could not overstate it. I maintain that you CANNOT get VALIUM in Ecuador. What you CAN get is Ativan and Clonazepam, both short-acting benzos, which would alleviate withdrawal from any other benzos and you can taper slowly off them. They are easy to get in Quito, perhaps Guayaquil, but not around here, and here I understand it can only be prescribed by a psychiatrist (not true in Quito), so it's here but difficult to get. If you are in withdrawal I suggest you get to Quito and see a doc there - almost any one will give you one of these drugs. It will be well worth your trip. But then plan on tapering down and off SLOWLY, because you will never be able to get a regular supply here.

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drbill
1/11/2014 16:44 EST

p.s. Fybeca does carry Ativan and Clonazepan, at least in Quito.

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drbill
1/11/2014 16:46 EST

to Physician: Can you please elaborate on the cardiac issues with ED medication?

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OceanHideaway
1/11/2014 20:45 EST

The issue is the use of Nitrate Drugs -- used for chest pain, angina, and other heart issues.

Often the first line of treatment for a person who arrives in the Emergency Room with what may be a heart attack -- but if given to a person using an erectile enhancement drug the two combined can cause a severe drop in blood pressure, which can lead to organ damage stroke and death.

Therefore, not only should any patient who is already taking a nitrate drug never use Viargra, Levitra or Cialis, a person is NOT using a nitrate drug regularly but who appears in the ER for a cardiac issue who IS taking an erectile drug MUST COMMUNICATE THIS IMMEDIATELY so that a nitrate drug is not given.

Some time ago -- I actually wrote out in Spanish a helpful note for men to keep in their wallets if they used these drugs so that IF they were in need of emergency medical care and could not speak for themselves, they ahd a chance of communicating this information to the ER staff.

Naturally all anyone has to do is write a simple message and use any of the newer translation programs -- and make themselves a little laminated Emergency Card.

On the other side you might want to also have in Spanish, contact numbers for a friend, contact in the USA and a list of your current medications and allergies (especially penicillin allergies!)

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satyarising
1/11/2014 23:30 EST

At least in Cuenca, Fybeca still carries benzos. Also hospital farmacias carry benzos. I know a couple of farmacias in Santa Elena area that carry benzos. It is difficult, but not impossible to obtain them legally.

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mrbumblebee
1/12/2014 06:29 EST

I think they call valium diazepam here.

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satyarising
1/12/2014 11:12 EST

Diazepam is the generic name. Valium is the original brand name from the 60's. It sells under the brand name Consilium in Ecuador.

For chronic pain there is another alternative, though quite expensive. They make and sell a patch that last 2-3 days containing a narcotic substitute that is much stronger than tramadol (Tramal). But, they are used for chronic, daily pain relief, it will run you $300-$400 a month, and requires special duplicate controlled substance prescription. This drug is called Stadol in the US, generic name is butorphanol. We were able to special order it from Fybeca a year ago. However, I weaned myself off the first month, and my chronic pain went away after living here in Ecuador for 3 months. Next to morphine, butorphanol is the strongest narcotic-like drug that I am aware of available in Ecuador. For migraine headaches, as far as I know, none of the modern anti-migraine drugs used in the U.S. are available here, sorry to say. For several years, Stadol was available as a nasal spray which was effective (somewhat) for occasional us for migraines, but I don't know if that is available anywhere anymore.

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drbill
1/12/2014 12:13 EST

No, valium is called Concilium in Ecuador, but you won't get it unless you're an inpatient with surgery. If you need a benzo find a doc, which is easy or hard depeding if you're in Quito (easy) or the coast (hard). You can get Ativan or Clonazepam at Fybeca. But I suggest you plan on tapering off it - It will be harder to keep getting it. I have my valium shipped from the US Express Mail. It always gets here but takes a month.

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swimmer
1/12/2014 12:18 EST

Does anyone know if it is at all possible to get Bio Identical Hormones in any of the larger Cities in Ecuador?

