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Don't Attempt to Live in Mexico with a Tourist Visa

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MonicaRixPaxson
5/10/2018 12:05 EST

I am concerned about an important piece of information that is being repeated on this platform that is no longer true (although it once was). If you are planning to live in Mexico you must now get a resident's visa. The system has been computerized and multiple tourist visas (180 days) are no longer universally tolerated. Yes, there may be differences in how the rules are enforced—for example, one port of entry vs. another or whether you fly into Mexico or drive in. But people are definitely being turned away at the border if it appears they are actually living in Mexico and attempting to reenter with a tourist's visa. Don't risk being separated from your home in Mexico. Get a resident's visa if you are planning to stay. Many people give bad advice based on historical information about this. They may have even done it themselves and not know about the change in policy, but getting multiple tourist visas not something that you can rely on today.

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Xicacafe
5/11/2018 08:23 EST

True

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kikipt
5/11/2018 09:21 EST

I totally agree. If we want to live here and take advantage of all that Mexico has to offer, the least we can do is to live here legally. It isn't that expensive or time consuming to get the proper residency. The only real concern is that there are, in fact, some people residing here who really do not have sufficient financial resources to qualify for even residencia temporal They really have little choice about how to remain in the country, and if inmigración becomes more and more strict about it, they could well face untenable options, and moving back to the US is not something they could afford.

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novato1953
5/11/2018 14:19 EST

Any link to what financial resources are nowadays required for a residencia temporal?

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longtimelurker
5/13/2018 08:14 EST

Nobody should be in Mexico without legal status. That said if one has an FMM tourista you are not illegal.

For many new comers coming to live in Mexico it is a "dream". They read on the internet about the retirement paradise of Lake Chapala, see themselves living on a Caribbean beach, or hear about how beautiful and safe Merida is. They might have visited for a week while on vacation and now they want to live here.


I strongly recommend delaying application for residency until you are sure about living in Mexico. Why go through the bureaucratic government hassles at the beginning of the "journey" when Mexico makes it so so easy to come for 6 months. There is a 99.9% chance you will be able to do a border run and get another 180 days.

I look at that post by Anndroid about "Living in the RM". She is already getting her paperwork together for her lawyer to apply for residency and she doesn't even know where she is going to live.


I know people that are living here on tourist visas. It is an uneasy, scary, time in their lives when they have to make that border run (around here it is at the Belize border).

Most expats posting recommend renting a home for a year before you purchase. Good sound advice.

Mexico has a way of chewing up newbie’s and spitting them out. My advice is to “know for sure” that Mexico is your home before getting involved with government.

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Bongiornor
5/13/2018 10:37 EST

I agree, and this should apply to any country you want to live in.. On the flip-side, if you really think Mexico is for you, you will need to start your Temporary Residency Visa application at home in whatever country your citizenship resides. I am from the US, so my first step was to apply at the Mexican Consulate for my Temporary Residency Visa. Google the process .. You can get the proper stamp needed on your passport in two weeks or less. That stamp will be needed to continue your application here in Mexico.

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longtimelurker
5/13/2018 10:48 EST

That stamp is a visa complete with your photo.

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novato1953
5/13/2018 11:47 EST

Thanks for the tips. In my youth I spent a few years in Mexico, learned serviceable Spanish and thoroughly enjoyed the country. Then I spent 30 years making money. In the last five years I've spent time in Nicaragua, Colombia, Ecuador and Argentina before finally returning to Oaxaca around Christmas for ~85 days -- and was surprised how little the place had changed. I appreciate it even more now, when I have places to compare to it. But I suspected what worked in the 1970s and 1980s (throwing away your tourist visa before it expired and applying for a fresh replacement with a new 90-day term) was unlikely to still be a good hack.

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mmapags
5/13/2018 12:26 EST

I respectfully disagree with the post to wait on applying for a resident visa if you think you may want to live in Mexico.

It is fairly inexpensive. Depending on the Consulate, not that difficult and has the benefit of not having to go back to your home country, find a temporary place to live and then apply if you decide to stay after an extended visit.

