International Mail Forwarding with US Global Mail

Mexico Expat Forum

Its the Pollution!

Post New Topic
JasmineinNM
2/19/2016 10:01 EST

I live in the area of Ajijic/Chapala. I have only been here for a month but the pollution is getting to me. I had no idea that this beautiful area was so heavily polluted. There is a constant haze and most days right now I can't even see across the lake. Then there is the controlled burning like a couple of days ago very near me. You could see the heavy smoke as it lingered in the area. There must have been several controlled burns on that same day because it was right after that the heavy haze filled the air. The particulate matter was really out there as I did breath some in and then got sick as a dog. Oh, the coughing has been pretty much none stop and no remedy seems to put an end to it. What to do, what to do?
I would like your experience and your opinions please. Tell me please about this pollution. Is it multiplied because we are also receiving a good dose from Guadalajara?

Post a Reply

00abuse

Crochetcrone
2/19/2016 11:31 EST

Oh no! This is not good news as we are planning to move to Lakeside soon, but I have COPD and allergies, so I need clean air and organic food. Burning wood really hits my lungs hard. I do hope we get an explanation that it isn't pollution and controlled burning is not a regular practice or it's back to the drawing board for us. Feel better soon!

Post a Reply

10abuse

expat health insurance from CIGNA

Choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA. With Cigna Global Health Options, you can create an international health insurance plan that's perfectly tailored for the needs of you and your family.

Learn More Get a Quote

nelsonokelmgmailcom
2/19/2016 11:34 EST

Look at Puerto Vallarta. Been here 29 months and loving it!!!

Post a Reply

00abuse

JasmineinNM
2/19/2016 11:41 EST

Thank you for your concern. It isn't just the controlled burn on the mountain side but also the farms burn their fields and the neighbors burn their weeds. It was the same in Ecuador too. It is also the dust that comes up from the streets which ARE paved but the sides are just dirt and the sides are used as roads to get off the streets and into businesses something like a service road. I was walking with my little cart down the highway and it never dawned on me about this because I was having fun exploring....that is until I started coughing as I walked into a business and made a comment about it and the proprietors complained then also. What the heck,,,,when you have bad lungs like you and I.....I think we would have to go pretty remote to escape it all. Best wishes

Post a Reply

00abuse

sparksmex
2/19/2016 11:43 EST

Controlled burning is done all over Mexico. How fast the smoke goes away depends on the weather and location. Lake Chapala is in a bowl

Post a Reply

10abuse

nelsonokelmgmailcom
2/19/2016 11:46 EST

Mexico City is in a bowl too. Any city in a bowl is going to have pollution problems. PV is on the pacific with frequent on shore breezes to flush the pollution away.

Post a Reply

10abuse

expat health insurance from CIGNA

Choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA. With Cigna Global Health Options, you can create an international health insurance plan that's perfectly tailored for the needs of you and your family.

Learn More Get a Quote

Crochetcrone
2/19/2016 13:03 EST

Good point! I was thinking it would be good because of it's elevation and dry climate, since I have mold allergies. Where do you live? Where would you suggest for someone who needs clean air and low mold counts? I know no place is perfect, but northern New Mexico, high desert is good for my health, but we can't afford it, and honestly, I am very drawn to the Mexican people and culture.

Post a Reply

00abuse

kittvincent
2/19/2016 13:05 EST

Really? Yes, the farmers do a burn off to prepare their land for new crops but I haven't noticed pollution or a haze. There is a flu going around that has a cough and from I have heard it is a bad one. I have a cold but no worse than a cold. It is the third one I have had in the 7 years I have lived here. I live on the west end of the lake so maybe air quality is worse where you are. But I go frequently into San Antonio and Ajijic and have not been bothered. Maybe you are more sensitive. Kitt Vincent

