Expat Exchange
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
Playa del Carmen, Mexico

35 Expats Talk about Health Insurance and Healthcare in Mexico

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Last updated on Sep 21, 2022

Summary: Expats and global nomads in Mexico share their experiences with health insurance, healthcare in Mexico, local hospitals and specialists, quality of medical care and more.

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How are healthcare services Mexico?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

When we asked expats and global nomads about the quality of medical care in Mexico, they replied:

"Unfortunately, we do not have great options for people with serious issues - like cancer. But diabetes and high blood pressure, although serious, can be cared for here. Our issue in Huatulco is we do not have a private hospital, so we rely mostly on the Red Cross and the Marine Hospital.," remarked another expat in Huatulco.

"Although I have met people having care for serious conditions, my experience has only been dental. People I know who had the same procedure done just across the border in San Diego had side effects I did not experience with my Mexican dentist," remarked another expat living in Tijuana.

"Medical care is readily available in our area and we have a very nice private hospital called Hospitan. Another private hospital - not as well equipped - CostaMed. The doctors all speak English and as we have Global Health insurance, we have the option to choose any hospital or doctor we wish. Private hospitals are really the only way to go if you expect the type of facilities and services that you would receive in the United States. As Playa Del Carmen is a smaller community, many times you will need to go to Cancun for specific needs. They have several private hospitals - Galenia, a larger Hospitan. If you have a chronic medical condition you might want to check with either hospital to make sure that the resources you will need are available," said one expat living in Playa Del Carmen.

"Be sure to have travel insurance... helps to speak Spanish to communicate more freely with the caregivers, however someone there will speak English," mentioned another expat in Puerto Vallarta.

" It depends on finances and age. If you're a professional moving to Mexico for business reasons, then you'll no doubt be given a private insurance plan. For those still young, private insurance is cheaper than in the USA but still ultimately unaffordable. Those working for public or private sector employers should automatically be enlisted in the IMSS which is our national system free to the user. Roughy equivalent to the UK's NHS, if you need something major it is excellent. For minor problems you may care to go private. Besides the IMSS, if you're not working you can enroll in the govenment's Seguro Popular system which is probably a bit inferior to the IMSS but again will protect you against major events. Next, I recommend paying monthly to subscribe to a private ambulance/outpatient service such as EMME. The price is reasonable and they come quickly with a fully equipped ambulance and medical team. They also have an outpatient walk-in centre open until late. Most pharmacies have an attached doctor available during work hours (sometimes morning only) and you can get a quick consultation either free or at insignificant cost - very useful if you need an antibiotic because these need a prescription now. ," commented one expat who moved to Monterrey, Mexico.

"Make sure to join the national system and also subscribe to a local emergency ambulance service," remarked one expat living in Monterrey.

"I avoid cut-and-drug as much as possible and take responsibility for the key aspects of health: eating wisely and exercising. If I don't do those things, what can anyone do for me? What I do no t like about the government health program that I joined is that doctors have the same reliance on drugs as in the US. I have not had hospital care, but friends who have report excellent care. I would like to start a movement to ban Coca Cola and other diabetes-inducing "foods." And I would like to see more attention paid to use of traditional medicinal plants, which are widely available in Mexico," said another expat.

"Healthcare is better, quickly available, affordable. For instance, I suffered a severe bacterial infection that required 3 major surgeries and 35 days in hospital. $11,130. !! Doctors treated me 7 days a week, sometimes twice a day, and the care was outstanding. Comparable care in the US would have cost over $400,000.00 and would not have been as good," remarked another expat in Xcalak.

"Public healthcare here works well here as long as one is patient! There are plenty of inexpensive clinics and laboratories. MRI price start at 150dlls," remarked another expat living in Acapulco.

"I had an ear infection and was able to see a nurse at a clinic and to get a prescription immediately, both for very little cost," said one expat living in La Mision.

"Haven't needed to test it out seriously, but have made inquires and am confident. Needed an antibiotic for a tooth infection. Got it VERY affordably and easily on the sopt. A tooth extraction was $20.00 USD," mentioned another expat in Huatulco.

