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Residency as an investor?

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PuraVida
10/15/2018 11:43 EST

If an expat buys a home for $350,000 and applies for residency as an investor, how much will the CAJA charge each month?

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Kohl
10/15/2018 12:32 EST

Investor and Rentista premiums are much higher than for a Pensionado, And even more so, if one is under 55.

Unfortunately, you won't know what your premium will be until the final step of the application process.

http://www.usexpatcostarica.com/arcr-rate-hike-for-caja-plan/

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princzz
10/15/2018 14:10 EST

No one no matter age will know until the final meeting.

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princzz
10/15/2018 14:24 EST

According to this amount, and depending on the questions at time of enrollment, or will be 7.8 to 11.1% of your income v dependents and expenses.

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Kohl
10/15/2018 16:18 EST

Although CCSS staff may ask a few questions about expenses, when you own a house, they won't give you a reduction. Neither will having car expenses, cable, etc. as these are not 'necessities.'

A friend who recently lost her husband, recently signed up as a 'single' and no longer a 'dependant' with a very low pension and even though she told them her rent, she had no reductions at all.

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Zack59
10/16/2018 13:05 EST

May US health care expenses such as Medicare supplements be considered for reductions?

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Kohl
10/16/2018 14:57 EST

No. Neither will private health insurance here.

Very few expenses will be considered. Rent, electricity and food are they costs they may ask about...but please don't count on the premiums to be lowered.

I've never actually met anyone that has had their premium lowered...8-(

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carolvaughn
10/16/2018 15:05 EST

I had my premium lowered just a little
when I turned 65, officially retired, and
brought them documents proving it.
I was paying close to $300 in US for
health insurance, and pay $52 here.
Good health care, also. Health care is
a MUCH better deal here than in US.

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shermanwc
10/16/2018 15:56 EST

My wife and I obtained Rentista residency and applied for CAJA, in 2013, when in our early 60s. We reported our income as $2500/month and completed a form with living expense categories such as rent, utilities, food, health care, etc. We were given a very low CAJA rate (well under $100). But I've heard of others that were given much higher rates. Unfortunately it seems to depend upon your location and who you get to review your application and set the rate. There is no way to be sure in advance!

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shermanwc
10/16/2018 16:02 EST

We know a young couple that applied under Investor status and were given a very high CAJA rate (over $400/month). Most of their investment money went into starting some businesses in CR, and their monthly income was not very high. They were very upset that the CAJA rate they got seemed to be based on the value of money invested rather than their actual income from the businesses.

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Kohl
10/16/2018 17:19 EST

" They were very upset that the CAJA rate they got seemed to be based on the value of money invested" and that is exactly how they, the CAJA, decide on the premium,

Of course, if under 55, the premiums are even higher. The more expensive the property, the more the 'Investor' pays. I have heard from many sources about the $400+ premiums...and some have 'bailed out' at the last moment. When the property is valued over the $200k they could then find themselves having to pay an additional, annual 'luxury tax'. Just like Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister found out. 8-)

We applied as 'Rentistas' before these 'new rules' cam into effect. I doubt they will be lowered. Canadians get the 'double whammy' with the low dollar and for some, if they have became a 'non-resident for tax purposes' and had their Canadian funds withheld.

Some new residents choose to join the ARCR group plan, if only because they know in advance what their premium will be, if only because they know in advance what their premium will be.

www.arcr.net

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-manitoba-premier-brian-pallister-pays-8000-in-back-taxes-and/

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princzz
10/16/2018 18:08 EST

That's "Your friend." It all depends on the agent in front of you....there is supposed to be set rules...but no.

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k8esdad
7/22/2019 10:43 EST

My wife and I attended Chris Howard's program last December (www.liveincostarica.com). The 1st 3 days was a presentation by ARCR. They brought in legal, financial, insurance, dental, logistics (and other) experts. It appears to me that, in order to get a fair shake with CAJA (and other things Costa Rican), you should probably engage professionals (these being vetted by ARCR gives them more credibility). Even though a lot of things CAN be diy, having a local take care of it for you will be worth far more than their fee. (There was one individual that was not being treated fairly by the CAJA administrator where she lived and the expert there had a solution ready for her.)

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peter2017
7/22/2019 19:41 EST

Under rentista category we are paying 118 thousand colones and some change.

Under the investor category you will pay more.

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Kohl
7/22/2019 22:17 EST

Your age will determine what you will pay. If the principal is 55 and under, you may end up pay twice what a 55+ will pay. This 'usually' applies to both Investor and Rentista applicants... tut the more expensive the property the higher your monthly premium will be.

Unfortunately, what an expert is CAJA says they can do, it really depends on the person in the CAJA office that you are dealing with.

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