Post a Reply

00abuse

Crochetcrone
2/19/2016 13:09 EST

Hi Jasmine,

I am so sorry you already moved there and are finding it bad for your health. ?? Do you rent, so you can easily move? If you hear of a place that is better for avoiding the air pollution and ubiquitous burning, will you let me know? I will do the same with you, and I am going to be actively researching this issue since we want to retire in Mexico soon. And I think you are right, that we need a remote place where there are fewer neighbors burning regularly and less big city pollution blowing in. I also can't tolerate mold so humid beach climates won't work for me. I have 2 high powered air filters and a humidifier where I live in an 800 sq foot place in Southern California, and I keep my windows shut. I also wear masks. Maybe these things can help you manage the toxic load a little.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Crochetcrone
2/19/2016 13:12 EST

Hi Kitt,

Been thinking about you a lot!!! Almost emailed you last night as I know you're 2 hours later than us and a night person, but I couldn't quite make it to 11:00 pm when you'd be getting home. ??
Big smiles and hugs!

Post a Reply

00abuse

JasmineinNM
2/19/2016 13:47 EST

You know.....that may be the real reason (the flu) and the pollution is aggravating everything. I recall last week on two consecutive days having to taxi home with two different sick drivers.....then three days ago I had chills and aching in my shoulders and my tummy is still queasy. What ever the reason....the cough is ugly and deep and I can't seem to clear my lungs. I think I should go to a walk in clinic today.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Crochetcrone
2/19/2016 15:48 EST

Well, I do hope that is the case since it would be less unfortunate than the alternative. I had a wicked respiratory illness recently here in Cal. It was bacterial, not flu, so I knocked it down with antibiotics.

Post a Reply

00abuse

sparksmex
2/19/2016 15:56 EST

Might consider Cuernavaca for good weather ..... and/or Patzcuaro or Morelia for elevation

Post a Reply

10abuse

bgrateful
2/19/2016 16:45 EST

I know Mexico City and Guadalajara are very polluted and a city i went to
Cuernavaca was 75 miles away and it was polluted. I lived in San Diego and that is a polluted area also with the Military there flying all kinds of toxic stuff in the air. I went to Bucerias and Punta de Mita and San Pancho and they are pretty clean.

Post a Reply

10abuse

JasmineinNM
2/19/2016 19:22 EST

FYI
A good doctor made a house call today for me. She said this thing is viral that also went bacterial. She gave me a whoop-ass painful shot of steroids and some scripts to get filled. She said a LOT of people here have this.

Post a Reply

10abuse

Crochetcrone
2/20/2016 00:09 EST

Great news! Good to have a clearheaded nurse onboard @Kitt!

Post a Reply

00abuse

tomwins
2/20/2016 00:32 EST

I live in San Juan Cosala and know several people who have gripa (as it is called here). Someone even said it is a severe flu similar to H1N1.
A good friend has COPD and he is fine with the air quality here but that doesn't mean it isn't bothering you.
Just be aware that what you are experiencing may not be the fires but the nasty bug that is going around.

Post a Reply

00abuse

tomwins
2/20/2016 00:32 EST

I live in San Juan Cosala and know several people who have gripa (as it is called here). Someone even said it is a severe flu similar to H1N1.
A good friend has COPD and he is fine with the air quality here but that doesn't mean it isn't bothering you.
Just be aware that what you are experiencing may not be the fires but the nasty bug that is going around.

Post a Reply

10abuse

Cozumeldeb
2/20/2016 08:55 EST

We live in Cozumel, island of Q Roo/Yucatan. Being an island of course wonderful island breezes majority of time. Give us a visit..Merida in the Yucatan, may also be worth a look see, beautiful old colonial city, large ex-pat community, google it..Happy hunting.