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shawnnn
1/12/2014 13:08 EST

I am amazed that this thread is still going and I have learned alot from this information. But to me the best pain medicine is to get off the couch, walk and exercise and take two ADVIL before bed. I watched my mother get addicted to pain medicine and watched her life spiral downward to her death.
This discussion makes me think about her addiction to these pain killers and makes me a little sad, because I believe it led to her early demise.

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drbill
1/12/2014 14:08 EST

One man's meat is another man's poison. Some of us cannot "just get over it." It's not a matter of will power, like alcoholism it is a brain dysfunction and requires outside help for most of us.

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jacmare
1/12/2014 16:31 EST

drbill, I hope that is short for Doctor Bill. We will soon be living in or around Salinas.
I am 72 years old and must take TEGRETOL XR TWICE A DAY and FOSINOPRIL pills for BP. Are either of these available or common to the Pharms in Ecuador ? Due to Uncle Sam I also have Lung problems. OK at low (sealevel) altitudes.
Please reply. Jacmare

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drbill
1/12/2014 17:54 EST

For Jacmar - Yes, it is Doctor Bill, but I am not a physician. I am a clinical psychologist and an addiction specialist, and I know a lot about medication issues. I believe that Tegretal is readily available here, I think (not sure) over the counter. I don't know about the other medication. I think Ocean Hideaway can answer that for you. Please let me know if I can be of any help.

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OceanHideaway
1/13/2014 02:15 EST

Satyrising:

What was easily available a year ago -- and even 3 months ago -- is not easily available today.

If you know -- personally -- of a location you can get these medication TODAY from personally going in and requesting and receiving these medications TODAY then you have answered the question.

If not, then your response is moot as the rules for the dispensing of these medications changed in November of 2013.

Again -- if you have personal knowledge of where these medications can be purchased CURRENTLY -- from personal first hand experience, please share that information here.

Thank you.

So far answers for Salinas -- as of today's date are None

For Cuenca -- none confirmed, no locations confirmed, no current first hand information confirmed.

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drbill
1/13/2014 05:28 EST

I DO have first hand information and Ocean Hideaway is absolutely correct. They are not available in Ecuador - including Quenca, or ANYPLACE else. Please do not mislead people without knowing the facts that might be considering coming here to live or visit and will need those medications.

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mildoc
1/13/2014 06:29 EST

And then again, there are some of us who consider the lack of availability to be a good thing………no that the medications are bad in and of themselves, but the use/abuse in the USSA provides good reason to exercise caution with these medications.
With some exceptions, they provide initial relief with tolerance building quickly.

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drbill
1/13/2014 06:55 EST

Mildoc, your point is excellent. But couldn't help notice the typo "USSA." Duck and cover? Seriously, the US is the most pill-popping country in the world. In my work with hundreds of people I have come to see how destructive it is on an individual and sociological level. Perhaps then, Ecuador's policy is not so stupid after all. It's already forcing me to exercise!

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drbill
1/13/2014 06:58 EST

I also want to out myself and let you all know that it is not just professional - I know addiction and alcholism first hand, so I really DO know how it feels. I want to offer myself to anyone who wants to discuss this privately. Part of my job, or mission, is to help those that are following the path I once did.

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shawnnn
1/15/2014 14:27 EST

Pain medication available as in Florida. If you need it that bad.

http://reason.com/blog/2013/05/16/floridas-successful-fight-against-pain-p

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Donna41
1/15/2014 15:39 EST

I am visiting for extended period in May and was going to bring my hydro codons (loratab) that I take for back pain. Is it legal to bring it? It sounds like I could not get more.

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mildoc
1/15/2014 19:05 EST

You should have no problems bringing in prescribed (and labeled) medicine for yourself.
Many of us have brought into Ecuador medications otherwise not available.

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drbill
1/16/2014 10:38 EST

It is legal to bring anything that was prescribed for you and you can prove that. But getting it here is another story. You will NEVER get hydrocodone here. If you can have someone ship it to you FedEx. It works for me with my meds that aren't available here.