To visit in a tourist visa, then go back and apply seems like far more hassle than just getting a Residente Temporal.

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Shellyclark2002
5/13/2018 12:44 EST

Thank you to all who have given us readers current information regarding the 180 day tourist visa. I too thought it was an easy thing to go to the border and renew. Perhaps staying abroad in in country for 180 days will be helpful in making a good and informed decision. Of course the EU only gives us 90 days unlike Mexico at 180 days.

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
5/13/2018 16:20 EST

The reall question is, whether or not you are willing to make a border run every 180 days, or would rather make one trip south with an approved residence visa. Of course, you can always return north, once the visa process is completed, and visit or stay. With a Residente Temporal visa, you can still use your US car, and only have to be sure to be at your home in Mexico at visa renewal times, until you transition to Residente Permanente. Then, there are no limits, and no renewals. You can even work, but can no longer have a US car.

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MonicaRixPaxson
5/13/2018 16:45 EST

Respectfully RV, I don't think you are asking the right question. The whole point I was making warning people about attempting to live in Mexico with a tourist visa wasn't if you are willing to make a border run every 180 days. That seems to suggest that you can do that successfully if you are simply willing to make the trip. The REAL question is: Are you willing to be turned away when you attempt to re-enter Mexico with a tourist visa? It very nearly happened to me the last time I made a border run. I was questioned and told I could not return since it appeared I was living in Mexico. Trust me, that was not a good experience since my family, dogs and everything I owned awaited my return to Mexico. Fortunately. I already had my visa in hand and I believe that the complexities of reversing the visa were the only thing that prevented me being turned away at the airport. When I got home, I discover that there were other people who actually had been turned away at the border the same day. Yes, I am sure that some people get away with it. But as the politics of the border get more heated, I think that you have to warn people not to take risks, especially since the consequences can be so costly. (I am a permanent resident now.)

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
5/13/2018 17:39 EST

Your point is well taken, Monica, and I probably assumed that the readeers would also consider the possibility of being refused at the border. That could be a serious setback, and would require that they go to the nearest Mexican consulate to apply for a residence visa. The “Catch-22“ would be that all the necessary documents would probably be in their Mexican home.....out of reach.
Yes, I guess it is probably time to forget about border runs, and do it the correct way; 180 day tourist permit or get a residence visa for anything longer. Not surprisingly, that is exactly what Mexico intends, and will probably soon enforce even more strictly. It would be more than inconvenient to be prohibited from entering, for maybe 6-12 months, and not being able to get to your pets, your house, and other stuff; if you were unable to qualify for a residence visa & had to wait, and wait, and wait.......

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longtimelurker
5/14/2018 07:44 EST

I have a couple of questions, Monica. How many years were you living in Mexico on a FMM tourista? What airport was turning people away? Why would INM "almost" turn you away when you had a visa in your passport issued by the consulate?

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MsAlex
5/14/2018 09:30 EST

I heartily agree that "things can change" in terms of long term plans. The worst approach is to buy a house somewhere in Mexico before you're actually "playing with a full deck" of knowledge and experience. Jumping quickly for permanent residency status may work for some, but for many it may just be unnecessary for the phase of discovery they are in. If you are driving down for example, be aware that Permanent Residents are not allowed to drive a foreign plated car in Mexico (e.g. a car with US or Canadian plates), though you can on a tourist visa.

Making the move to Mexico is both an emotional and practical PROCESS. There are phases that you can move through in sequence, both in terms of your own mind, discovering where you'll be happiest, and categories of visas. If possible given your own circumstances, seeing your move to Mexico as a process (like evolution) works better than sudden rapid permanent change.


Alex
Owner/Administrator
HouseSitMexico.com

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MsAlex
5/14/2018 09:30 EST

I heartily agree that "things can change" in terms of long term plans. The worst approach is to buy a house somewhere in Mexico before you're actually "playing with a full deck" of knowledge and experience. Jumping quickly for permanent residency status may work for some, but for many it may just be unnecessary for the phase of discovery they are in. If you are driving down for example, be aware that Permanent Residents are not allowed to drive a foreign plated car in Mexico (e.g. a car with US or Canadian plates), though you can on a tourist visa.