Post a Reply

00abuse

hendertax55
2/20/2016 10:35 EST

It is not your imagination. The dirt, dog poop, and the non stop garbage being dumped in the street, the ravines, etc. yes there is a flu bug going around but it is winter. It is the same the rest of the year. Lakeside is the most expensive area to live. The benefits do not out weigh the positives unless your income is in excess of 60k a year

Post a Reply

00abuse

bluewater1
2/20/2016 10:43 EST

>> The benefits do not out weigh the positives unless your income is in excess of 60k a year <<
???

Post a Reply

00abuse

tomwins
2/20/2016 11:03 EST

I have no idea where you came up with the 60K number. We just moved here in Sept '15 and for the last six months we've averaged spending the equivalent less than $2,500 USD. That is for two people who are not denying themselves anything we want. We eat more than half our meals out and we buy mostly organic for our in-home meals.
So that means we'll be spending about $30,000 a year to live Lakeside. We have many friends who spend far less than we do so they will be spending even less than we do annually.
I'm sure we could live on less in other areas and we could even live on less here. But money is not the only reason to chose where to live. We moved from the U.S. for a better life, not simply to live cheaper. People need to decide the life they want and find the best place to make that life come into reality.
For us, the proximity to GDL airport, world leading medical care, year-round moderate climate, and access to quality food are some major reasons we chose to move here. The experience has surpassed our hopes.

Post a Reply

00abuse

tsblackmore
2/20/2016 11:16 EST

"Lakeside is the most expensive area to live."
Compared to what? SMA? Cabo? Mazatlan? Mérida?

Post a Reply

00abuse

Crochetcrone
2/20/2016 11:24 EST

This info about expense is the central piece in our choice to move to Lakeside. We only get $1800.00 a month for 2 seniors. I have to eat mostly organic and take costly supplements for health reasons.

We will have about $110,000 tops to buy but want to rent first.

We like sports and crafts, but do not go out to movies, theatre etc. we have a quiet simple life. We do want high speed internet, English speaking TV (netflicks), and the use of our smart phones. We might want to eat out several times a week. We want to grow a little garden.

Can we live on $1800.00 with some meds, my need for chiropractic monthly, my nutritional requirements?

It sounds like we would enjoy some of the daytime activities with other people, like music, lunches, classes, sports. And we will want to buy a small car, too, for marketing and dr visits in Guadlajara.

Can we do it on our budget??

Not yet versed at converting pesos to US dollar.

Post a Reply

00abuse

kittvincent
2/20/2016 11:27 EST

Merida will not work for Crochetcrone. It has too much humidity. I spoke to a friend of mine last night with COPD and he said that it is the temperate weather that helps him. I live on a lot less than the numbers being mentioned but I own my home so I don't have to budget in rent. I do what I want and go out frequently. I can still save money each month and have plans to do some travel. Kitt Vincent

Post a Reply

00abuse

dungeondevil
2/20/2016 13:33 EST

Re: hendertax55. You are incorrect. Ilf you live frugally and not in the main core 60k is overkill. And try living in Sur Baha. It is much more expensive than Lake Chapala

Post a Reply

00abuse

dungeondevil
2/20/2016 13:41 EST

I suggest you come for a visit, FIRST. Some of your meds may NOT be available and have to be imported. This MUST be verified. If that $1800 is fixed you have no room for inflation that affects every region of the world, you may be in trouble in the future.So come on down check it to, but do the math.

Post a Reply

00abuse

anitamaria
2/20/2016 13:52 EST

Hello. My daughter she lives in California and she and whole family was very sick for a whole week.
She also took antibiotics.
It gets carried with people who travel from place to place.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Crochetcrone
2/20/2016 21:20 EST

Thanks Kitt for talking to a COPD friend! Yes, need low humidity and temperate climate. Does your friend not suffer from the local burning, Kitt? Trash, dogs, dust doesn't bother me. From youtube, the area looks like a luxury resort for the most part. ??

Very eager to meet the Lakeside crowd! Just worried about buying in our range since The area has become so popular. Oh, and I would love to do a little traveling too!!