"Being a small town with a lot of clinics and one small private hospital, we have most everything we need. Being 30 minutes from Cancun and Playa del Carmen enables us to find whatever we need," commented one expat who moved to Tulum, Mexico.

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William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

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William Russell Health Insurance

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

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Are healthcare and health insurance expensive in Mexico?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

"I do not have medical insurance here in Mexico. And, most of my Dr's do not accept insurance anyway. Office visits, and hospital care are 1/5th the cost of USA and much better. In office appointments are usually an hour long instead of the 15 minute flyby of USA. Few Specialist have nurses. They do their own scheduling," added another expat.

"Medicare and supplements are only of use within the US except for certain life threatening emergencies when traveling. If you have substantial financial resources and a high respect for the health services in major cities you can pay for private care. Most insurance in MX will not cover preexisting conditions and the premiums are out of reach, especially for people over 70 or so. Staying connected with doctors and hospitals in the US is the most logical thing for us, we make several trips a year to see our doctors but are prepared to pay for care here in MX as needed," commented one expat who moved to Merida.

"If you are planning on gettin a permanent recidency visa you could look into getting in the public insurance program, I think it is called IMSS, but they have a long list of pre existing conditions and some of those take years to expire, in other words if you do not have the conditions, but get it in a set amout of time, it will not be cover, you do have to pay a yearly fee but it would be cheaper than private. I think your best option would be to live close to the border and cover any minor issues out of pocket and cross to the US for anything major, there are medifvac insurance programs that you can look into," said another expat.

"I had such a profound experience when I did NOT have health insurance, that it actually propelled me to work for a company that specifically offers private insurance to expats. About 16 years ago, I was hit by a taxi cab while crossing the street. I ended up in a public hospital and all I can say was I felt better out of that hospital than in it. The conditions were beyond terrible. So I went on a search for private health insurance which allowed me to use any PRIVATE hospital and covered me when traveling and in the US. If something really major happened, I would want to be treated in the US. So my insurance covers me anywhere in the world and I am able to choose where I get treatment, at any private hospital. The price is a fraction of what I was paying in the US - even with my employers portions. I am 50 and my husband is 58, we have a $1000 deductible and we pay about $2900 for the year. If anyone needs assistance, I am happy to help. I am technically "retired" so I am not trying to push anyone into insurance. I just know the challenges I had personally to sort through finding a policy with sufficient coverage at an affordable price," remarked another expat in Huatulco.

"I only have Medicare part A. It is pretty much useless stateside or elsewhere. For a time I purchase dental insurance but gave it up because it's cost was higher than the cost of the care I received," remarked another expat living in Tijuana.

"Unfortunately, when I moved abroad I was hit by a taxi. I was taken to a public hospital. That experience was life changing... I had never seen the conditions that I saw there - bathrooms with no soap or tp - group recovery rooms - disorder. I immediately realized the importance of have PRIVATE health insurance, and went on a mission to find suitable insurance for my family. As we love to travel I found insurance that allows us to be covered ANYWHERE in the WORLD including the US - at a fraction of the price we were paying when living in the US. We can choose ANY HOSPITAL OR DOCTOR that we wish. The policy is in English, the office is located in Playa Del Carmen with courtesy translation service, and there is an in-claims department, finally they are partnered with an international law firm. I felt that was soooo important to myself and my expat friends, that I asked for a job selling this insurance. I have been retired for 15 years, but got into this business because it is something that I feel passionate about and know that all my expat friends need," said one expat living in Playa Del Carmen.

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

What are emergency services like in Mexico?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

When we asked about emergency services, members in Mexico wrote:

"Tequisquiapan has a NUMBER of private hospitals. I cannot tell you about them as I travel TO QUERETARO for my health issues. I live in Tequisquiapan, Queretaro. For an expat, myself, I found myself unfortunately over the past 2 years needing healthcare. 1. Shoulder surgery 2. I was "found" by the ONLY venomous spider in all of Mexico and 3. I fell in Costco in Queretaro slipping on water on the floor and broke my hip. I have Medicare in the USA but it does you NO GOOD in Mexico. Period. Call me jaded but i cannot see paying for 2 health insurances at the same time. I am seriously considering stopping Medicare (after 3 years here) as it is useless here and why waste $200 a month? ," commented one expat living in Queretaro City and Tequisquiapan, Mexico.