Making the move to Mexico is both an emotional and practical PROCESS. There are phases that you can move through in sequence, both in terms of your own mind, discovering where you'll be happiest, and categories of visas. If possible given your own circumstances, seeing your move to Mexico as a process (like evolution) works better than sudden rapid permanent change.


Alex
Owner/Administrator
HouseSitMexico.com

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kikipt
5/14/2018 10:22 EST

Your comment is misleading. Expats with residencia temporal, not just those with a tourist visa, can also drive their cars into Mexico with the proper documentation. We made the "rapid permanent change" you decry, having done extensive research in advance, which is not that difficult these days, and have not the slightest regret. Every situation is different, and it is disconcerting to see the degree to which people are willing to make absolute statements about other people's lives and decisions. Unfortunately, we listened to much of the "advice" offered by many of these and discovered that they are rarely correct.

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Cozumeldeb
5/14/2018 11:02 EST

Totally agree MS Alex, all great advice. We bought in 2002, but had been going to MX since 1989. IMO, Mexico is retirement heaven. I've noticed an up tick of Americans unhappy with US political situation and are looking to escape that, in QRoo, Yucatan + Guanjuanto.
Take your time, do your homework, travel to different areas, pay attention to State Dept warnings, sign up for alerts. Avoid problem areas. Good luck and enjoy MX.

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MonicaRixPaxson
5/15/2018 01:20 EST

I was back and forth as a tourist many times over five years visiting the guy who is now my husband. Then I moved to Mexico like a glacier (a slow-motion relationship), mostly in Mexico for another five where I accumulated a household, still with FMM, but there was a point about 3 or 4 years ago when it was clear that the system had been computerized and the old way of doing things was likely to change. I got my last FMM on foot at the Puente in Loredo but was nearly refused entry at the airport in Nuevo Loredo, Mexico. An official told me that it appeared that I was living in Mexico (obvious from the computerized record) and I could not continue with a tourist visa. I am certain that he would not have issued a visa, but since I had already had one in hand that I'd gotten at the Puente, refusing me would have been complicated. I told him that I was engaged to a Mexican and would apply for a resident’s visa after our upcoming marriage. And that's exactly what happened. I knew that it had been a close call, that I'd dodged a bullet, but that was confirmed when I got home that night and read a post in an online group telling me that others had been turned back at the airport when trying to reenter Mexico on tourist visas that same day. I'm not certain who made the post, but it may have been Sonia soniadiaz.mx, who does all kinds of work with expats including advising those who get stranded.

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longtimelurker
5/16/2018 08:36 EST

Wow, you were one of the people caught up? I remember reading about that time in N Laredo. INM sent a chill down the spine of a lot of permanent tourists.

Didn't that occur around the beginning of Trumps presidency?

I personally know of 2 other prepetual tourists that were warned at Cancun airport that "it appears you live in Mexico and this is your last tourist visa". One was this year and the other 8 years ago. Both are residente's now.
OTOH, Last Saturday an acquaintance of mine going for his 3rd consecutive FMM went to Cancun airport, walked into INM and received a new 180 FMM for 550 pesos. Don't we all love Mexico?

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MonicaRixPaxson
5/16/2018 12:18 EST

It was in neither of the timeframes you mention. We will simply never know if or when people are turned away. But I ask: What is the likelihood that an official who just had relatives deported from the US is going to be overjoyed stamping your passport with a tourist visa for the 3rd time? Mexicans are people of good will. They tolerate a great deal with grace and even love. But the well is not bottomless and it is not a good idea for anyone to break the rules.

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JaimeC
6/2/2018 23:11 EST

You do not have to do it in the country of your citizenship. I am doing it here in Costa Rica. They want to see 1300/mo deposits into your account. In my case a US bank.