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lakeparkcpl
12/12/2016 09:24 EST

I have a Home Purchase Contract (in San Jacinto) sitting in front of me for signature. As I was about to sign, something told me to see if I can get my prescription medications filled in Ecuador (near Crucita or going to a larger city such as Manta, Bahia, or Quito if needed).

I am on Social Security Disability (which alone should prove my need for narcotic pain meds). I take Morphine Sulfate ER (brand: MS Contin). The "ER" stands for extended release.

After reading these posts, I'm in a panic. Has anything changed in the last year that would allow me to receive this med along with others listed below?

Duloxetine (Cymbalta is brand);
Diazepam (Valium is brand);
Gabepentin (Neurontin is brand);
Amrix (muscle relaxant, non narcotic-don't know brand name);
Morphine Sulfate ER (MS Contin) as mentioned above.

I imagine the poster that is a psych professional can kindly answer to the psych meds?
The Amrix is not a deal breaker--but all others above are, I've been taking all of them for 10+ years and am someone who truly needs them.

I believe doc, and another poster, mentioned they have their meds shipped over. How could I do this, most especially the narcotics (Morphine & Valium) as here in Florida, refills on Morphine Sulfate ER are not allowed. So every month, I visit my pain management doctor and obtain a new script. (I am guessing there are no pain management physicians in Ecuador.) The Valium (Diazepam) script I receive has refills for 6 months, upon which time I have worked out to video with my psych professional for refills on the psych meds, but it sounds that a USA script won't suffice.

HELP please?

I'm open to any and all suggestions, even if they require a visit to Quito or Guayaquil, etc.

I am putting the Purchase Contract and container on hold for our family until I can get answers. The Seller won't wait for more than a couple days.

Thanks in advance to anyone that can be of help in my quest!

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Buddhaland
12/12/2016 10:34 EST

My heart really goes out to you! I am now on full SSI, but before that I was on SSDI for a serious neck injury that resulted in excruciating cervical radiculopathy, which I still deal with.

I now live in Guayaquil Ecuador, since August 2, and will be marrying my Ecuadorian fiancee in two weeks. My fiancee's brother in law is a MD, and is very sympathetic to my needs, but would not prescribe any of the meds you are currently on - and my experience is that no doctor will prescribe opiates to you here on an ongoing basis - only in a hospital setting, after surgery, for example.

HOWEVER - Tramadol IS available - over the counter! Go figure.....It is available in 50 mg capsules, and 50, 100 and 150 mg extended release pills. The cost is reasonable - but still considerably more than I paid through Medicare in the U.S.
Gabapentin is also available over the counter. I have found that this combination, is sufficient for my daily functioning, though total pain relief leaves something to be desired. I have long term yoga and meditation practices that help me immensely.

As for valium - I don't use it, but I know people here who have researched it, and everyone I have talked to says that it is unavailable, generally. There may be a few mom and pop farmacias here that will provide it - but evidently, none of the chain pharmacies, like Fybeca and Cruz Azul, even stock it.

As for getting meds by mail - I believe that is illegal, according to the Ecuadorian postal authorities. HOWEVER - a friend of mine mailed me some Tramadol, and I received it - but it took almost three months to get to me. I believe it had to go through customs inspection, and I am guessing the only reason it passed muster with customs is that it was Tramadol, not opiates.

For your sake, I hope someone on this forum can provide more hopeful information - but this has been my experience here, after consulting with two English speaking Ecuadorian physicians, and checking with many pharmacies.

I wish you good luck in your search - I hope you will ultimately be able to come to Ecuador!

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OceanHideaway
12/13/2016 12:35 EST

I should mention that the "psych professional" was not a very nice person.

He is also back in the USA living with his 89 year old mother in a condo in S. Florida where he continues to try to entice clients via SKYPE.