"The public hospital, the Red Cross, and the Marine hospital are all right next to each other on the main road in town. It is best to call for an ambulance from the Red Cross by dialing (958) 587-1188. For a fee of $40 USD a year, you will have free ambulance service," added another expat.

"I know of 3 hospitals in the area. Mexico General, Angeles Hosp. and Hospital Mexico are the ones I have heard of and I think 2 of them are public with nobody I have met telling horror stories, but I have not been to a hospital since the 80s and have not idea how one would get an ambulance. ," commented one expat who moved to Tijuana.

"Again,the best hospitals are PRIVATE - CostaMed and Hospitan. They are both located on the main highway that runs between Tulum and Cancun. In case of an emergency you simply dial "911". Of course, depending on your emergency, a patient may be brought to one of the hospitals mentioned above until stabilized and possibly moved to Cancun -where there are larger facilities and more medical equipment," said another expat.

"We live in PV 6 months of the year in our condo there and are just a 5 minute walk from 2 private first rate hospitals, Medasist and CMQ in downtown Puerto Vallarta. You can literally walk in and be seen immediately by a doctor in Emergency. I was admitted for 2 days in 2015 for bronchitis. I had a large private room with a window, couch, large bathroom and everything was absolutely spotless and shining clean... floors etc. Nurses uniforms new and clean also. I speak Spanish so I was able to communicate with all my caregivers. The food was excellent, delicious actually. The lady at the front desk, who was also in charge of activating insurance quickly and efficiently coordinated with my insurance provider so that I was not out of pocket at all in the admission stage where they normally ask for a credit card. I was recommend insisting at this stage that the hospital contact your insurance company to take care of all costs or you will end up paying something and having to claim it back. For a 2 day stay, my bill was around $2355 USD," remarked another expat in Puerto Vallarta.

"I live about 10 minutes from the hospital zone which is crammed with care facilities of every kind. One of the best is the Muguerza. There are many. Care is as good as anywhere in the world. The national system has specialist hospitals such as maternity, skeletal, cardiac, etc," remarked another expat living in Monterrey.

William Russell Health Insurance

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

Learn MoreGET A QUOTE

William Russell Health Insurance

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

Learn MoreGET A QUOTE

Will I need to travel to see a specialist?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

"This is a bit long, but you asked and I wish I had known before all of this happened to me. I have been in 3 hospitals (PRIVATE) in Queretaro. 1 for shoulder in Juraquilla and 2 in Qro. proper. ALL were extremely up to date, clean and better than the last on in Texas I had to go to. The staff of Dr's is amazing. ALL of my Dr's have spoken English, which is good because my Spanish is poco! 1. a good orthopedic surgeon 2. a good Internist! When I was extremely ill, and not knowing why, and my little housekeeper saying I had to go to a Dr., I ended up calling a friend in Qro. and she helped with finding me an English speaking Internist. Little did i know he is an amazing Professor that has taught most all of my other Dr.s. This was when we found the spider bite and i was immediately admitted into San Jose Hospital in Queretaro. I was there for 7 days with multiple IV, Oxygen etc. Private room. I ended up with a team of 7 Dr's. I had no idea about this spider nor how bad it is. I have been told I was lucky to be alive. The ONLY thing at San Jose was I was a single woman and thy kept hounding me about WHO was going to take care of me and How was I going to pay? They expect some family member to stay with you 24/7. I told them that wasn't going to happen unless it was one of my 4 legged dogs. They weren't too sure about that and we DID have a big go round about this when they started yelling at one of my visitors as to why they weren't there to take care of me. Be forewarned! So I had a 'team' of Dr.'s that all speak English in place. I had talked to another Orthopedist last fall when I found a 'hole' left by CEA in front of my house. So when I fell, I pretty much knew where I wanted to go, and where my Dr's were all located. BIG THING before they will look at you or admit you, you usually have to put up a deposit of $10,000 pesos.($500 usd). But, you will be refunded what you do not use. Emergency room fee (also included my Ambulance ride) and you can call your Dr you want to see you. I ended up with X-rays, an CT scan. My Dr. came and I was in surgery at 9 pm and even had my anesthesiologist (I see 2 times a year for pain injection management for my shoulder Dr. in Texas screwed up) HOSPITAL H plus is where I wanted to go. Clean, all my Dr's in one place. The ONLY thing I have an issue with is for a major surgery (plate and 6 screws) they only kept me 2 days then sent me "home". There are ** NO REHAB FACILITIES *** fortunately I had a Mexican family to look after me in their home for the next 8 weeks. Since then I have Physical Therapist that come to MY home to give therapy. Would I return to USA for medical Care. Everyone is different. But NO, honestly I feel my Dr's, each and every one are better than what I had in the USA! They are compassionate, very well educated - some even in USA and then come back to Mx to practice. Everyone is different and expects different ...... I am a Nurse by trade so I am very picky. Summary: The issues I have I've stated above. 1. They want someone of your family to stay with you in hospital for your care. ( That is what a nurse is getting paid to do, tell them that!) 2. No Rehab facilities. 3. Prices are CHEAP at private hospitals compared to USA. AND, watch out for Violinista Spiders. ," added another expat.