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
6/3/2018 12:28 EST

Making application for a residence visa for Mexico, may be done in a Mexican Consulate in your country of legal residence; you need not be a citizen of that country. You simply need to be there legally, and maybe with a residence visa, but that is vague, I think.

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JaimeC
6/4/2018 15:50 EST

I got my approval for a temporal visa today after 2 visits at the mx consulate here in Costa Rica. I am in CR on a tourist visa. Que Bueno!

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longtimelurker
6/5/2018 08:19 EST

Congratulations on getting approval Jamie. Where do you plan to locate to.

Contrary to some experts advice you do not have to apply for residency at the consulate in your home country. You can apply at any Mexician embassy or consulate outside of Mexico.
Here is a short, well written article about the residency process.

http://qroo.us/2018/06/01/an-expert-explains-why-it-takes-some-people-longer-to-get-their-mexican-resident-card/

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JaboneraNatural
6/15/2018 13:05 EST

No links, but get an appointment at the consultar in Laredo. Cost is $36 for the visa (in Mexican funds)... You need income of apx $1200/mo and/or work visa for less.
Really no huge drama...

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longtimelurker
6/15/2018 19:48 EST

Unless you only get $1100 a month. You can't live anywhere in the States on that , except to live on the street. You don't qualify for a resident visa but you can live in Mexico on that.

How??? On a FMM touristas.

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grapenut
6/16/2018 22:29 EST

I DONT HAVE ANY TYPE OF VISA and i dont plan to either. been here since aug 2017 and dont plan to leave. getting married this month to a beautiful mexican senorita and will remain here as an expat illegal. moved here cause couldnt afford to live in us on $1300 so here i will remain. the whole idea was to disappear here i and i have done just that. and so can u. there r millions of expats doing the same thing. and nobody cares. u start making waves ull do nothing but cause trouble for yourself. so give up the ideas of visas and fmm card s and enjoy the country.

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grapenut
6/16/2018 22:29 EST

I DONT HAVE ANY TYPE OF VISA and i dont plan to either. been here since aug 2017 and dont plan to leave. getting married this month to a beautiful mexican senorita and will remain here as an expat illegal. moved here cause couldnt afford to live in us on $1300 so here i will remain. the whole idea was to disappear here i and i have done just that. and so can u. there r millions of expats doing the same thing. and nobody cares. u start making waves ull do nothing but cause trouble for yourself. so give up the ideas of visas and fmm card s and enjoy the country.

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grapenut
6/16/2018 22:29 EST

I DONT HAVE ANY TYPE OF VISA and i dont plan to either. been here since aug 2017 and dont plan to leave. getting married this month to a beautiful mexican senorita and will remain here as an expat illegal. moved here cause couldnt afford to live in us on $1300 so here i will remain. the whole idea was to disappear here i and i have done just that. and so can u. there r millions of expats doing the same thing. and nobody cares. u start making waves ull do nothing but cause trouble for yourself. so give up the ideas of visas and fmm card s and enjoy the country.

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vantexan
6/18/2018 10:32 EST

I spent 3 months in Mexico last year and no one asked to see my passport, etc so I guess you could get away with that. But what if the day comes and you need to return to the States for whatever reason? You may not intend to but many people have family ties, property, Social Security matters, Medicare matters, etc that they need to attend to.

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
6/18/2018 12:08 EST

Living in Mexico with just a tourist permit, or illegally, will have several drawbacks: You will find it very difficult to have a car, or do anything else that requires ID and involves local, state or federal agencies. Even landlords may want to see ID and proof of legal presence in the country.
Then, if you manage to avoid those problems, you will eventually cross a border, perhaps for medical care or family reasons. That, or getting into any kind of trouble, may cause you to leave Mexico. Getting back in is not guaranteed, so you won't want to leave anything valuable behind.
Working will be prohibited and if caught, you may find yourself deported with sudden removal. No going home to pack..........
Best to stay legal. Mexico now has good computer systems and can track you. They also share information with the USA.