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donintn
3/30/2017 19:15 EST

for some, pain medication isn't because we sit on the couch and don't do anything, it's pain medication that allows us to get off the couch and do anything. For example my spine grew into a solid bone when in my 20's...talk about a pinched nerve. Because I am slightly hunched over, my muscles still continue trying to pull me back up to the proper position. This causes all kinds of other conditions, I have peripheral neuropathy which means everything below my knees always has that pins and needles feeling like when a limb is asleep and I have had both of my hips replaced, one of them twice - a total hip replacement - went into the or at 11:00 Monday, checked out and went home Tuesday at 2:00 - it's not that we can't deal with pain, it's just that there is just too much of it and without strong narcotics like morphine I simply can't function. I hate all the surrounding crap that is involved with it - like everyone thinking your a drug addict - but it has allowed me to live a fully functioning life and have done anyone else can do I just look funny doing it.
I was so excited about moving to Central / South America but this never even occurred to me. I thought these countries would be more enlightened than the U.S. but it seems they are less so - in order to keep those who shouldn't be using it from getting it, those who benefit from it are denied it.
So it seems I have a choice of staying here or risking jail and buying illegal drugs just so I can function - and as I'd rather not be in a foreign prison, it seems I am stuck here in the U.S.
A dream shattered.

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windshadow
3/30/2017 20:57 EST

We have been getting a lot of these inquiries lately.
The answer is "nope!" Nope on dope!
Seems Ecuador don't want to have to keep a supply of Narcan on board for those who abuse or over medicate.
You will have to find another place to land or stay where you are, comfortably medicated.
Not being able to get relief has to be difficult but then so is going thru withdrawal.

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OceanHideaway
3/30/2017 23:05 EST

Have you considered consulting with a neurosurgeon here in Ecuador?

Maybe the reason they use less pain medication is because they use better and more effective pain management therapies.

If your dream is truly to come to Ecuador, make it a dream of recuperation as well.

And I do not say that lightly

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windshadow
3/31/2017 00:00 EST

We have paracetamol most of the time. Sometimes they won't sell it, like if there is a bad flu bug going around and they want you to go to a doctor.

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donintn
3/31/2017 03:38 EST

This started in my 20's, I have tried everything from stinging myself with honey bees to whatever the latest available pain treatment was. Tho opiates have long term side effects , it has always been the most effective treatment. I have weaned myself off of it dozens of times to try various treatments drs recommend and nothing has proved more effective with everything taken into consideration. Dr's do not like patients like me. With me, the best you get is make me functional, you can't cure me. Every time I saw a new Dr they were excited, they love looking at my x-rays and mri's - few have seen a completely fused spine before.....they lose their enthusiasm quickly. Best you can see for improvement is what I have been doing - morphine.

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donintn
3/31/2017 03:42 EST

oh, and his was posted years ago but for a migraine, it has been my experience an anti-inflammatory , diclofenac, works much better than narcotics. Morphine doesn't even begin to touch the pain when I get migraines but diclofenac and a heating pad will normally take caree of it after a few hours,

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windshadow
3/31/2017 22:37 EST

I used to get terrible pains in the head but then I quit letting her come to my house.

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lakeparkcpl
4/1/2017 09:01 EST

donintn - I am in the exact same situation as you are except I don't have fusions in my upper back, just from L5, 4, 3, 2, 1, and S1. Morphine is the only medication/treatment (I've tried them all) is the only medication that can make me somewhat functional. I am on SS disability here in the U.S. We were under contract to purchase a home in Ecuador. But when I endeavored to find out if I could get my medications there, or anything even remotely comparable, I found that it would be impossible due to the government's control over narcotics. There is a cancer hospital that has 10mg patches of Morphine. But I'm not a cancer patient and 10mg (if comparable to the same in pill format) would do absolutely nothing for me. We had to cancel our home purchase. Best wishes to you and hopes that the medical world comes out with something that may help you function without morphine (and the side effects that come with it).

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WVolpe3
4/1/2017 09:49 EST

I am sure people will jump all over me a start fights because that is just how this forum is, but what you are looking for is Tramadol. It is Narcotic and available without prescription.