"Expats tend to travel to Mexico city for major health issues. This is about a half hour plane ride. It is important though to have PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE with Air Ambulance service," commented one expat who moved to Huatulco.

"The bulk of people I have met getting medical care in Tijuana live in the US and travel to receive their care. Tijuana, as a large border town is easy to get to and has many Doctors and dentists. People don't generally care to be evacuated to go to a country with worse care. I no longer go there now that my major dental issue is over, and now that I have moved to a more distant place," said another expat.

"If I had the option, and I DO because I have international health insurance, I am covered in the US as well as anywhere in the world. Without a doubt, if physically possible, I would go to the US for anything major. If I was unable to travel back to the US, many people use the faculties in Cancun and Merida simply due to the fact that these are more populated areas and as a result have better equipped hospitals," remarked another expat in Playa Del Carmen.

"There are many specialists in Puerto Vallarta and you can usually make an appointment within 2 days and the cost is about 500 pesos (less than $50)," remarked another expat living in Puerto Vallarta.

Are common prescription medications available in Mexico?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

"Pretty much. Cheaper than USA costs and many different pharmacies. Guadalajara and Aahorra," remarked another expat living in Queretaro City and Tequisquiapan.

"Common prescriptions medicines are available locally and we have an abundance of pharmacies here. Most medications do not require a prescription with the exception of antibiotics. There are generic options here and prices are quite low compared to the US," said one expat living in Huatulco.

"The farmacias have a huge stock of remedies. Most are fairly inexpensive. Many don't require a prescription. Others do. The only one I had difficulty finding required visiting 6 farmacias but the usual experience is finding what you need on the 1st try. ," mentioned another expat in Tijuana.

"Common prescriptions in the US do not require prescriptions in Mexico. There is an abundance of pharmacies everywhere in Mexico. Prices can vary greatly so it pays to shop around. Similares Pharmacies only offer generic brands and offer a further discount on Mondays. In general the cost of medicine is much cheaper in Mexico. All antibiotics require a prescription. ," commented one expat who moved to Playa Del Carmen, Mexico.

"Farmacia Guadalajara is a chain, so you are reasonably sure of the quality of the drugs and since their prices are standardized, chain-wise, you are reasonably sure that you are not paying the gringo price at one of the tourist pharmacies. Many common drugs available. Also Freddy's on Olas Altas," remarked one expat living in Puerto Vallarta.

"Most medicines are available without a prescription except for psychotropic and antibiotics. Generic medicines are freely available, this means that medicines in general cost a fraction of the price you'd be charged in, say, the USA," commented another person.

"All hospitals and clinics are 10-15 minutes from any point in the city. Many. many medical options to choose from. They have both public, which might be a long wait, and private, substantially below USA costs," mentioned another expat in Merida.

