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Moving to Dublin in July - requirements to rent?

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rmckeon
4/2/2017 05:02 EST

Hi! I'm moving to Dublin with my girlfriend in July and we'll be looking for a place to rent (just us 2, not shared), ideally D2,D4 or D6.

My main concerns are the following:
- How long on average would it take to find an apartment in the city? We would need to plan an Airbnb in the meantime.
- What do landlords ask you for when you're renting? I know they can ask for bank statements, payslips etc, but I also read about the PPS number. The problem is that to apply for a PPS number you need an Irish address...but I need the PPS number to rent an Irish address...see the paradox? Or can I just use the Airbnb address as a temporary placeholder to get the PPS?

Thanks!

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Joshuak
4/6/2017 16:30 EST

Normally you do not need PPS. If owner asks for it, ask him what he needs it for. PPS number is only used for Irish government transactions. It is actually illegal for commercial activities to ask for it unless it is for payroll taxes, etc. If owner wants identification show your passport. Be aware the owner may ask for you to have a bank account that automatically pays the rent every month. (Billpay) You do not need PPS to open a bank account either unless it is interest bearing account. PPS is for social welfare and taxes.

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rmckeon
4/6/2017 16:36 EST

Thanks for the advice! :)

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stephaguilera
7/13/2017 11:41 EST

Hi! I'm moving to Dublin in August and was wondering how fast you were able to fine an apartment? Debating on getting an air b&b and wanted your insight on your experience.

Thanks!

Stephanie

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Muddled
7/13/2017 13:42 EST

Dublin has been having a housing shortage/crisis for several years. August is peak tourist season. Try Daft.ie

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rmckeon
7/13/2017 17:18 EST

Hi Stephanie, here's my insight:

I've been here exactly 2 weeks, and found my current apartment 10 days after arriving. Prices are expensive, but it's to be expected when living in any city, especially close to the city centre. There's so much I can tell you so I'll keep it in bullet points:

- There's a lot more demand than supply, so the landlords/agents are very picky and only choose the tenants which they believe are most reliable i.e. best salary, best references, etc.

- If you have a job in Dublin with a good salary before coming here, that's a huge plus. If you don't have a job, you will find it very difficult to get an apartment.

- Do your research beforehand re prices, locations, etc. Daft.ie is the only site you need, everything is on there. First decide if you want a room share, single room, whole apartment, etc and start searching.

- As soon as you arrive start sending messages on Daft.ie on the listings you want to view, ASAP when you arrive!

- I know this sounds harsh, but agents are snakes. They don't care about you and will leave you hanging. A lot of them don't even have basic manners. So if you try to contact an agent and they ignore your calls/emails, it probably means the apartment is taken. That's what happened to me and I wasted 2 days because of it.

- Weekends are wasted - most agents don't work on weekends.

- Have your references and enough cash for a deposit ready in hand, the agent/landlord will ask you for them ASAP. If you don't have them, they might skip you and choose someone else. References = proof that you have a job, ex-landlord references, bank statements, anything showing you are reliable and have good bank credit. Deposit is usually one month's worth of rent up front.

- Know exactly what you want. If you view an apartment you like, you should tell the agent/landlord on the spot that you want it and that you have all your references ready. Let me give you an example: 5 days after I arrived, I saw an apartment I really really liked. I viewed the apartment at 5pm and told the agent I would think it over. At 7pm I contacted him by phone to tell him I liked it, but it was too late - it was already taken within that time!

- Get a temporary location before coming e.g. AirBnB. 2 weeks was just enough for me.

- Ideally, arrange with your employer to start work AFTER you've found an apartment. I started a new job during the week when I found the apartment and needed to move, and it was very difficult.

So those points basically sum up my experience. Good luck and if you need any help just message/email me :)

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