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Need advise on moving to Ireland

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rakeshinie
9/23/2019 00:58 EST

Hi All,

I have a job offer from Ireland and am trying to get an idea of the place so I know if it’s a good offer or not. Could you help me with the following please:

1. How much would the rent be for a 2 bedroom house? The office is located in Dublin 1 and my understanding is most people live in Dublin itself (but do correct me if that’s not the case). I went to sites like myhome.ie and such houses cost around 2000-2500 euros. I understand there is a housing crisis in Ireland, are these the typical rates nowadays?

2. Am relocating from Dubai actually, and blown away by the taxes. Losing nearly 40% of the salary in taxes, wow! What does one get out of it? Free education, health care etc? My wife and child will be coming with me so would be good to know if I get any of these free and can take that into account.

3. Anything else to bear in mind while negotiating. I work in the IT industry and the proposed amount is around 85k euros per year. That seems to be at the average or slightly below via a quick Google. I am trying to decide if that’s a good deal and if the relocation is worth it. Any suggestions, pointer, previous posts where such questions are answered would be most welcome.

Thanks.

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Muddled
9/23/2019 13:01 EST

If you search the Ireland forum on this site you will probably find out a lot if information,

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dbarnwell
9/24/2019 07:26 EST

85k does not convince me as a salary. It is a bit tight. If you are happy where you are I'd say stay put.
One thing I would miss in Dubai is cool and damp weather. That would be a motive for going to Ireland.
Can't think of any other.

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DebAckley
9/24/2019 21:01 EST

Dublin is very expensive...many folks live outside of the area...and commute.
Taxes are high...not sure what you will get...even though it has universal health care...many folks choose to supplement with private insurance.
Check citizens information.ie for more info.
Any chance you can take a few days and fly over..to get a feel...
deb

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Joshuak
9/25/2019 08:55 EST

According to the Irish Times, Ireland has the third highest cost of living in the European Union. Average summer never sees temperatures above 21 C. Rain and damp weather are common but Ireland does not get much more than New York City. It is just how it gets it. I remember one winter I was there and a weather system blew in from the Atlantic and it lasted 5 days of light to moderate rain, wind, and 3 C day and night. Try that for a while and you will wish to be back in the mid east.

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Joshuak
9/25/2019 09:30 EST

I may not be up to date on the "free" healthcare, but I believe you will be required to buy Insurance for at least the first year before you can get Irish Insurance which is cheaper. And be aware if you have any "pre existing conditions", those may not be covered for 5 years. I believe the "Free" healthcare would not be available for people with salaries above 40 K Euro. Hence, high cost of living. In addition, be aware you should not pay anyone for deposits on a rental property until you actually see it in person.

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DebAckley
9/25/2019 09:56 EST

I agree with Johuak...free healthcare is after living in IE for a year from what I recently read.

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DebAckley
9/25/2019 09:57 EST

As far as education ....the national schools are "public schools" and Catholic. If you do not want your child to attend a religious school, then you would need to look for a private school.

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Muddled
9/25/2019 13:27 EST

Just for the record:
- Ireland does not currently have "universal health care"; it is a two tier system of public and private.
-Free healthcare in Ireland is only for those with a full medical card, for which they are assessed on their income, often people on social welfare or short working hours and low wages. Previously there were "discretionary" medical cards, where certain medical conditions were considered along with lower income, i.e. lowered paid worker with dependants and multiple ailments that require frequent GP visits.
- There is a plan for some form of universal healthcare, called "Slaíntecare" but whether this will ever happen is for anyone to guess. Universal healthcare in Ireland with the current public system would put health insurers in Ireland out of business. I don't know where a poster read one gets free medical care in Ireland after one year of living here; that's nonsense.

Anyone would have some culture shock moving from Dubai to Ireland, weather and lifestyle alone.

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Muddled
9/25/2019 13:50 EST

Income limits for a full medical card:
Under 65/ 66,
living alone = €184 per week
SIngle person, living with family=€165
Married/cohabiting couple = €266.50
Single parent family w/dependants = €266.50
You will see the income limits are low. They are slightly higher for the GP only card.

Many of us earn too much for medical card/GP visit and not enough to afford private insurance. I can vouch, healthcare in Ireland is NOT free for many of us, though the public system is affordable with outrageous long waiting times.

