Home Ireland Forum Ireland Guide Moving to Ireland Real Estate Healthcare in Ireland
Ireland
Resources
City Guides
Cigna International Health Insurance
JoinSign In
Cigna International Health Insurance

Ireland Expat Forum

Advice on Moving to Ireland

Post New Topic
EvanMac
11/12/2018 17:10 EST

Hello, my name is Evan. I am posting this because all I know is I want to move to Ireland. How to get a job there all the from over here. I am the type of per that need directions on every little step or I will mess things up and probably have to come back home and I dont want to do that. Once I am in Ireland I plan on staying. So if anyone has a guide on a direct list to go by and possible as simple as possible I would greatly appreciate it.

Post a Reply

00abuse

FlowerFairy
11/12/2018 17:42 EST

Nothing in life is simple, there will always be obstacles. Follow your dream and take each step at a time.

Post a Reply

10abuse

expat health insurance from CIGNA

Choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA. With Cigna Global Health Options, you can create an international health insurance plan that's perfectly tailored for the needs of you and your family.

Learn More Get a Quote

DebAckley
11/12/2018 17:53 EST

Evan,
You may want to look at citizensinformation.ie. You didn't say what country you are from...if you are from the USA you will be allowed to stay for 90 days. Jobs go to the Irish and EU citizens first. The site I mentioned listed critical jobs list. If you presently work for a company that has a base in IE...you will have a good chance. Any chance you can get Irish citizenship thru a parent or grandparent? Otherwise, be prepared to have about 60,000 euros in the bank to make sure you are not a burden to the state. You may want to check with the Irish embassy in the country you live in ( DC in the States).
Cheers... ( I am a dual citizen and have lived in IE).

Post a Reply

00abuse

Joshuak
11/12/2018 21:50 EST

Hi Deb, Last I knew the requirement for non Irish/ EU/ EEA citizens was 50K Euro annual income from qualified sources, plus about 150,000 Euro in a Irish bank or ownership of a dwelling worth a similar amount. In addition they would have a requirement to buy health insurance. If they do not get hired by a Irish company for a critical skill, even if they had the income and accounts required, they would not get a visa allowing them to work. They would get the infamous "Stamp 0" which does not allow working. If they have citizenship via ancestry from Ireland, EU. EEA country none of this applies and they can come and work at anything they wish.

Post a Reply

00abuse

tneufeld7
11/13/2018 05:28 EST

There's also the general work permit you can apply for if you don't qualify for critical skills.

@Evan, check out my website, I have resources on immigration FAQ: https://makethemove.ie/resources/

Post a Reply

00abuse

EvanMac
11/14/2018 06:34 EST

All packages say Dublin. What if I don't want to move there but some place like Tralee or Killarney?

Post a Reply

00abuse

expat health insurance from CIGNA

Choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA. With Cigna Global Health Options, you can create an international health insurance plan that's perfectly tailored for the needs of you and your family.

Learn More Get a Quote

tneufeld7
11/14/2018 07:31 EST

Hey Evan. You haven't shared where you're from and that will determine your visa/work permit situation. Our packages are focused on Dublin (and big cities really) because that's where there are companies used to and preferred partners of the government for getting work permits. Most non-EU citizens can't just get a work permit to work at a pub or shop in Tralee although that would be nice! It also depends on your experience, if you're a neuroscientist and there's a hospital in Kerry you want to work at, that changes things altogether. In any case, feel free to get in touch via my contact details on the site and we can chat further to see if we can help you, we do free discovery calls.

Post a Reply

02abuse

Joshuak
11/14/2018 16:09 EST

EvanMac: Suggest you are careful about what comes "FREE". Many people out there looking to get into your wallet.

Post a Reply

00abuse

FlowerFairy
11/14/2018 16:22 EST

Yes, no 'free lunches' in this world.

Post a Reply

00abuse

EvanMac
11/17/2018 05:44 EST

I know and I am knew to this. I know that I will be visiting around February/ March. I cant figure out how to stay long term once I get there.

Post a Reply

00abuse

DebAckley
11/17/2018 09:56 EST

Unless you are a dual citizen or EU .. you can only stay 90 days. Check citizens information. ie

Post a Reply

00abuse

DebAckley
11/17/2018 09:58 EST

Yes Josh you are right 60, 000 always pops in my head as I figure that would be USD.

Post a Reply

00abuse

mskris1014
6/3/2019 17:03 EST

Just a question, if we are still residing in our home countries, how can we have $150K Euro in an Irish bank? Don't we need permits/visas first before we can set up Irish bank accounts? Also, would ownership of a dwelling in our home country count or if funds were in a US retirement fund account?

Post a Reply

00abuse

dbarnwell
6/5/2019 15:13 EST

90 days as tourist ?
Remember that the INIS can ask you to show that you have enough resources to last 90 days. What would that come to ? $10,000 ?