"We have several hospitals/clinics in town. But it is important that you go to a PRIVATE HOSPITAL. Expats will not be accustomed to using a public hospital in Mexico and I do NOT recommend it. The private hospitals are clean, take the patients right away, easy to get appointments without waiting for months, doctors speak English, doctors have an extra certification to work there, and overall you will have very good experience...as long as you have health insurance! I ran into an issue of not having health insurance and ended up in a public hospital. Not an experience I want to repeat. So, I now have a policy that allows me to choose ANY PRIVATE HOSPITAL OR DOCTOR ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD. My coverage also includes the US - but this is an option. I am paying a fraction of the price that I paid in the US. I love to travel and this insurance gives me piece of mind. If you need info please let me know," commented one expat who moved to Playa Del Carmen, Mexico.

"We have one major private hospital in Playa. This is a really important thing to me as the public hospitals are not up to par with what expats are accustomed to coming from the US, Canada or Europe. The care is really outstanding in the private hospitals with most doctors speaking fluent English. They are also required to have an additional level of training to be able to work in a private hospital. I have been retired for 15 years but I actually sell international health insurance to expats which allows us to use ANY PRIVATE hospital or doctor in the world. I got involved in this because I was hit by a taxi cab about 15 years ago while traveling and ended up in a public hospital. The conditions were so bad - no soap or toilet paper in the bathrooms - 50 people in a group room..... I never wanted to be in that situation ever again. That was when I went quest for international health insurance. It is something critical to have," remarked one expat living in Playa Del Carmen.

"3 miles, there are 2, there is a Red Cross ambulance 2 blocks from my house and the fire dept (Bomberos) ambulance is 3 blocks away, we have a 911 system," commented another person.

"I am very close to the many pharmacies for medicines. Also there are bi-lingual doctors' offices in many places downtown. There are several hospitals nearby within a few miles. I have heard that the quality of care is very good. But, I have not had personal experience yet, thank goodness," said another expat living in Playa del Carmen.

As a foreigner living in Mexico, will I have access to public healthcare? What is it like?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

"I have no idea. Getting to a Dr. in Tequisquiapan is easy. You just ask someone where a good Dr. is and that is where you go. The best Drs are at their private hospitals," remarked another expat living in Queretaro City and Tequisquiapan.

"Currently the Mexican heath care system is being revised by the new President MACRO. They are doing away with one of the options that is often abused by expats which is meant to be used by the poorest of poor Mexicans. This option I would never recommend regardless as the doctors in many cases have not finished their education and you are taking a huge risk. Then there is another option which employers are required to contribute a portion to your coverage. But, as expats the most popular option is to purchase PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE. Pre-existing conditions are usually not covered. Public hospitals are not up to the US standards in the majority of cases, which is why most expats choose to use PRIVATE hospitals with PRIVATE insurance coverage," said one expat living in Huatulco.

"I believe there is a public healthcare system for Mexican citizens, but I don't think it covers foreigners. Most people I have met seeking Mexican medical care travel to Mexico either because they can't afford care in the US or are seeking treatment that is inferior in the US. Most are paying out of pocket rather than through insurance, as Mexican care often costs less than the insurance would cost. Most visit clinics rather than hospitals, by researching the individual practitioners. Thus I have heard little about the quality of hospital care," mentioned another expat in Tijuana.

"As an expat, MOST people will purchase their own Expat Insurance which covers you in any PRIVATE HOSPITAL and allows you to use ANY DOCTOR you wish. Some policies can be quite expensive but others are actually very reasonably priced. For example a mother of 52 with two girls 11 and 13 pays about USD $1900 a year and the coverage INCLUDES the United States. only about $1000 EXCLUDING the United States. This is with a $1000 deductible. This is about the minimum starting point. But, the price of US coverage is just a FRACTION of what you would pay if you lived in the United States. Private insurance will typically exclude pre-existing conditions, but this is on a case-by-case basis. If you work in Mexico, you will have basic medical coverage called IMSS. All employers are required to pay into the system and it is like a socialized form of medical care for Mexico. It is BASIC because IMSS hospitals are not extravagant and will require you to produce a lot of paperwork and will also require a lot of time and patience. There is also health care for the poorest of the poor. In order to enroll you will be asked certain questions like - "is your floor dirt or tile", "do you own a tv"? If you have the means, I would recommend going Private as I can not recommend the public system or hospitals. If you are from the US, you will not be accustomed to the public hospitals and having to deal with the mountains of paperwork in Spanish. ," commented one expat who moved to Playa Del Carmen, Mexico.

