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Arranmore

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expatuschristen
6/16/2019 11:48 EST

Wondering jf anyone has any insight on the call to US citizens to move to Arranmore to help rebuild their dwindling population? From what I am reading on the forum, it is quite a difficult process to move from the US to Ireland. I have read all I can find on their websites but it doesn’t say much addressing the citizenship or residency stipulations for anyone wanting to consider moving.

Thanks in advance for your input!

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expatuschristen
6/16/2019 12:14 EST

Apologies for any misspellings!

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mmccrane
6/17/2019 01:23 EST

It seems as though the population has been stable for years. Around 5-600.
What are your objectives in moving to a random small island on the Northwest coast?
To retire or just gain the experience?

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Mellis5910
6/17/2019 05:29 EST

You would fall under the same residency requirements as any other person looking to relocate to Ireland, I believe. They do mention having to sort out your own visa/residency situation -- and give a link to: https://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/moving_to_ireland/ So, that means there are no special dispensations...

The population has dropped and they are hoping to attract young families with children. The population stands at 469, of which only 22% are employed. The island was recently equipped with high-speed broadband in order to tempt remote workers there.

Here's a link to FAQ's about moving to Arranmore: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1g4bSwzBshNdc_3ch6IYRVBN4q1B67y8X/view?fbclid=IwAR3KdVOw-TJwKOWtwsuyUdovNcGbcZGTHLJK4t5a2-QFEEtUjORaqOesIG4

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Joshuak
6/18/2019 12:01 EST

They are probably looking for younger workers that already have legal rights to residency in Ireland. Citizens by ancestry or other EU citizens. Otherwise the INFAMOUS stamp 0 prevails. No work visa with that so why would the Island want someone like that ? I would suggest to you the island needs local workers for the tourist trade and not so much remote internet workers.

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expatuschristen
6/20/2019 09:25 EST

Thank you for your reply. Our reasons for considering the move are our own. I am not sure that is relevant to the discussion.

The call was completely open with no stipulations of qualifying to live there if one can do it legally. We are just hoping to get some answers on things that I have not been successful in figuring out with my own research thus far. Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated!

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expatuschristen
6/20/2019 09:29 EST

I appreciate the info! I saw the same things online. It would appear that they are trying to support remote workers, but after looking at the work visa guidelines on the government website, it is unclear as to whether working remotely would be an acceptable qualifier to obtain a visa to work while waiting the time limit for citizenship eligibility. I am hoping for some reassurance or clarification that it would or would not one way or the other so that we will know if this would be a feasible option for our family.

Thank you!

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expatuschristen
6/20/2019 09:41 EST

Thank you for your reply Joshuak. I actually understood the opposite to be true of their invitation.

The island has very few young people and the population is majority geriatric. As I understand it, they are asking for people with kids or who would be having kids to consider moving there to secure the future of their population. This would inherently discourage more elderly people, those who are looking to retire there who could qualify for a Stamp 0 visa, unless they have (as you mentioned) familial ancestry which might qualify them for dual citizenship.

From what I have gathered after my thorough research, that is not a stated condition of their invitation. Also, they are going to great lengths to improve internet access to help entice younger generations to the island. They have also pushed to form relationships with companies for remote work, which would indicate that they are not looking for people to work locally and take jobs from citizens who live there.

This is encouraging, but I am still trying to establish if working remotely would be an acceptable option to obtain a work visa in Ireland. It is not clear on the government websites and I am hoping to get help answering that question.

Thank you!

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Mellis5910
6/20/2019 13:08 EST

Christen, whether they will accept people working remotely is a question I've heard raised before but haven't really heard a substantive answer. I do know of some Americans who bought a home here and even shipped their pets over who were asked to leave and complied--despite the fact that they were being comfortably supported by the young man's online job. It is often hard to find a definitive answer to this sort of residency requirement question, unfortunately.

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pobauto
6/20/2019 15:15 EST

Have you tried contacting anyone on the island of Arranmore?
Also, maybe your nearest Irish Consulate might be able to look into the situation in Arranmore and give you more information about whether there is a pathway for you and your family to become residents.
Good luck.

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expatuschristen
6/20/2019 18:22 EST

Thank you Mel, I appreciate the observation. While it is discouraging, it certainly helps! I will continue to persist in trying to get an answer and will certainly share if I am able to get something defininitive!

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expatuschristen
6/20/2019 18:24 EST

Thank you for the suggestion pobauto! I have an email inquiry to the island directly, but they have been inundated with response they have not gotten back to me yet. I will absolutely look to the consulate and see if I might be able to get any closer to an answer.

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Joshuak
6/20/2019 22:21 EST

Sorry Christen, did you misunderstand what I said ? I said they most likely are looking for young people that can work there on the Island, but younger people that already have the legal right to work in Ireland. Since they have a shortage of young workers, and they do have a thriving tourism industry that the elder population may have difficulty servicing. I would suggest to you that remote workers with no ancestral ties or non Eu citizens probably is not what they need. US citizens DO NOT have any automatic rights to immigrate to Ireland. They must meet requirements same as any non EU / EEA citizen. I know that there have been people on this forum that believe since millions of Irish immigrated to the US in the past, then somehow Ireland owes any US citizen a priority for immigration to Ireland. The Irish Government does have a program but it only goes back to the Grand Parents of the applicant. If you have ancestry in one of several EU countries that allow Dual Citizenship, you may be able to get a passport from that EU country and then you would be able to immigrate to Ireland. If not, the Stamp "0" is what is left and one cannot work, even from home internet with that stamp. And of course several other conditions too.

