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Mexican Citizenship

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LeiaRowan
4/5/2018 06:50 EST

Everyone talks of permanent or temp. residency. But I have not seen any posts on becoming a Mexican citizen.
Wouldn't things be easier if you were Mexican and then renounce your other citizenship. Then only one place to pay taxes etc,.. all rights would be available.

Or is it so very difficult, like Thailand?

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
4/5/2018 11:52 EST

No, it is not that simple. First, you do not easily renounce your citizenship, especially from the USA, and suddenly escape taxation there.
For Mexico, you must apply for a residence visa at a Mexican consulate in your current country of residence. If you meet the financial requirements, you complete the visa process with Immigration authorities in Mexico. That takes some time; often a couple of months. A Temporary Residence visa is for 4 years, after which you transition to Residente Permanente. In another five years, with Spanish language and history under your belt, you may apply to the Mexican Foreign Affairs section of their State Department to be considered and tested for naturalization as a Mexican citizen. You would then have dual citizenship: When in Mexico a Mexican, and when in the USA a US citizen, for example, and would maintain both passports.

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LeiaRowan
4/5/2018 15:30 EST

I didn't realize Mexico made it that difficult. Canada is far easier.

The second thing I don't understsnd is why you would say its hard to renounce citizenship, especially american?

To renounce any citizenship, you must be a citizen somewhere else. Then filling out forms and filing them in the renounced country and I think the Hague?

In fact if an Irish citizen takes citizenship in the USA, they are automatically no longer a citizen of Ireland.

Ted Cruz renounced his Canadian citizenship simply, easily and we were all glad he did:-)..

Why would it be any harder to renounce US,.. ?

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Chucklesg
4/5/2018 19:55 EST

Most of us want to send Crummy Cruz back!

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
4/6/2018 12:37 EST

I think it is a very formal affair, to renounce USA citizenship, including personal interview, etc.
You will also be responsible for US taxes for many years, but I do not know the details. The US may let you renounce your citizenship, but may still consider you a “US Person“ for taxation anywhere in the world.
I suggest you get serious legal advice and study the US laws, if you are serious.
You will also need to consider how many years it will take you to possibly get citizenship elsewhere. It is not all that easy. Canada would not accept me, for example, as I am too old and too poor; even though I have Canadian roots going back to 1660, but was born in the USA. I also have Irish roots back to the 1750s, which are also worthless these days.

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train450
4/6/2018 13:28 EST

Ummm. Since he was elected then i guess MOST don't.

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kikipt
4/6/2018 13:34 EST

Train450 - That is not necessarily the case at all, since such a small percentage of Americans participate in the electoral process. Few people are elected by more than a minority of the population, so it is quite possible, even likely, that a majority of people in a state do not like their elected leaders. They are just too apathetic or self-absorbed to care one way or the other. Rather sad, actually!

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hrlee7804
4/8/2018 12:36 EST

I am guessing a social security check from US would go away at the same time...if that applies to you now or ever.

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
4/8/2018 13:31 EST

Anyone, of any nationality, who worked in the USA legally, had a SSN, and earned enough cridits to qualify, may receive their Social Security payments when they reach the appropriate age. The receipient may have the payments deposited to their home bank in most countries. You, or a Mexican citizen, if qualified, may have your SS deposited to a Mexican bank, for example.

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LeiaRowan
4/8/2018 18:43 EST

https://moodysgartner.com/events/us-tax-reform-is-here-is-now-the-time-to-give-up-your-us-citizenship/?utm_source=fbads&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=torontoRenunciationWebinarApril2018&utm_term=ExpatsVideo&utm_content=renunciationPoliticalStatement

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LeiaRowan
4/8/2018 18:50 EST

Following the link in the post before this one,.. apparently, as I suspected, once you renounce US citizenship. You no longer have to pay US taxes,.. what RVGringo said did not make sense, the US cannot collect tax from non citizens as long as their income is not US based.
Although I do think RV is a very knowledgeable;e person in most things,.. Americans seem to get misty or cloudy when it comes to the USA.

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
4/8/2018 19:04 EST

Here is what I said, but with some clarification added in parentheses:

You will also be responsible for US taxes (on US income) for many years, but I do not know the details. The US may let you renounce your citizenship, but may still consider you a “US Person“ for taxation anywhere (no matter that you live elsewhere) in the world.
I understand that they use that “US Person“ term, rather than “citizen“ in such matters.
I also stated that I did not know more details & advised formal legal consultation before acting.

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LeiaRowan
4/8/2018 21:42 EST

In Toronto and a few other places round the world, there are seminars on renouncing US citizenship. Yes, apparently it is complicated, but once done, the US has no claim on you for anything but US earned income.

and RV, yes Canada will accept you, you cannot collect CDN old age pension, but you can be a landed immigrant at any age. Canadians are nice people:-). And after 3 months you would qualify for Canada's universal healthcare which is a lot cheaper then anything offered in the US. Many Amer trained Drs. move to Canada because the healthcare system makes more sense.

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