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Joshuak
9/25/2019 20:22 EST

Muddled: Please read again what I wrote. I said,and I believe it is still true that anyone immigrating to Ireland would have to buy expensive insurance from outside Ireland as Irish commercial insurers will not insure unless a person one is resident for one year. At that point they would be allowed to PURCHASE health insurance from Irish companies which would be CHEAPER than from international companies. The word CHEAPER does not mean FREE. People that are "Dual" by ancestry, and were residents in Ireland and we had income low enough, we could get a medical card. I was not sure where the cutoff point is but I suppose it fits into the numbers you supplied. But I did not suggest EVERYONE qualified for "Free" insurance once they were resident for one year. This only applies to the ability to BUY Irish insurance. One person I spoke on the phone with in US that wanted to move to Ireland with no ancestry was willing to show they had the 50K Euro income but was quite concerned about the $1600 US (1460 Euro) per month quoted by a international insurance company, Yet if they could get by the first 12 months, they had a quote of about 400 Euro per month from a Irish company. I think Deb might have left out the details. But no one believes EVERYONE will get a free medical card for just having residency for one year. I would suppose that is one of the reasons the Irish government wants non - Irish retirees to prove they have 50K income per person so they can pay their own insurance cost. And of course in addition, if one has a pre condition, the insurers can make them wait 5 years before they will cover that.

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Muddled
9/26/2019 08:49 EST

JoshuaK that comment wasn't directed to you at all. I have to admit I forget names (Muddled by name, muddled by nature); it was DebAckley's comment I was referring to.

Often people that don't live in Ireland (especially Americans, of which I am one) think healthcare across Europe is the same and often refer to Ireland as having "universal healthcare".

I am not looking to argue, I am only trying to clarify things for those that come to this forum.

Hope everyone enjoys the rest of their week.

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Muddled
9/26/2019 12:55 EST

P.S. The point of my comments were to let the original poster know what we get for a forty percent tax rate; he asked free education, free healthcare. Was clarifying re healthcare, which for most is not free.

Also someone mentioned that public schools are Catholic; that was mainly true for decades but now Ireland is very much separating church and state and many public schools are non-denominational. See "Educate Together schools". It's a work in progress though.

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Joshuak
9/26/2019 22:14 EST

Yes, I had an idea your reference was about what Deb said, and not myself. She meant well I am sure and has not been aware of the present healthcare situation. I never thought I would be able to get "Free" government medical card. I always knew that. I only spent a bit over a year living there with no intentions of ever staying for life. We just put the hurricane window shutters on our house in Florida and leased a rental for one year. But we returned to the US half way through the year so as to see our primary care Doctor to meet requirements of not being away from our insurance more than 6 months. Our insurance covered us for emergencies in Ireland, but long term or routine care would not be covered. Then we went back for the remainder of the year + a bit more. We wanted to experience living in Ireland and be able to travel inexpensively to other countries in Europe. My Mother came to the US from Cork City when she was 16 years old and often told us when we were children about how it was to live there back then. In the 1970s she used to be a member of the Irish Club in Boston that used to charter a plane and the members would fill it and fly over. She would visit family that still lives and work there. (Bantry Bay area). I had visited many times over the years, even before I got my passport which was about 30 years ago. However, I knew enough to not have any plans to stay as I knew healthcare was and will continue to be a serious problem in Ireland. I never had to visit a medical facility while we were there, but I did get some dental work done which was more or less the same price ranges as in Florida. If the person looking at moving to Ireland has a chance to negotiate his employment offer, he should insist on the company paying for his family's health insurance. But he needs to understand that even though he pays that 40 % tax, he will probably never get any FREE healthcare from the government But as others have said, he will certainly get some damp and cold weather.

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rakeshinie
9/29/2019 15:14 EST

Thank you everyone for the replies. Sorry for not chipping in earlier. I had setup a notification for replies but those were going into spam and I just noticed it today.

I was hoping for a change of weather from sunny Dubai, but looks like Ireland's at another extreme in terms of weather (rain etc.) I must try and visit before making a decision.

Thanks for the info on healthcare and education too, and the suggestion to try and get my employer to pay part of these. Looks like these are items I must factor into my decision. It's a pity the 40% tax isn't getting me much in terms of benefits. :-/

Regards.

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