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remoore2001
4/1/2017 12:29 EST

You're right WVolpe, but it's pretty middle of the road as far as pain medication. It won't do much for folks who are in chronic severe pain. Also you quickly build a tolerance to it.

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remoore2001
4/1/2017 12:35 EST

Just for you folks that need pain meds and want to try tramadol, as a rule of thumb vicodin is about 6x stronger than tramadol.

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Buddhaland
4/1/2017 14:45 EST

After a severe neck injury, I was on various heavy-duty pain meds for years - vicodin, norco, morphine, oxycontin - and tramadol.. During a year in Thailand, all I could get was Tramadol 50mg., but found that I could get by on that. What I like about living in Ecuador is that Tramadol is also over the counter, and is available in 50mg regular capsules - and 50 and 100mg "Tramal Long," extended release pills. Still not ideal, but I can at least mix and match for days with breakthrough pain. I only worry that the law might change in the future and Tramadol will become unavailable here. I had very good success weaning myself off of pain meds before coming to Ecuador using Kratom, which I ordered in bulk from a supplier in Indonesia. It was also available locally in smaller quantities. Anyone know if it is available in Ecuador? I rather doubt it, though it is not tecnically illegal here, from what I understand......

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Buddhaland
4/1/2017 14:49 EST

After a severe neck injury, I was on various heavy-duty pain meds for years - vicodin, norco, morphine, oxycontin - and tramadol.. During a year in Thailand, all I could get was Tramadol 50mg capsules., but found that I could get by on that. I could get morphine prescribed my my doc in Phuket, but it was crazy expensive. What I like about living in Ecuador is that Tramadol is also over the counter here, and is available in 50mg regular capsules - and 50 and 100mg "Tramal Long," extended release pills. Still not ideal, but I can at least mix and match on days when I have breakthrough pain. I only worry that the law might change in the future and Tramadol will become unavailable here. I had very good success weaning myself off of pain meds before coming to Ecuador using Kratom, which I ordered in bulk from a supplier in Indonesia. It was also available locally in smaller quantities at a much higher price. Anyone know if it is available anywhere in Ecuador? I rather doubt it, though it is not technically illegal here, from what I understand......

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Buddhaland
4/1/2017 14:49 EST

After a severe neck injury, I was on various heavy-duty pain meds for years - vicodin, norco, morphine, oxycontin - and tramadol.. During a year in Thailand, all I could get was Tramadol 50mg capsules., but found that I could get by on that. I could get morphine prescribed my my doc in Phuket, but it was crazy expensive. What I like about living in Ecuador is that Tramadol is also over the counter here, and is available in 50mg regular capsules - and 50 and 100mg "Tramal Long," extended release pills. Still not ideal, but I can at least mix and match on days when I have breakthrough pain. I only worry that the law might change in the future and Tramadol will become unavailable here. I had very good success weaning myself off of pain meds before coming to Ecuador using Kratom, which I ordered in bulk from a supplier in Indonesia. It was also available locally in smaller quantities at a much higher price. Anyone know if it is available anywhere in Ecuador? I rather doubt it, though it is not technically illegal here, from what I understand......

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WVolpe3
4/1/2017 14:59 EST

@remoore2001 I have 25 pins, 3 plates, a metal elbow, 2 collapsed lungs, a partial splenectomy, broke pelvis in 2 places, degenerative disc disease in C5 and C6, a Severity 2 spondy, scoliosis, and 4 major head injuries. I know some things about pain. Next!

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remoore2001
4/1/2017 15:22 EST

Of course you do

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remoore2001
4/1/2017 15:28 EST

Just trying to state some facts for someone is on severe pain medication.
And you as usual try to turn it into a pissing contest. Next!

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WVolpe3
4/1/2017 16:30 EST

@remoore2001, thanks for proving what I meant by some people on this forum. I knew I couldn't just give advice from experience without the peanut gallery.

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windshadow
4/1/2017 16:58 EST

Wvolpe3,
My heart really goes out to you. No one should have to endure that kind of pain and not be able to shoot themselves up with some really strong medicine that would help. No one.
I have cronic pain in my rear from hemroinds. I even named my hemroid Wilson after the biggest pain in the ass I ever met!
Hope you get better soon. Remember, street drugs are real drugs! They are guaranteed to take the pain away.

