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moving to mexico, lots of questions

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aperez0713
12/30/2009 17:35 EST

My husband was born in michoacan Mexico and his family still owns a house there but other than distant relitives everyone lives here now, they moved to the us when he was 7 years old and he doesn't remember much about living there. He is currently serving a sentence in prison and will be deported as soon as his time is served in 2013 or maybe a little bit sooner. I will be moving there with him at that point because I couldn't imagine life without him but we are both really scared. I was wondering what I will need to do and or get to be able to legally live in Mexico with him? And would I legally be able to work? And his family tells me that where he is from is really nice but I don't know, does anyone know if that is a safe/nice area to live? Also will I be able to bring all our belongings with me when I go or will that be a problem? Those are just a few of the questions we have, I would really appriciate any help and advice anyone could give to us. Thank you so much

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RVGRINGO
12/31/2009 10:30 EST

Michoacan is a beautiful part of Mexico and we love visiting there. However, there is drug cartel trouble and some occasional violence. Anyone even remotely involved in that sort of thing is in serious danger; others are not. Employment prospects may be pretty dim.
You will need proof of marriage, passport, birth certificates, bank statements, etc. in order to apply for an FM3 or FM2 visa as the spouse of a Mexican citizen. You will also need his documents, as well.
It would be wise for you to go to the nearest Mexican Consulate and discuss your situation so that they can give you the details that you will need. If your husband is also wanted in Mexico, the situation could change.
Who occupies the house in Michoacan now? Will they turn it over to your husband? If not, it can take several years to evict squatters and only the deeded owner would have a chance of doing that long and expensive process. You have a difficult situation and it might be better for your husband to go to Michoacan ahead of you, get himself settled and employed and then send for you. There is no safety net for you in Mexico.

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aperez0713
12/31/2009 18:01 EST

Thank you so much for writting back with your advise. As for your questions right now no one is living in their house there, his brother just got back from visiting and said that their dad (who moved back a couple of years ago) has been fixing up the house to get ready for us when we come. Pedro (my husband) and his Dad are not close but I know that he will help us when we get there and that does make me feel better. My mother in law always tells us that he needs to start his own little business, like a bakery or resturant or something and then I could work there. Do you think that is realistic or just silly? But worst case senerio I know Pedro's grandparents have a big farm and there is alot of work to do there so that will be at least some income. So I guess he does have some family their, just not much. And no he is not wanted in Mexico, he was only 7 years old when he came to the US so I know he was never in trouble there in Mexico. I don't know alot of people tell me that I am going to love it and then alot of people say that it is real bad. I guess I won't know until I go. Oh one last thing. what is the difference between a fm3 and a fm2, I really don't know anything. Thanks so much for the help

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tlaxcalaguide
12/31/2009 19:37 EST

Hey aperez... don't let "its really bad" talk scare you. And yes starting a small business is a very good idea. I came down 40 years ago with $500 bucks in my pocket and I¿m still here.Your husband needs to start getting papers together also...he needs to get a C.U.R.P. card...its not hard to do. You will need an FM3 visa for 3 years then an FM2 visa for two years after which you can apply for naturalization... then you won't have to mess with immigration anymore in Mexico. Think positive and many expats know how you feel...God bless & happy new year.

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RVGRINGO
12/31/2009 19:43 EST

Your latest news is more encouraging regarding the house and the farm, although you should not expect much in the way of cash income; more likely food in exchange for helping the family on the farm. A small business is a possibility but will require some investment and a close study of the potential competition from existing businesses. Remember, everyone thinks they can run a restaurant. Several fail each year in our area and a poor economy makes that a doubtful choice at this time. Every neighborhood usually has a traditional bakery, but a specialty bakery might be an idea, if he has the talent and experience. Once you get a visa, it should be fairly easy for you to get permission to work (absolutely necessary) from INM. The FM3 is a visa usually held by retirees, while an FM2 is the one which will allow you to progress to either 'inmigrado' or citizenship through naturalization. In your case, the latter can be done in as little as two years, as the spouse of a Mexican.
Surprisingly, language and cultural mores may be your biggest challenge in being accepted into the community. Allow it to change you and be very willing to adapt. Trying to change Mexico will doom you to failure. Listen well to the grandparents and to his parents. The position of the wife, especially a foreign wife, may not be what you expect. Be prepared for that.
Buena suerte y próspero año nuevo.

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aperez0713
1/4/2010 18:35 EST

Thank you that makes me feel a lot better. I am not familiar with what a C.U.R.P. is though and becuase of my husbands current situation it is really hard for him to get any kind of paper work done right now but I'm sure if it is something that is possible he will get to working on it.

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RVGRINGO
1/4/2010 20:42 EST

CURP is 'credencial unico de registro populacian', or something like that; a Mexican social security number.
You may also see reference to an RFC which is a Mexican tax number.

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