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longtimelurker
6/18/2018 20:17 EST

RV, If you have a valid FMM, you are LEGALLY in Mexico. Is that hard to understand? The rest of your post is a scare mongering or just plain BS

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longtimelurker
6/19/2018 07:59 EST

Vantex, There is nothing keeping you from going to the USA (if you are a citizen). As far as returning to Mexico, you can just walk across the border with or without an FMM.
Now if you are travelling around Mexico there are INM checkpoints so it would be wiser to have an FMM and passport.
What happened to the OP, after doing the FMM shuffle for 5 years, is extremely extremely rare.

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harddazeknight
6/19/2018 10:07 EST

lurker
Apparently what you failed to understand was that RV was replying to a post from grapenut, 6/16/2018, wherein he(?) basically advised any who cared to heed to forget taking the time and effort to reside in Mexico legally. In my rarely humble opinion, RV understands more than most, and obviously more than you, about the trials, tribulations and wonders of being an expat in Mexico. He is a dependable voice and valued resource in this forum.... you -- meh.

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hrlee7804
6/19/2018 10:31 EST

I have scolded Lurker before for being a d#ck to RV in a PM. Lurker feels the need to be the authority on this site. Most here know Lurker is more mouth than knowledge.

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kikipt
6/19/2018 13:47 EST

Sorry lurker, but you are wrong. If you are in Mexico on an FMM, you are in Mexico legally only as long as you are a TOURIST. Once you decide to reside here, you are not here legally if you are here on a TOURIST visa. Is THAT so hard to understand. Mexico has the right to make its own laws, and it is pretty clear what the purpose of each visa is.

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larryoinpdx
6/19/2018 15:30 EST

Kikipt is absolutely right as usual! When you come through Mexican immigration using your passport, they just give you the FMM card and tell you to hold onto it. When you come through with a 6 month visa from a Mexican Consulate anywhere in the US, they tell you to show up at immigration within 30 days to continue to process the application - the tramite! That thirty days, however, is . . . flexible, as are most deadlines in Mexico. If it falls in December, for example, no one expects you to show up until January, because virtually the whole government closes down in December.

Viva Mexico!

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jackoh1
6/19/2018 19:21 EST

Agree Resident Visa best ...but 180 day tourist visa works too ...but dont go over the 180 days

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vantexan
6/20/2018 17:36 EST

Longtimelurker, Do you not have to go through customs and turn in your FMM before leaving Mexico?

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longtimelurker
6/21/2018 10:28 EST

I have lived in Mexico for well over a decade and have done a lot and seen a lot,

Sorry HRlee, I don't freely give advice but I will continue to post correcting bad advise. There is so much of it on forums. Kikipt posted above in this thread"Unfortunately, we listened to much of the "advice" offered by many of these and discovered that they are rarely correct." A certain poster never learns and continue posting cr-p. Let's see if that poster stops saying " apply at a consulate in you HOME country" now that Jamiec, a tourist in Costa Rica, posts how easy it was to get his "Mexico Visa"( (Canje?) affixed to his passport. There are many others just like Jamie. Lately that same poster has added scare mongering to his posts,

Kikpt, I know what the FFM/old FMT law intends. I also see how it is applied. Bottom line, the law is that INM officer you are standing in front of at a port of entry. In those few minutes your fate is not in your hands. How you act and appear is important. For Americans and Canadians 99.95% of the time you are given 180 day FMM, no questions asked. It makes it easy to be in the country. If you ever get asked for your papers, you have the legal document. That is the reality of it.

There are thousands of people just like grapenut living in border cities without papers. No personal judgements coming from me on this practice.

Vantex, when leaving Mexico you do not see Aduana ( Mexico's customs). I have an RP today. I am required to check-out. I did the tourist shuffle for many years too. A FMM tourist will turn their form to the airline when flying or INM when driving. Most driving don't and there doesn't seem to be any consequences.

I got my passport in 2011. I just counted my INM stamps and I have 48 plus 1 Mexico Visa. Most were land stamps, with the car picture. I do interact with INM more than most.