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mootpoint20
4/1/2017 23:34 EST

I will soon be visiting and now fear I can never live because of the medication restrictions. Dr.Bill says he had trouble with Trazodone, an anti-depressant which I take, along with a small amount of Diazapam for anxiety, but there are no avenues open for either in Ecuador which closes my hopes for retirement at 68. Does anyone have a suggestion?

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windshadow
4/2/2017 08:53 EST

Mootpoint20
Maybe you could try some holistic breath works.

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mantatiger
4/2/2017 15:25 EST

I am not sure what can be done. You can purchase like a year supply from a Canadian Pharmacy for about what it would cost with insurance. Then just visit the states once a year and bring back your meds. Also there might be other options for the people with lesser issues, but dont know about the really bad ones. There might be other meds available in EC that can work for issues, but it might take experimentation to find what might work. For anxiety, hopefully a new location with less stress and better eating habits might lessen the anxiety. Also herbal remedies like Kava Kava might be able to help.

But sadly yes, moving to EC you will not have every drug available to you like in the States. And retrying to find that 'perfect combo' might take some work, but hopefully you can find a solution different than what you are currently on. Also finding a good doctor once you are in EC that knows what they have available to them will be key.

If you can, maybe come for an extended vacation like 2-3 months. See a doctor, try a different regiment. If you cant find a workable solution then you will know if EC is right for you.

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mootpoint20
4/3/2017 09:56 EST

Thank you for the commentary. Like all wisdom it is painful, but rock-solid.

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Grasshopper
4/8/2017 11:22 EST

We've relived this subject for years, and I am sure it be resurrected again, because someone will always have medical issues and need for questions to be answered.

As I have seen it, it was a wake up call. First time down in '12, I had my meds, and a refill in the states waiting to be filled and shipped.
Haha. Yes, .. do not do that. Not DHL anyway. Package will get to Guayaquil ..And then set up camp in customs hold for EVER. (and that can be dangerous.

As.of now, benzos are just not going to be available. I suppose different areas vary, but in Cuenca you used to be able to get Xanax , (or time released EC version called Adax... 1mg max for either. And doc could prescribe it, half the pharmacies carried it.

Not now - but I'm f you have an emergency.. go to Hospital Mt Sinai, 3rd floor, there is a nice lady pharmacist there who MIGHT help you temporarily. Don't expect any long term..

While on benzo info, if you were to catch yourself in a bind (like life threatening.. which cold cut-off can be). - here is your lifesaver.

Z drugs, like Ambien or Lunesta are not benzos. However, they do bind to the same GABA receptors as do benzodiazines. They WILL keep you alive. Now, there is one brand, having a brain fart on the name, but it is almost identical to Lunesta in molecular structure and action - and it may be bought over the counter. It sucks. Several minutes after taking one, your will get the most horrible taste on your tongue and no amount of scope will help. ...Still, you won't puke, have seizures or die. So ...that is as acceptable trade off I suppose. .This is only a stop gap anyway.

As for chronic pain?

HAAA!!.. ('scuse me there, sorry)

No hydo. Morphine for cancer patients, but not available like in the US. Tramadol, yes.. OTC, but even though it helps. It will lower your seizure threshold, go for goodness sake don't take them if you have seizures OR if you are "off" benzos for whatever reason.

Oxycontin. Yes, the pill that almost single handedly began the opiod epidemic in the States, that is the only real narcotic pain med.. but one can o ly get it from a pain specialist, in a hospital, and filled only at the hospital, and it is crazy expensive. Most importantly, the doctor can only treat a visitor with enough for two weeks.

I was on enough stuff a couple of years ago to stuff Elvis, Keith Richards and half of West Virginia.. but I stopped. After 20 years, I managed to stop.

Why? I like Ecuador. I don't like the pain. But I like being unshackled to a monthly pain clinic visit.

