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Retiring in Argentina.

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Travelseeker
5/29/2019 09:25 EST

Hello,I've been looking for a place to retire with my husband and Argentina is one of our places.
I wonder is there a visa called Jubilado or Pensionado(spelling ?) in Argentina ?
I also wonder what else do they offer to retirees who has sufficient income with clean background but unable to apply for investment/business or academic visa without leaving a country every 90 days to renew your tourist visa ?
I understand their economy isn't doing well recent years and risk of some economical loss.
I hope to hear what other people similar to our situation has gone through. Any suggestions,tips and advises are greatly appreciated.
Thank you.

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Nelmi
5/29/2019 10:19 EST

Hello,

As far as I know there is not a visa category for pensioners. You qualify on grounds of being married to an Argentine, having children born in Argentina, Argentine family or by investing in Argentina. Before you start with the permanent residency process, you will unfortunately have to leave the country every 90 days and come back. Once the permanent residency process has been started, you will have to present yourself to Immigration and have the certificate renewed every 90 days. This continuous until your Argentine DNI has been issued. This DNI is valid for 2 years and then you will be able to apply for the Permanent Residency which is a simple process as long as you adhered to the conditions for the temporary two year residency permit.

Hope it helps.

Nelieta

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todikaios
5/29/2019 10:40 EST

In late 2015 I completed the process to get a Pension Visa so I could get a National Identity Card (DNI). It cost me about $2000 with all of the necessary travel to State offices to get the documents (birth certificate, proof of US pension, police check, etc.) and take them to the Argentine consulate in NYC - translated into Spanish of course. After getting it I learned that I would have to renew it annually for a minimum of 3 years, and would have to live in Argentina for at least 6 months plus 1 day, continuously, during that period, and I had to notify whenever I left. Suffice it to say I could not meet those terms, so I then arranged to have a sponsor agree to complete some more paperwork and more $$ (about $1000) so I could get a Certificado de Convivencia which justified me getting a permanent DNI (good for 15 years). So, if you are going to stay Argentina for at least 6 months plus 1 day continuously per year, then spend the $$ and go through the arduous work to get a pension visa and apply for the one year DNI, and renew it each year for 3 years or so, and then get a permanent DNI. E-Mail me at todikaios@cs.com if you want to converse privately.

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Travelseeker
5/29/2019 18:34 EST

I'm replying to ' todikaios'. Thank you for sharing what you went through and will contact you to your account. My husband has his own questions, so he might contact you as well. I hope it's acceptable arrangement.
Thanks again.

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todikaios
5/29/2019 21:11 EST

For Travelseeker:

Okie Dokie....I will look forward to your E-Mails and will check my spam box just in case. Glad to help.

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Travelseeker
5/29/2019 22:58 EST

Todikaios,
Thanks for offering help.


travelseeker

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Knowing567
6/4/2019 07:37 EST

Hi Travelseeker,
I also looked into Argentina trying to decide what is better for us, Argentina or Chile. I do not know if you are aware of the taxes on foreign income for retirees. Few countries in the world offer no tax on Social Security and pensions from the USA (or other countries), Chile being one.
For Argentina it can get to 30 or 35% of your income. I wanted to get a clear answer (see my post "foreign income tax" on page 3 of this forum and the subsequent answers) but I am still not sure. Maybe you can find more about it, in order to make your decision.

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TomP
6/4/2019 09:22 EST

Knowing,

A sincere question, is the country with the most favorable "Tax" treatment where you will live?

Or, will you live in the country you like best and make the best of its tax structure?

The two objectives are differ dramatically.

Chile is not Argentina.

Argentina is not Chile.

Uruguay is not Chile or Argentina.

And within each country there is a multitude of different cities with different cultures.

I suggest you research cities until you have narrowed down your choice of cities.

Then visit each city for a week or so. This will allow you to eliminate many cities from your list. Then stay a few weeks in each city that has caught your attention.

If you decide to make the move to a city-don't buy a home until you have lived there for at least six months. I cannot count the number of Americans I met who threw in the towel in the first year because one spouse or both did not like the people, or the city or the country.

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todikaios
6/4/2019 09:52 EST

For those who are retired and looking to move (not make long visits) to a new country where they don’t know the language, customs, etc., my question is: why? I’m not always happy with all that takes place here in the USA but every time I return from one of my extended jaunts to Argentina or Spain or Asia, etc., I am always thankful for the “comforts” of home in the USA. I have enjoyed many pleasant stays in other countries but have almost always had to make some unpleasant or undesired adjustments, so at the end of the Day, I am most at peace and content to spend a good portion of my time in the USA.

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TomP
6/4/2019 10:07 EST

todikaios,

A great grasp of traveling abroad, it is always nice to return home.

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Jantango
6/23/2019 21:11 EST

Travelseeker,

Yes, there is a pensioner visa in Argentina. The reply saying otherwise is incorrect.

I've lived in Buenos Aires for 20 years. I am retired, own a small apartment, live on $500US per month, and attend free concerts several times each week. I have a great life here. It takes time to adjust. I live without a car since the bus and subte lines run all the time in the city -- 50 cents a ride. I am a naturalized citizen since 2013.

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todikaios
6/24/2019 00:38 EST

Be careful of posting too rosy a picture. While many buses do run 24 hrs/day, the subte does not...only an average of 17-18 hrs/day. Yes, if you already own an apartment and don’t need to pay rent, and only have to pay a small fee to the ownership group of the building, and you don’t eat out very much, and your other personal expenses are very low, then you can “scrape” by on $500 a month, but it certainly won’t be in any way “middle American” lifestyle. You are correct that there is a pension visa, but it is not free and takes considerable time and expense to secure. Gaining residency in Argentina is a chore and without it there are many restrictions, especially related to working and financial matters. If you stay long enuf you can make the adjustment, but I still believe there are other options worth pursuing. I enjoy visiting la Argentina but I am not of the mind to invest my $$ or most of my life in this country. Others may have other goals or interests that would reach different conclusions, but I am of the strong opinion that the majority of US citizens have a completely incorrect romantic view of la Argentina. The golden age has past, and a fresh, in person looksee is necessary for a correct perspective.

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Travelseeker
6/24/2019 06:38 EST

Thank You Jantango,
Please feel free to simplify the process. Make sure your information is up to date and current

Thanks
Travelseeker

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Travelseeker
6/24/2019 06:48 EST

Tokadias,
Thanks for the realistic outlook on retirement in Argentina. We have have visited from the U.S.A. and Latin America for approx 15 years now. Most recent visit was this past April 2019. I see that the romantic Buenos Aires has changed, but that's alright. I wouldn't mind the long waiting process as long as I could relocate to Argentina and live there during the process until complete.

Sincerely,
Travelseeker

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jlscott201
7/13/2019 12:20 EST

My wife is from Argentina and we were married in Argentina and has a permanent green card. We have decided to move to Argentina. I have a retirement income and a little in savings. Do we have to go thru the visa process to move there other than my retirement Private Income / Retiree Visa? Thanks

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TomP
7/13/2019 15:06 EST

Just curious, what area will you move to?

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pampas
7/13/2019 20:52 EST

As you are pretty much covered by having an Argentine wife, I suggest you just come here and do not give the thirsty state a reason to enquire about your retirement. Just get a dni so you can have a bank account or directly have your wife get it in her name.
I would not worry about visa requirements. If they want you they will come after you.

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