Insider’s Guide to Health Care in Riga

Learn about the health system in Riga: how it can and cannot be used by expats, nomads, retirees and others moving to and living in Riga.

Riga, the capital of Latvia, has a public and private healthcare system. The public healthcare system is called the Latvian Health Insurance Fund and is used by both locals and foreigners. People generally recommend using public hospitals in Riga for serious medical emergencies and major surgery. Public hospitals in Riga are generally well-equipped and staffed with experienced medical professionals. Foreigners, including expats and digital nomads, are allowed to use the public healthcare system in Latvia. However, many expats choose to use private hospitals for specialized medical care and major surgeries. Private hospitals in Riga are typically well-equipped and staffed with experienced medical professionals. People generally recommend using private hospitals for serious medical emergencies and major surgery.

Hospitals and Clinics for Expats in Riga

Riga has several recommended clinics and hospitals for expats. The Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital is a public hospital located in the city center. It is well-equipped and specializes in emergency care, surgery, and oncology. The Riga East Clinical University Hospital is a public hospital located in the east of the city. It specializes in emergency care, surgery, and cardiology. The Riga Stradins University is a private hospital located in the city center. It specializes in emergency care, surgery, and oncology. The Riga Red Cross Hospital is a private hospital located in the city center. It specializes in emergency care, surgery, and cardiology.

Emergency Services in Riga

Riga has ambulance services that can be called by dialing 112. Ambulances typically arrive quickly, but there can be delays depending on the situation.

Health Insurance Companies in Riga

The most popular private health insurers in Riga are BTA, Balta, and ERGO. These companies offer health insurance plans for both locals and expats. Expats typically use these companies or specialized expat health insurance providers.

Insider Tips from Expats in Riga: Health Care

“I’ve been living in Riga for a while now, and I can tell you that it’s definitely possible to live comfortably on $5,000 a month, even if you’re used to modern amenities. In fact, you might not have to make many sacrifices at all. Riga is a beautiful city with a relatively low cost of living compared to other European capitals.When it comes to housing, you can find a nice apartment in a good neighborhood for around $1,000 to $1,500 a month. Some of the more affordable neighborhoods to consider are ?genskalns, Imanta, and Purvciems. These areas are a bit further from the city center, but they still have good public transportation connections and plenty of shops, restaurants, and parks nearby.If you’re looking for something more upscale, you might want to check out neighborhoods like the Old Town, Centrs, or Me┼żaparks. These areas are more expensive, but they offer a more luxurious lifestyle with beautiful architecture, high-end shops, and fine dining options. However, I would recommend avoiding these neighborhoods if you’re trying to stick to a $5,000 a month budget, as the cost of living can be significantly higher.As for other expenses, groceries and dining out are quite affordable in Riga. You can expect to spend around $300 to $400 a month on groceries, and eating out at a mid-range restaurant will usually cost you around $10 to $20 per person. Public transportation is also very affordable, with a monthly pass costing around $50.When it comes to entertainment and leisure activities, there’s plenty to do in Riga without breaking the bank. You can visit museums, art galleries, and historical sites for a small fee, or enjoy the city’s many parks and outdoor spaces for free. There are also plenty of affordable bars and clubs where you can enjoy a night out without spending too much.Overall, I think you’ll find that living in Riga on a $5,000 a month budget is not only possible but also quite comfortable. You might have to make some small adjustments, like choosing a more affordable neighborhood or cutting back on luxury purchases, but you’ll still be able to enjoy a high quality of life and all the modern amenities you’re used to,” commented an expat living in Riga.

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.

Additional Information:

Now Health International

Now Health International
Live Healthier, Live Happier with award winning international health insurance.
GET A QUOTE

Copyright 1997-2023 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal

LoginJoinPlease Login to Continue. New? Join today (it's free).
Since 1997, we've supported millions of people as they explore the world and share the adventures and challenges of living abroad.