I have seen the changes in Mexico computer system. The country tracks most everything. A lot is online. Here is a good government site with all kinds of links to actual deportation statistics.

http://www.politicamigratoria.gob.mx/es_mx/SEGOB/Extranjeros_presentados_y_devueltos

http://postdeportation.org/statistics/

Mexico is not rounding up the illegal Americans and sending them home.

You Canadians know how to stay invisible worldwide :-)

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Retiree2
6/21/2018 17:37 EST

"larryoinpdx

6/19/2018 15:30 EST

Kikipt is absolutely right as usual! When you come through Mexican immigration using your passport, they just give you the FMM card and tell you to hold onto it. When you come through with a 6 month visa from a Mexican Consulate anywhere in the US, they tell you to show up at immigration within 30 days to continue to process the application - the tramite! That thirty days, however, is . . . flexible, as are most deadlines in Mexico. If it falls in December, for example, no one expects you to show up until January, because virtually the whole government closes down in December."

Actually this is bad advise. The 30 day "canje" FMM card HAS TO be presented to your local INM [Mexican Immigration] office before it expires [30 days maximunm] or you are in the country illegally and will be told to leave Mexico and start the immigration process at a Mexican Consulate all over again.

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Retiree2
6/21/2018 17:50 EST

"Kikpt, I know what the FFM/old FMT law intends. I also see how it is applied. Bottom line, the law is that INM officer you are standing in front of at a port of entry. In those few minutes your fate is not in your hands. How you act and appear is important. For Americans and Canadians 99.95% of the time you are given 180 day FMM, no questions asked. It makes it easy to be in the country. If you ever get asked for your papers, you have the legal document. That is the reality of it."

This is the INM´s current law and rules. All other comments here are mostly speculation. The INM official giving foreigners by law has the discretion to give 180 days, 30 days etc. of refuse the foreigner entry into Mexico. They are simply following orders and are legally admitting foreigners who just turned a 180 day tourist FMM card another 180 day tourist FMM card if they want to.

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larryoinpdx
6/21/2018 18:07 EST

Sorry, retiree - it happened to my partner. In fact, we went to immigration before the 30 day period expired but in December and there was an employee posted in the lobby specifically to tell everyone to come back in January.

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Retiree2
6/21/2018 19:18 EST

"larryoinpdx

6/19/2018 15:30 EST

Kikipt is absolutely right as usual! When you come through Mexican immigration using your passport, they just give you the FMM card and tell you to hold onto it. When you come through with a 6 month visa from a Mexican Consulate anywhere in the US, they tell you to show up at immigration within 30 days to continue to process the application - the tramite! That thirty days, however, is . . . flexible, as are most deadlines in Mexico. If it falls in December, for example, no one expects you to show up until January, because virtually the whole government closes down in December."


"larryoinpdx

6/21/2018 6:07 PM

Sorry, retiree - it happened to my partner. In fact, we went to immigration before the 30 day period expired but in December and there was an employee posted in the lobby specifically to tell everyone to come back in January."

No need to be sorry Larry. Your original post is telling people " . . . flexible, as are most deadlines in Mexico." which is not true in government rules and laws and actual practise - they stick to deadlines when your are processing something according to a law or rule.

.You also wrongly stated: "..., because virtually the whole government closes down in December." but only INM and one other federal Mexican government department and a couple of states close their offices for Winter vacation. The vast majority of the Mexican Government only closes on Christmas day and New Years day.

If they could not accept your 30 day "canje" FMM for processing because they close from Dec. 18th. to Jan. 7th. every year then you would have to come back when they are able to start processing your application obviously. But stating anytime anyone wants to come in the rest of the year at their leasure after 30 days would invalidate their preappoved RT of RP 6 month visa in thei passport from a Mexican Consulate. Let´s be more articulate n giving info. others may be interested in knowing. OK?