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mmccrane
6/21/2019 02:00 EST

The fact that you are relying on this forum to make life changing decisions tells all. You have not done enough of your own research. Have you ever been to Arranmore?
If you are a US citizen only, your chances of being successful with a move to Ireland is not good. Do the research.

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MDIrish
6/25/2019 23:26 EST

We have the same questions. I qualify for citizenship based on my grandparents being born on the island, but my husband needs to figure out a way to keep his job in order for us to make this move. We have 3 young children and are both attorneys who can work remotely for US based businesses. But it seems as though at least for my husband it is going to be nearly impossible for him to keep his job.

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Muddled
6/26/2019 08:51 EST

It's unfortunate, though not surprising, that there's little clear information about this.

One thing to be aware of, if not already, is that the U.S. is one of two countries globally that requires its citizens to file tax returns even if they are living overseas and paying taxes in their host country. Some of us are fighting this. It's FATCA.

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pobauto
6/26/2019 10:52 EST

It is my understanding that while you have to file in both countries, you don't have to pay on your income in both countries - that there is an agreement in place between the US and Ireland where you only pay in one country.
Muddled, do you have experience or information to the contrary? This is one of those technical points that, should you move to Ireland from the US, you might want to engage a knowledgable accountant.

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Muddled
6/27/2019 03:03 EST

I don't earn enough to have to pay U.S. taxes, but yes some income can be taxed twice under FATCA.
https://klasing-associates.com/how-u-s-tax-laws-like-fatca-can-cost-dual-citizens-thousands/

Just one more thing to be aware of.

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Joshuak
6/27/2019 13:23 EST

I believe if you look it up, once you get your citizenship (Could take more than 6 months) and you establish a residence in Ireland, your Husband would be eligible for a one year residency card (Renewable) that is stamped #4 which allows him to work in Ireland. However, the question of taxes is not something that can be answered here on this forum, so you will need to see a qualified tax attorney or accountant familiar with your type of immigration. There certainly can be complications.

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texbucki
6/28/2019 08:53 EST

Hi folks. I went through the process of gaining citizenship by foreign birth in the US recently. It took 18 months to process the citizenship (consider that a minimum as I started to pester towards the end as I was preparing to travel and my passport was going to expire). Another 6 months for the passport.

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mmccrane
6/29/2019 00:59 EST

texbucki - that is one of the hot topics for many on this thread. It would be great if you could share the process you followed to accomplish this!

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kyotodeb
6/29/2019 07:41 EST

I sent in all my documents for Irish citizenship last April. They said it would take six months, but I actually got my citizenship four months later. I applied for my passport and got that in less than two months later.
My sister sent all her paperwork in and they acknowledged receipt of it in October. She still has not received her citizenship yet , so it’s been over eight months for her. We figured with Brexit issues things are taking longer,

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bflanagan
6/29/2019 09:25 EST

Hello; could you post the steps to obtain the documents needed to obtain citizenship by foreign birth ?; my paternal grandfather was born in Ireland in 1894, at that time part of the UK; he came to US in 2015 and is registered on censuses after 1916 as a citizen of the Irish Free state; my father was born in NY in 1927; I believe I need:
1) grandfather's long form birth certificate from County Roscommon, Ireland
2) grandfather's NY death certificate
3) father's long form NY birth certificate
4) father's Florida death certificate
5) my long form NY birth certificate

Anything else ? Are marriage records needed ? And can you confirm if they need the death certificates or only the birth certificates ? Thank you in advance

Brian Flanagan
Tampa, Fl

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texbucki
6/29/2019 10:58 EST

mmccrane- absolutely. As I have read in many posts, the Department of Foreign affairs and Trade has an excellent website that will walk you through the qualification and document requirements. The URL will take you directly to the site. - https://www.dfa.ie/citizenship/born-abroad/registering-a-foreign-birth/. Living in TX, US I had to direct my application to the Irish consulate in Chicago but depending on where you live, this could be different. There are several embassy's in the states and all will help you but only a couple can actually process the application. The documentation can be a real time sink and cost if you don't already have some of it. Most people don't have their long forms of their birth certificates and Marriage licenses much less the birth certificates, marriage licenses, and potentially death certificates of their grandparents born in Ireland. While the records in the states took a couple of weeks < $100 depending on how many documents you are requesting . The documents from Ireland can take much longer as I understand it(think in terms of months). My father had recently completed a lineage effort so I was able to leverage that for the documents from Ireland. There are somethings that will seem a little iffy, but the local embassy will answer those types of questions quickly. It was literally 18+ months once I submitted the application before I rec'd my foreign birth certificate. You will need this to apply for your passport so in my case that added another 6 months before finally receiving my passport.

