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If Lithuanian wants to grow and prosper

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rikmo
4/28/2016 07:51 EST

If Lithuanian truly wants to grow and prosper, it really needs to realize and consider a few things. The first thing is language - nobody wants to learn Lithuanian unless they really, badly need to. Yes - it a proud, ancient language, but it is not very useful for business or communicating with the world outside of Lithuania. Lithuania's population is slowly decreasing every year, because some of its best people can find better employment and opportunities if they leave it. Almost every Western country migrant I have met seems to finally get sick of Lithuania and leaves after trying to live here for a few years - their complaints usually involve the poor level of opportunities, discrimination, and the overbearing level of bureaucracy and depression that they have to deal with here. Lithuania is a nice, beautiful country filled with priekabus people who make it difficult for newcomers. My solution would involve a massive effort for Lithuanians to learn at least English at a much higher level, provide attractive conditions for foreigners to come here and live without the gudrus attitudes towards preying upon them, and stop advertising and bragging about how great they are. Lithuania has a reputation as a country that is all "show" and no "go". If you can't slow the tide of your own people leaving, then try to attract the best from other countries to come here. This does not mean losing your own identity, it means evolving in a changing world.

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eekalnins
5/2/2016 10:44 EST

I think this is true also for Latvia. They insist on everybody speaking Latvian and also having all signs in Latvian as well. What is a foreigner supposed to do? Before WWII you had to know three languages if you worked somewhere dealing with the public – Latvian, Russian and German. Now it should be English instead of German.

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rikmo
5/3/2016 07:10 EST

I agree with you eekalnins. The main problem with these small republics is that they "want their cake and eat it too".
They want to retain their identities and cultures, but hey balk at attracting people from outside if these people want to keep a bit of their own culture.. A good example is the Danish Espersen company in the Klaipedae FEZ zone. They have been allowed to retain the more employee-friendly activities like paying for extra work or overtime that the Lithuanian Labour Laws prohibit, and the people who work there love their jobs. This is something Lithuania has to learn - to treat people well, because if they continue as they do - they will simply lose more and more.

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rikmo
5/3/2016 07:26 EST

Yes eekalkins, we have to welcome in other people to the Baltics, but we can't.
They don't even know we exist, and the respective governments make sure that if they they do - they should either avoid us or give us money. That is so cheap and disreputable. The Baltic's should rise to the occasion, with forests full of nonrenewable biofuels and much more. If the Baltics decide to become losers - this is their own decision - they have to stop whining and crying, begging and get to work!

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MemelSand
5/27/2016 10:22 EST

Hello, Ri?ard (mean Rikmo).
How's your wife, how your new home UK? Greetings from "priekabus" one, but to be honest it is difficult to be "priekabus" dealing with such a person from far abroad (UK now, and originally US) who became a genuine troll.
Did your wife convince you to wear a colorado ribbon? :) Judging by your passionate lecturing she did. Or you did choose that voluntarily, Well, never mind.
Just 2 humble observations: if you're so extremely happy in your UK (as you pointed out many times in many places) - why do you care about our backward LT? It takes time for you to post your "lectures" everywhere, and those "lectures" make zero effect after all.
And the second one. I have read your whining and crying, well, not impressed. Mature american male is supposed to be more ... (looking for a polite word)... wise, or something. To be not so brainwashed by RT or something. So your childish complaints will remain just childish complaints. And your trolling will remain just another trolling, among many others. I could give you a wise advice - but you won't listen to it, so I don't bother :) . Good luck, Ri?ard, hope you will find your happiness :) . Simply don't choose the country which is small and backward, and do not even think about such countries, it is spoiling the nervous system ;) (this is not a wise advice, just a valediction)

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bigEd
10/31/2016 15:26 EST

Rik, I 'hear' what you are saying, but, I don't agree with your posting. I have lived in a few countries. I will say you have not. Logic will dictate that in order to make friends ( anywhere ) you will shoe in easier by SPEAKING THE LANGUAGE !! Anyone who wants to GROW and PROSPER in a new country needs to do exactly that. I've been there. It is clearly understood, to me.

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chatrbd98
11/1/2016 13:44 EST

OK. I am not Lithuanian. However, having made 19 visits to Lithuania over the past 18 years, I have a couple of observations...When I first went to LT, not many people spoke English fluently at all. This was shortly after LT withdrew from the USSR, a situation where the LTs were made to speak Russian in all business, educational, and public occasions. There were far more Russian teachers in the schools than English teachers. Very few people spoke English and I had difficulty communicating. Now that trend is
almost reversed and almost everywhere you go, the younger (younger than 40 yo or so) are fairly fluent in English...and I can speak with many more people in English. Over the years, I have become fairly fluent in Lithuanian as well and that opened up conversation with many of the older people (50- 60 yo). Most of the people older population had to use Russian as the official language but at home spoke their native language...probably pretty typical of all of the "iron curtain" countries.

But now, as the country is turning more to the west, and the need to speak English for business increases, most of the under 40 population speaks English fluently.

My wife speaks Lithuanian, Russian, Latvian, and English pretty much equally well. My granddaughters who live near Kaunas are speaking Lithuanian and fluent English and are beginning to study German.

I do understand there are some cultural issues but I think most of them also go back to the Soviet times where many times the only was to get things done was to "bribe" officials and buy whatever was available.

However, I have seen great positive change in LT over the years and always enjoy going and visiting and speaking both Lithuanian and English, shopping in "American" style grocery stores and malls, but still taking in the Lithuanian culture and heritage as much as an American is able to.

The only thing I don't like is winter time is so dark!!! But the trade-off
summer is so light!!!

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Manola
4/19/2017 06:33 EST

I've been livin here for about a year and I love it. i don't know where you find those people, who cannot speak English - everyone speaks English to me if I ask something. Of course you cannot blame elderly people for not knowing English, and they don't have to know it! Change your attitude.

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labas
6/17/2017 15:44 EST

rikmo, seeing your attitude, I am not surprised by your lack of luck in Lithuania. Who are you to tell a foreign nation how they need to live? You are supposed to be "the polite english speaker" unlike the "rude eastern Europeans", but look at your language, it makes me sick. I don't know how old you are, probobly old enough to have figured that out already, but let me share this with you. There is no country in the world, where English teachers are in a position to dictate orders. I have worked as an English teacher in many western countries and I am actually speaking from experience. You don't have any special skills and it's no one's fault - only your own. You need Lithuania and not Lithuania needs you, so YOU have to adapt. "Nobody wants to learn their language" - who cares what you want? You speak as if you had the skills to separate siamese twins. You are saying Lithuanians need to "invest massive effort" (LOL) in order to adapt to newcomers like you and learn better English. What kind of massive effort have YOU invested to achieve something in Lithuania? Judging from your posts in the forum, 10 years on, you haven't even learnt the language or learnt a new skill to get out of English teaching. But everyone needs to invest "a massive effort" in order to adapt to his majesty the english teacher. Grow up man. You've been moaning on this forum for 10 years, time to do yourself a favour and try harder. Don't be lazy.

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palacedeano
8/15/2017 01:46 EST

I'm English married to a Lithuanian Woman with a 4yr old. I run my own business here so don't really interact daily with lithuanians. I am taking lessons to learn but it is very difficult. Generally the people here i have found are pretty unfriendly but once you know them they are extremely nice people. We live here because compared to Dubai where we moved from it is extremely cheap to live however the red tape in terms of banking etc is a little hard. It's nice that the Lithuanian people are proud and stick to they culture and there is no welfare state for immigrants coming in, meaning the country is relatively safe. That said if you don't speak fluent lithuanian you are going to struggle here socially

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