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Recommended cities to relocate to in Mexico

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immortaljedi
12/18/2018 14:13 EST

Hello, I am trying with the idea of moving to Mexico. But I'm not sure on which city to move to. If anyone could please post anything realted to income requirements, cost of living, recomended savings, water/power issues, food issues, high crime areas, required legal documents ect. Anything that you wish you knew before planning your trip.

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longtimelurker
12/18/2018 17:02 EST

It depends on what you are looking for. Are you retired? Working? Active? A beach person or mountain person?

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YellowTail
12/18/2018 18:18 EST

Why are you considering Mexico ?

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immortaljedi
12/18/2018 19:22 EST

I get a disability check each month. But I am not affraid of work. I am certain that I won't find work right away. And that's ok with me. Oceans or mountains don't matter to me one way or the other. I want a safe environment that's affordable.

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immortaljedi
12/18/2018 19:23 EST

Mostly the economy.

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Cozumeldeb
12/19/2018 08:54 EST

I would recommend you Google Mexican residency, it will give u income requirements and more.
Research a few areas, beach areas are very nice, we live in cozumel. However ALL beach cities are very humid/hot in summer mos..
There central part of MX has a near perfect climate yr around. Guadalajara, a lot of expat communities around it, Guanajuato is a especially beautiful area, in the mountains, high altitude if u have breathing issues..IMO these are safe areas, but being aware is important no matter where..Do some homework, cost of living is less than half than US.

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longtimelurker
12/19/2018 14:47 EST

Check out Guaymas,Sonora. It is close to the border, if you don't want to mess with the residency crap right off. No Hassle Zone too.

Nice beaches, great seafood and really cheap rentals.

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RVGRINGO
12/19/2018 15:48 EST

Yes, there are financial requirements to prove your income is sufficient to live in Mexico. If it is, you may be approved for a residence visa by the nearest Mexican consulate. Inquire there for details. Most have websites, or will make an appointment for you.
If you disability involves your mobility, you will find that Mexico is generally not a comfortable place for those with such conditions. There is nothing like the ADA; not even close.
Otherwise, Mexico is a wonderful place to live and the people are very welcoming to those who accept them and their country, culture, and even its warts.
If you speak Spanish, your life will be much more enjoyable, and much less expensive.

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novato1953
12/19/2018 18:31 EST

Sounds to me like your budget is your prime concern. If that's true, then invest a little time and money traveling around Mexico. Try places on for size, and you'll not only likely save a bundle in the long run, you'll be happier doing it. Remember islands are most expensive, beaches next, and many things in southern Mexico are often considerably less expensive than in northern Mexico.

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immortaljedi
12/19/2018 19:11 EST

Thanks.

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roblow65
1/12/2019 19:30 EST

I'm planning on moving to a border town within the next 6 months, and will continue to work in the US. If I'm in a border town, do I still need to get a temporary/permanent visa, even just to bring over my household goods without paying?

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Rodrigo1974
1/17/2019 09:42 EST

i live in mexico city for employment and familial reasons. i hate it with a passion. the quality of air is horrific. i love taxco, the silver mining city, and pachuca, which has weather like a crisp autumn day in the northeastern united states! if you want a semi-tropical twist with folk who don't have that taciturn reserve, try cuatla. don't fool around in baja california sur. it's too expensive, but i love the desert-like atmosphere. if you want a beach area that won't run you a bundle and used to be remote, puerto escondido or puerto angel. stay away from puerto vallarta. it's got raw sewage running directly into the ocean and it's filled with hotels and huge hills. huatulco is a beach town that they tried to make into another lesser cancun, but it never took off for some reason. the ocean is like being in a whirlpool!!!

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nelsonokelmgmailcom
1/17/2019 10:08 EST

Puerto Vallarta does NOT have raw sewage running into the ocean, We have state of the art treatment facilities and water that is safe to drink right out of the tap. Sayulita has the raw sewage problem. The "hills" are actually mountains on the east side of the city. We like our hills. It is a large city with many amenities. You need to do your homework!!

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Lahry
1/17/2019 14:42 EST

I'm a single guy, 75 yo, good health and mobility. I moved to Chapala, Jalisco last August. I have a 1 br furnished flat, all inclusive. I pay $200/mo for it. All the walking is flat in the Centro area. I walk alot. If I go to Ajijic and the like, I take the bus. About $.40 each way.
I can easily live here for $700 mo.
I have a temporal residente visa. Total cost is just over $200 US. But there are lots of folks here on 'tourist visa'. (180 days). So every 180 days you must leave the country and then return if you like.
The temporal residente requirement is $1300 and change. Proven income for the previous 6 months (bank statement with your name and the banks name). That is all done before you come to Mexico. Then when you arrive you have 30 days to check in with Mexican Immigration. They give you a list of instructions, that includes going to a local bank and paying the in country fee, which is about $168 USds.
Lots of english speakers here also. This is snow bird season, so I'd wait until April to come. Places are redily available and the price drops.

Bon Voyage.

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