Post a Reply

00abuse

Mellis5910
6/5/2019 17:38 EST

Evan I'd suggest coming for a visit to scope things out first hand. There are plenty of books and online articles that can give you insight into what's required to relocate to Ireland. This is a good place to start: https://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/moving_to_ireland/

Post a Reply

00abuse

Joshuak
6/6/2019 15:39 EST

You need to understand what the Irish Government is looking for. Yes, you can open a Irish Bank account without a Visa if you are in the Republic and have a legal mailing address in the Post. So as you were advised, you can go there on tourist visa for up to 90 days to do that. And recently there was a US citizen that told about being asked if they could prove they had enough funds to meet a 50 Euro per day stay in Ireland. 90 Days would be about 4500 Euro or at today's rate of exchange about $5072 US. You could probably meet with Irish Immigration and open a bank account in much less than 90 days, but I would plan on at least 30 days. That could solve the 150,000 Euro requirement unless you can convince them the equity in your US property meets their requirements. For long term stay, you will need 50,000 Euro income per year plus health insurance which would give you a "Stamp 0" visa. However, a "stamp 0" visa does not allow you to work. If a person moves into Ireland and is working from their Irish home for a foreign company (US is foreign to Ireland) means that your pay comes from that foreign country which withholds taxes from your pay, then how does Ireland get paid for you living and enjoying their country ? The tax treaty allows only one country to get taxes from you. What you really need to do is contact the Irish consulate and ask them who you should contact in Irish Government to give you a better idea what can be done to meet requirements for you to immigrate to Ireland. It could be quite complicated under the conditions you describe. You really cannot get valid answers here on this forum. Lets face it, a move like this is not the same as moving from Virginia to Florida or something like that. Ireland is a separate sovereign country with it's own immigration requirements. Citzensinformation.ie has a lot of answers and is a good source , but I doubt enough to meet your complicated needs

Post a Reply

00abuse

Joshuak
6/6/2019 15:44 EST

Oh, or you could contact a Irish Immigration Lawyer.

Post a Reply

00abuse

mskris1014
6/6/2019 17:12 EST

Thanks very much for your thoughtful and informative response.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Expatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Ireland.

International Moving Companies

Moving to Ireland? Get a moving quote.


Mail Forwarding to Ireland

Mail Forwarding to Ireland.


Expat Tax

Expat Tax Preparation, Expat Tax Professionals

Join Today (free)

Join Expat Exchange to meet expats in your area or get advice before your move. It's FREE and takes 1 minute!

Expatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Ireland from our partner, Cigna Global Health.
Get a Quote

Culture-Shock-in-EnniscorthyAn Expat Talks about Culture Shock & Living in Enniscorthy, Ireland

An expat in Enniscorthy, County Wexford in Ireland offers a colorful culture shock report. He is a dual citizen of the U.S. and Ireland and offers some great information about the details of moving to Ireland.

An expat in Enniscorthy, County Wexford in Ireland offers a colorful culture shock report. He is a dual citizen of the U.S. and Ireland and offers some great information about the details of moving t...

Living-in-TubbercurryAn Expat Discusses Living in Tubbercurry, Ireland

An expat living in Tubbercurry, Ireland (aka Tobercurry) talks about residency requirements, finding work in or near Tubbercurry, cost of living and more. She and her husband love being retired in Tubbercurry and appreciate how welcoming the locals are to outsiders.

An expat living in Tubbercurry, Ireland (aka Tobercurry) talks about residency requirements, finding work in or near Tubbercurry, cost of living and more. She and her husband love being retired in Tub...

10 Tips for Living in Ireland

Expats living in Ireland say that the transition from tourist to expat is not as easy as one would think -- from challenges making friends with the Irish to the rainy, gloomy weather. Expats who make the effort and take their time are rewarded with life-long Irish friends and a love of Ireland.

Expats living in Ireland say that the transition from tourist to expat is not as easy as one would think -- from challenges making friends with the Irish to the rainy, gloomy weather. Expats who make ...

How an Expat Retiree Fought to Stay in Ireland

Expat retirees David and Maura Woods were given 7 days notice to leave Ireland. David shares his story, why they were asked to leave, and how they found a way to stay in the adoptive land they love.

Expat retirees David and Maura Woods were given 7 days notice to leave Ireland. David shares his story, why they were asked to leave, and how they found a way to stay in the adoptive land they love....

5 Tips for Tech Jobs in Dublin

Expats in the tech industry in Dublin live in one of the most vibrant tech economies in the world. Ireland's favorable tax policies and other factors have made "Silicon Docks" a magnet for tech firms of all sizes.

Expats in the tech industry in Dublin live in one of the most vibrant tech economies in the world. Ireland's favorable tax policies and other factors have made "Silicon Docks" a magnet for tech firms...

12 Expats Talk about Living in Ireland

Expats in Ireland talk about meeting people, expat life, cultural blunders and more. Some expats find it hard to make real friends and become part of community life.
Expats in Ireland talk about meeting people, expat life, cultural blunders and more. Some expats find it hard to make real friends and become part of community life....

Ireland Guide
Other Links
Our Story Our Team Contact Us Submit an Article Advertising Travel Warnings

Copyright 1997-2019 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal