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Essential Guide to the Health System in Mexico City

Explore healthcare options for expatriates and digital nomads in Mexico City: uncover top-rated providers, hospitals, and medical facilities to meet your needs while living abroad in Mexico City.
Essential Guide to the Health System in Mexico City

Mexico City has both public and private healthcare systems, with the public system being called the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). It is used by both locals and foreigners, although many expats and digital nomads opt for private healthcare.

Mexico’s Healthcare System

The public healthcare system in Mexico City is provided by the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). It is used by both locals and foreigners, although many expats and digital nomads opt for private healthcare. Public hospitals in Mexico City are generally considered to be of lower quality than private hospitals, and many people do not recommend using them for serious medical emergencies or major surgery. However, foreigners are allowed to use the public healthcare system in Mexico, and some expats do use it. Private hospitals in Mexico City are generally of higher quality than public hospitals, and many people recommend using them for serious medical emergencies and major surgery. Private hospitals typically offer more modern facilities and better customer service than public hospitals.

Hospitals and Clinics for Expats in Mexico City

There are several recommended clinics and hospitals in Mexico City for expats. These include:

  • Hospital Angeles Pedregal (private): located in the south of Mexico City, this hospital specializes in orthopedics, oncology, and cardiology.
  • Hospital ABC Santa Fe (private): located in the north of Mexico City, this hospital specializes in oncology, cardiology, and neurology.
  • Hospital San Angel Inn (private): located in the south of Mexico City, this hospital specializes in orthopedics, oncology, and cardiology.
  • Hospital √Āngeles Tlalpan (private): located in the south of Mexico City, this hospital specializes in oncology, cardiology, and neurology.

Emergency Services in Mexico City

Mexico City has ambulance services, which can be called by dialing 066. Ambulances usually arrive quickly, although there can be delays in some cases.

Health Insurance Companies in Mexico City

The most popular private health insurers in Mexico City are Seguro Popular, IMSS, and GNP. Expats and digital nomads typically use these companies, although some may opt for specialized expat health insurance providers.

Insider Tips from Expats in Mexico City: Health Care

“I’ve been living in Mexico City for a while now, and I can tell you that it’s definitely possible to live comfortably on $5,000 a month, especially if you’re used to modern amenities. In fact, you might even find that you can enjoy a higher standard of living here than you would in many other cities around the world. However, there are some sacrifices you might have to make in order to make it work.First, you’ll need to choose the right neighborhood. Mexico City is a huge place, and the cost of living can vary greatly depending on where you decide to live. Some of the more affordable neighborhoods that still offer a good quality of life include Condesa, Roma, and Del Valle. These areas have a nice mix of residential and commercial spaces, and you’ll find plenty of restaurants, bars, and shops within walking distance. On the other hand, neighborhoods like Polanco and Lomas de Chapultepec are more upscale and expensive, so you might want to avoid those if you’re trying to stick to a budget.In terms of housing, you’ll probably need to downsize a bit compared to what you might be used to. Apartments in Mexico City tend to be smaller than those in the US or Europe, and you might find that you need to get creative with your living space in order to make everything fit. However, you should still be able to find a nice, modern apartment with all the amenities you need for around $1,000 to $1,500 a month, depending on the neighborhood.One thing to keep in mind is that while many things in Mexico City are relatively inexpensive, imported goods can be quite pricey. If you’re used to buying a lot of imported products, you might need to adjust your shopping habits and learn to live with more local products. This can actually be a fun and interesting experience, as you’ll get to try new foods and discover new brands that you might not have encountered otherwise.Another potential sacrifice is that you might need to rely more on public transportation than you’re used to. While Mexico City does have a decent public transportation system, it can be crowded and not always as reliable as you might like. However, it’s generally quite affordable, and you can save a lot of money by using it instead of owning a car.Overall, I think you’ll find that living in Mexico City on $5,000 a month is not only possible but can actually be quite enjoyable. You’ll need to make some adjustments and be willing to adapt to a new way of life, but in the end, you’ll likely find that the experience is well worth it,” commented an expat living in Mexico City.

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.

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