What have your experiences during the pandemic with the local healthcare system been like?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

"Suffered a ruptured lung requiring surgery. treatment was outstanding and affordable," said another expat.

"THis nurse was the only healthcare facility I needed. I really have no idea where I would go if I got really sick???," remarked another expat in La Mision.

"Most everyone is wearing a mask. No stupid protests about encroaching on their rights," remarked another expat living in Lake Chapala.

"I had an extremely positive experience when I was ill from eating. Top notch experience. But they are not prepared for Covid," said one expat living in Lake Chapala.

"In Mexico City there are private hospitals that do not treat covid patients. So they are not saturated and can treat regular visits as well. The covid hospitals should be avoided though," mentioned another expat in Mexico City.

"I had a COVID test and that went well and the staff was professional. Thank God I have stayed healthy," commented one expat who moved to Mexico City, Mexico.

Are healthcare services good in Mexico?

Live in Mexico? Answer this Question

We asked people if they have access to good medical care in Mexico. They wrote:

"A few weeks ago I used my GEHA (government employees health association) insurance at Hospital San Antonio. Well I should say I tried to use it. At first the staff at Hospital San Antonio said that my entire emergency would be covered but they charged my $25000 USD UP Front and I had to pay it or the administrative staff there told me they would send me to a public hospital in the worst part of Guadalajara. They bullied me and I felt so uncomfortable but I was not in a position to fight. I paid the up front fee and then on discharge they just deducted it from the bill which I still had to pay and they gave me a bill with codes to submit to my insurer for reimbursement...such lies and thieves trying to trick people about accepting insurances. I will never go back to Hospital San Antonio in Tlyacapan," explained one expat.

"Yes, in San Miguel and Queretero nearby we have excellent care and it’s reasonably priced," said another person in San Miguel de Allende .

"Medical care here is excellent and reasonable. For most things, it is possible to pay out-of-pocket, but it's good to have some sort of health insurance for catastrophes," remarked another expat in Mazatlan.

"Yes, but the quality is not uniform. However, as this area is growing in population (both Mexican and expat), new medical facilities are being built that should improve the quality, access and expense," explained one expat living in Lake Chapala.

"Yes, I get 100% medical services such as Doctors, Hospitals, Operations & Medicines for free through the ISSTE system. My Wife was an English teacher at a Federal School so I was able to enter the system as her spouse," said another expat in Apizaco.

"We have not had to use hospital services as of yet. However, Guadalajara has exceptional hospitals that are affordable and an hour away. Local dentist and medical services receive high marks from those living here any length of time," added another person living in Ajijic.

About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

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Playa del Carmen, Mexico

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Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
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William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance

Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
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Learn what members have to say about living in Mexico.

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Talk with other digital nomads and expats in Mexico on our Mexico forum - meet people, get advice and help others.

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Advice for people renting and buying real estate in Mexico.

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Take off your rose-colored glasses and learn what digital nomads & expats have to say about the biggest challenges and the greatest rewards of living in Mexico.

Cost of Living in MexicoCost of Living in Mexico

Digital Nomads & Expats offer insight into the cost of living in Mexico.

Digital-Nomad-Visa-for-MexicoDigital Nomad Visa for Mexico

Find essential information about the digital nomad visa for working in Mexico.

12-Best-Places-to-Live-in-Mexico-in-202212 Best Places to Live in Mexico in 2022

Mexico is increasing in popularity among expats, snowbirds, digital nomads and retirees in 2022. Learn about the 12 Best Places to Live in Mexico in 2022 according to people already living there.

Living-in-Mexico-Guide-2022Living in Mexico Guide 2022

Our Living in Mexico Guide is an introduction to everything about the basics for moving to Mexico: best places to live, cost of living, pros and cons, healthcare and insurance, and more.

Cost-of-Living-in-MexicoCost of Living in Mexico

The cost of living in Mexico is one of the first topics considered by expats exploring the idea of moving there. Here's an idea of what your expenses will be if you choose to one of the expat hotspots in Mexico.

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