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longtimelurker
6/21/2018 20:12 EST

Retiree2 "This is the INM´s current law and rules. All other comments here are mostly speculation. The INM official giving foreigners by law has the discretion to give 180 days, 30 days etc. of refuse the foreigner entry into Mexico. They are simply following orders and are legally admitting foreigners who just turned a 180 day tourist FMM card another 180 day tourist FMM card if they want to. "

There was a time in the early 2000's that Cancun airport INM officers only issued 14 days on the FMT's. For most tourist that was all the time they needed. INM did this for 2 months. People on the "tourist shuffle" really were shuffling then.

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Cozumeldeb
6/21/2018 20:49 EST

I've not see anything flexible with our INM office. We used a local attorney and had all docs that were required to be translated, bank statements etc done when we got there. Were told in Chicago to get our docs to the office asap possible after we arrived, prior to holiday break. Which we did. Everything was done when the office opened after Christmas break. That was 12/2015. They kept to their schedule. We felt it was worth the $$ to have a lawyer.

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bluewater1
6/23/2018 10:18 EST

Do not assume the deadlines are flexible or you will have to start the process over. Definitely not good advice.

It took 8 months to get our perm resident visas, it would have been 6 months but we had to leave Mexico during the process on a 60-day pass. Neighbors who used the same lawyer 1 month before we did got her card within 3 weeks. A backlog started just as we applied, plus our agent was out on leave and his files locked. Another neighbor who used a lawyer who has contacts started the process last week and will be fingerprinted this week!

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bluewater1
6/23/2018 10:59 EST

Clarification/correction on our app process in Mexico - it would have been a 2.5 month timeframe if we hadn’t left the country.

Other neighbors own a home and have been living here for 6 years on the 180-day FMM (not a visa). Strange but true...they are missing out on all of the benefits the visa provides...

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hockeyrick
6/23/2018 14:58 EST

Any idea what are the basic requirements for a resident visa?

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Cozumeldeb
6/23/2018 15:38 EST

Being retired makes it a little easier. We gave them our monthly pension letters, 6 most of bank statements proving the pension deposit. Medicare info. We own a home in MX. The main item is prove your monthly income so you are not a burden on MX. IMO, Mexico is retirement heaven! Good Luck.

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hockeyrick
6/23/2018 15:40 EST

ok, what are the monetary numbers? I get SS, small but some, have some investment stuff, what does one have to show or prove?

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RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
6/23/2018 16:12 EST

Ballpark: Figure $1000-$1500 USD per month income, and/or $100,000.00 invested, depending on your age, retirement status and which type of visa you wish to obtain.
For current, accurate figures, visit a Mexican Consulate website, and/or make an appointment.

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larryoinpdx
6/23/2018 17:33 EST

Basic monthly income requirement is $1500.00 USD.

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bluewater1
6/23/2018 19:17 EST

As mentioned go by the Mex consulate website that you will be starting the process at for accurate information on what you need as there is a ton of incorrect or outdated info on these public forums.
We went to the NYC consulate and had to go twice, once to apply and again to pick up our passports with the temporary “visa”, spent the night both visitsso it was pricey. You then have 6 mos to enter Mexico, and must start the canje process there within 30 days of entry. But refer to the consulate for requirements.

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MonicaRixPaxson
6/30/2018 12:51 EST

While this article doesn't specifically address the question of living in Mexico on tourist visas, it does make it clear that the INM does conduct random checks for visas and why you want to have one. https://themazatlanpost.com/2018/06/28/if-youre-an-ex-pat-living-in-mexico-be-prepared-for-random-immigration-checks/

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Retiree2
6/30/2018 15:06 EST

The article is giving advise against the INM rule of presenting your original INM document - RT or RP visa/card when asked, not photo copies or photos on Smart phones are accepted. INM officials and Federal Pólice can detain anyone without an original laser embedded INM logo on their INM card tp inspect at their whim. That is very clear in the INM rules and is even in your packet of printouts your recieved when being processed at your local INM office. Y
Wen you sign the final form to recieve your RT ot RP card your are signig that your will present it to any INM oficial who wants to inspect it and carry it on your person at all times while in Mexico. amongst other obligations recieving it brings according to the rules and law.