The trade off was worth it.

Hopper

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Grasshopper
4/8/2017 11:27 EST

Correction:
I called the lady on the 3rd floor a pharmacist.
No, that was a typo. She is a doctor - a psychiatrist.

Very kind and she does speak English if your Espanol is bad or worse...

That said, keep in mind most doctors do not speak it. The medical care is great - just very different, in more ways than "meds" too. They care.

H

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CalifDanno
4/11/2017 10:45 EST

My wife suffers from fiber and has had multiple neck surgeries. She's been on some kind of pain medication, pain blocks etc for the last 15 years - all with limited effectiveness and tons of side effects. She recently went to the Mayo Clinic where they have a 3 week pain desensitization program that was very successful. 6 months later she is off ALL pain meds, fully functional, and in moderate discomfort that is getting better with every passing month. I know it may not be for everyone - but I consider it a life saver for us. Here's a web link http://www.mayoclinic.org/departments-centers/pain-rehabilitation-center/overview

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Buddhaland
4/11/2017 13:30 EST

Sounds great - I wonder if there is anything even remotely similar in Ecuador. Or if Medicare would even cover it if I were still in the U.S.

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earlherr
11/20/2018 23:54 EST

Hello, I'm preparing on my travel and move again out of the states. I have chronic pancreatitis, along with other internal injuries. I take morphine in the states as I did while living in the Philippines. If I bring my medical records and current prescriptions would I be able to find Morphine in Ecuador like in Cuenca. Thxs!

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kmoriarty45
11/23/2018 11:26 EST

Full strength aspirin and earplugs work for me. I'm not big on medication of any kind but aspirin is my drug of choice.


Earplugs are the best and cheapest investment for damping down all the city and neighborhood noise. They're available in the hardware store area of Mi Commisarato ( sp ?) at the Mall.


Both my wife and I have them at home but also carry a pair when traveling.


In our travels, we've decided that the two noisiest cities in Ecuador are Guayaquil and Machala !

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abr127
11/24/2018 14:02 EST

Why not just visit a local Ecuadorian Doctor for about $20 and ask for his help?

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EARLABS
11/24/2018 14:50 EST

I AGREE BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY AND WE HAVE MANY DIFFERENT MEDS HERE THAT ARE NOT AVAILABLE IN OTHER COUNTRIES PAY FOR A DOCTORS VISIT.

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EARLABS
11/24/2018 14:50 EST

I AGREE BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY AND WE HAVE MANY DIFFERENT MEDS HERE THAT ARE NOT AVAILABLE IN OTHER COUNTRIES PAY FOR A DOCTORS VISIT.

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gyuris
11/25/2018 16:10 EST

One OTC pain medication that works for me here in EC:
APRONAX 275mg by BAYER
(generic: NAPROCEN)
Strong Analgesic & antinflamatory.
Dosage: 1 capsule each 6-8 hr for max 10 days.
* Always consult the pharmacist for side effects and contraindications *.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:32 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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Buddhaland
11/25/2018 17:33 EST

Yeah - Naproxen is great. You can save a ton of money on it though if you can have someone bring you a jumbo bottle from Costco when they visit - that is what we do. These stupid boxes with shrink wrapped individual pills on cards are expensive.

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xoneill
5/16/2019 02:07 EST

Where do I find Kava in Ecuador?

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Buddhaland
6/1/2019 13:45 EST

I used to take MScontin in the States for cervical radiculopathy. Nothing like that available here, sadly. BUT - Tramadol 50mg and Tramadol Long 50 & 100mg are available here without a prescription, and are not as effective for me, but better than nothing!
Tramadol is called Tramal here for some reason.........I agree about naproxen - we get an occasional jumbo Costco bottle when my sis in law visits from California. It is the best of the non-narcotic pain relievers, in my experience.

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xoneill
6/1/2019 16:24 EST

I have cervical issues too. What's the long erm negative effects of Tramadol? Byyond what's posted on medical websites? Your personal experience ?

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