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Muddled
6/29/2019 12:15 EST

Marriage records are needed so you can prove your relationship to you grandparent born in Ireland. Can't remember if death records are required. Best to check with embassy/consulate.

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kyotodeb
6/29/2019 12:35 EST

https://www.dfa.ie/citizenship/born-abroad/registering-a-foreign-birth/

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Muddled
6/29/2019 12:48 EST

https://www.dfa.ie/citizenship/born-abroad/registering-a-foreign-birth/

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kyotodeb
6/29/2019 12:52 EST

I got my grandmother’s birth certificate inline. There were two different sites that had the service. I paid about $27 using credit card and it came in less than two weeks.
I actually live in the town where my mother and grandmother’s birth and death and marriage certificates lived, is it was easy for me to purchase those at the city hall!
Once I gathered all the documents, I had my passport certified and my application witnessed along with my passport photos witnessed. Everything had to be sent into Dublin. As I said above, mine came in four months.

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kyotodeb
6/29/2019 12:52 EST

Oops! Should say online not inline!

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bflanagan
6/29/2019 17:55 EST

Thanks everyone for the info; I shouldn't have any trouble getting the NY and FL documents but where do I start to get my Irish grandfather's long form birth certificate ? He was born in Ruane, South Kilglass parish, near Strokestown, County Roscommon on 2/15/1894. Do you contact Dublin, the county or the Catholic church where he was baptized ? Thanks again

B Flanagan

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kyotodeb
6/29/2019 22:01 EST

I got mine online on this site I believe!
https://www2.hse.ie/services/births-deaths-and-marriages/get-certificates/ordering-certificates.html

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Joshuak
6/30/2019 00:09 EST

I got mine about 30 years ago but I was already a automatic Irish citizen the moment I was born as my Mother was born in Cork, and she was alive until 2010. My Oldest Son just received his passport and my Daughter is just sending hers in. We had all the documents we needed. However, in 2012 I spent 4 weeks in Cork trying to find records in cemeteries of 3 children that were born to my Grandmother that died before the family came to the US in 1929. I never could find the graves or any records. Forget about asking the Catholic Church as I saw several pastors and they referred me to Dublin. Churches do not retain records anymore. I eventually found out that 2 children were born dead, and back in those days if a child did not have baptism yet, they were just stuck in a unmarked grave. The third one was a 16 year old girl that died during the 1918 Flu epidemic and was probably buried in a mass grave as my mother said the city came by every morning with a push cart and picked up any dead and they never heard any more after that. The info I got was all records are in Dublin and there are people that do searches for a fee, of course, If one is living here in US, it probably is the cheaper way to go as even if you go to the records storage, you must pay to be allowed in to do your own searching. Yes, the Government charges you to search on your own. They did require a death certificate for my Mother in regards to my Daughter's application. I also gave her one of my expired passports, and she has my birth certificate too along with marriage certificates.

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MDIrish
6/30/2019 01:11 EST

Great info on this thread, thank you. I qualify for citizenship based on my grandparents being born in Ireland and have requested the documents to submit for my citizenship. It sounds like my husband could also work in Ireland on a resident card. Does anyone know what the situation would be for our kids if we moved to Ireland? Could they eventually get citizenship? Are they eligible to go to Irish primary schools even thought they aren't citizens? Thanks!

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Muddled
6/30/2019 06:32 EST

My Irish grandparent's birth wasn't registered as was the custom on the island she was born on. She was taken to the mainland and baptised within a day or two of birth, I went local parish priest who found the entry in their records and he gave me a baptismal cert for her. I then had to send that with a request (Dublin) for her long form birth cert. As it didn't exist I was provided a document which I submitted with her baptismal cert (along with other required docs) as part of my application for FBR. She was born in early 1900s. My application was made in 1994.

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Joshuak
6/30/2019 22:36 EST

MDIrish: The first step is to get your citizenship and passport. That could take 2 years or more these days. Once you have the passport you will need to come to Ireland and establish residence. You can bring your Husband and children as tourists. Once you establish a residence and have proof of that with a Irish Post mailing address, you can make appointment and take your husband and children to a Garda (police) immigration inspector, Once you provide the proof of births, marriage, and residence plus a bank account would be helpful, your whole family should be issued a one year residency card and the US passports will be stamped #4 good for one year which is renewable provided you still have the aforementioned residence in Ireland. After 5 years of continuous renewals all should be eligible for citizenship and Irish passports. I believe your children can go to school there, but I do not know much about schools as I was never concerned with that. Maybe someone else can answer that. I would think if they have a residence card they should be able to go to school but better check with someone that knows for sure.

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Joshuak
7/1/2019 15:50 EST

By The way, not all Irish Garda stations have immigration inspectors. They are scattered around the country. If you decide to see one at the Dublin office, be prepared for a long wait. It would be better to make appointment at one of the regional Garda stations that has a Immigration inspector. They usually are less crowded. It took us 45 minutes to one hour for my wife's Residency card and we walked out of the station with her card and for that category the card is free. We did wife's in Enniscorthy, Wexford County in 2013.

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