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bluewater1
7/1/2018 12:05 EST

>> is even in your packet of printouts your recieved when being processed at your local INM office. <<

We signed in acknowledgment of our cards, but did not receive any printouts or any kind of packet. Is there anything else in this packet we should have?

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EcuadorDean

From: Ecuador
7/30/2018 10:53 EST

I have both a Canadian and USA passport, so I am going to try to be 180 USA and 180 Canadian! With a period of time inbetween in Guatemala. My pension is only $1000 a month. How many Mexicans make $1500 a month, wow.....

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newton1122
7/30/2018 11:25 EST

How do you do that on $1000/month

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EcuadorDean

From: Ecuador
7/31/2018 09:59 EST

The same way most Mexicans do it, and they do it with less!

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lindaceleste
7/31/2018 10:51 EST

If they could find this guy without any visa, they can find any body.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/florida/fl-reg-sex-battery-fugitive-old-warrant-20180730-story.html

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Dharmagranny
7/31/2018 17:50 EST

Thanks, Retiree2, for clarifying for everyone that you must present the original laminated plastic tarjeta for your resident permanente or temporal. People on all kinds of web and facebook forums advise that you can present a copy or a phone image....not so. A case today in Sayulita was of a federale pressing a woman for her visas, and she didn't have anything with her (passport, tourist visa entry card, or a tarjeta). It got dicey and though I didn't hear how it finally ended, I imagine it may have gotten pricey as well. Carry your documents with you. Keep copies in a safe place. This includes your original fingerprinted copy of your health insurance with IMSS or Seguro Popular, and your CURP certificate (though I think you can get away with just a copy of that one). We don't make the rules, Mexican immigration makes the rules. It is up to us to comply with the rules if we expect to enjoy the privilege of living on less and getting more here in this great country. Gaming the system with perpetual tourist visas has now made you a high visibility deportation target. Get legal while you still can.

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YellowTail
7/31/2018 18:13 EST

fwiw - your 'old' CURP document is no longer valid. You need to print off a letter sized sheet of paper from the official web-site. Doubt you are going to be carrying that around everyday in your wallet.

We had copies of our INM credentials NOTARIZED - and that is what we keep in the glove compartment with our insurance papers etc.

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Dharmagranny
7/31/2018 18:35 EST

It would be nice to have everything nicely wallet sized and laminated, but that isn't going to happen in Mexico for some time to come, I am pretty sure. Meanwhile, I carry the letter sized CURP doc, and it's a good thing that paper folds, because that way all of those things like the CURP and my health service enrollment certificate can fit right in alongside my passport and RP card in a special pouch I carry around.

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Dharmagranny
7/31/2018 18:36 EST

PS: I also keep notarized copies of everything at home in my safe.

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bigfootbill
7/31/2018 19:14 EST

What’s the web site?

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Cozumeldeb
7/31/2018 19:24 EST

Really interesting, how state rules vary. Same for MX Consulates in US states for rules vary for RP. When we got our RP, our local office told us to never carry orginal cards or docs. Copies only, said you have 24-48 hrs if you are stopped for whatever reason to produce your docs. This is in QRoo, so may be a state thing.

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Cozumeldeb
7/31/2018 19:28 EST

Yes Monica, I agree. We live in Cozumel and for years people raced to Belize to get another stamp. Then Belize got smart requiring people to stay over night, so can make some $$. This year many still depending on tourist visa are getting stamped for 7 days only.. Get legal, no worries then.

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bigfootbill
8/1/2018 12:07 EST

fwiw - your 'old' CURP document is no longer valid. You need to print off where i thia letter sized sheet of paper from the official web-site

Where is this web site ?

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bigfootbill
8/1/2018 12:07 EST

fwiw - your 'old' CURP document is no longer valid. You need to print off where i thia letter sized sheet of paper from the official web-site

Where is this web site ?

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YellowTail
8/1/2018 12:22 EST

Here you go :

https://consultas.curp.gob.mx/CurpSP/inicio2_2.jsp

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