Post a Reply

00abuse

Healer
12/11/2016 11:09 EST

thanks for your post. My sister and I are planning to retire in Mexico. she has environmental sensitivities to a disabling degree. I guess we can rule out Chapala. good luck to you. I'd be interested in where you choose to go if that becomes your solution.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Healer
12/11/2016 11:11 EST

My sister and I are considering locations in Mexico for retirement. She has Multiple Chemical Sensitivities so needs clean air, no burning and Organic Food. I hope you will keep us posted about your decisions and what you hear about other areas.

Post a Reply

00abuse

RVGRINGO

From: Mexico
12/11/2016 16:53 EST

No need to rule it out, as it was a viral respiratory infection going around in February. Yes, Ajijic does get a bit of smoke when the milpas are burned, but that is brief. On either side, Jocotopec or Chapala, there is seldom smoke, as there are fewer milpas above Jocotopec and none above Chapala. We lived for years in Ajijic and in Chapala & I have COPD, so was quite aware of the difference.

Note the dates of the posts to which you respond......:)

Post a Reply

00abuse

jaym
12/22/2016 18:07 EST

Please note before jumping to conclusions and making life-changing decisions based on a couple of posts on social media; many of these people are hypochondriacs and nutcases.

Post a Reply

01abuse

Rodrigo1974
12/26/2016 09:15 EST

I live and work in mexico city. no emission control on all of the cars and surrounded by mountains. every time I sit in my bed at night, I have this unproductive cough. the doctor gave me this powder to put in my nose and it helps. if you have the resources, try la paz or cabo san lucas in baja California sur.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Retiree2
12/26/2016 09:47 EST

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=es&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=es&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.animalpolitico.com%2F2016%2F06%2F10-datos-sobre-la-nueva-norma-de-semarnat-para-la-verificacion-vehicular%2F&edit-text=&act=url

Lots of emission control systems on vehicles in Mexico.

Post a Reply

01abuse

AndreasMontoya
10/4/2018 13:49 EST

It's not just smoke, the University of Guadalajara did a study of a village on the lake, all of them showed pesticides and glyphosate, the carcinogen found in Roundup Weed Killer in the urine of the people and determined that they were airborne as the lake evaporates. It was across the board and not realted to working agriculture, a 2 year old girl showed the same amounts as a fifty year old man. The lake s fed by the Lerma River into which almost nine thousand factories dump their toxic waste into it before it empties into Lake Chapala.

Post a Reply

00abuse

CLK32
10/5/2018 08:03 EST

Lake Chapala is highly polluted

https://www.globalnature.org/35127/Living-Lakes/America/Lake-Chapala/resindex.aspx

Post a Reply

00abuse

TexasTransplant
10/8/2018 11:24 EST

Did you notice the link you posted about the pollution in Lake Chapala was from 2004. It is greatly improved in 2018.

Post a Reply

10abuse

nelsonokelmgmailcom
10/8/2018 12:20 EST

TT PLEASE SUPPLY YOUR DATA SOURCE!!!

Post a Reply

00abuse

nelsonokelmgmailcom
10/8/2018 12:20 EST

TT PLEASE SUPPLY YOUR DATA SOURCE!!!

Post a Reply

00abuse

TexasTransplant
10/8/2018 16:41 EST

Here is the latest I read about the state of the lake:
https://www.focusonmexico.com/lake-chapala-state-lake-2018-2/

Post a Reply

00abuse

longtimelurker
10/8/2018 16:42 EST

Really TT?

The sphincter of Central Mexico is in Ibarra. That is where the Lerma spews its filthy mess into what is Lake Chapala. The lake is the largest cesspool in North America. Do you think that all those hundreds of poor towns in the Lerma watershed have state of the art sewage treatment? Or those farms prevent fecal and fertilizer runoff?

You do know where we live, don’t you?

It doesn’t matter if the lake is contaiminated or not. Old retiree’s are not living there for water activities like boating or fishing. They live there because people like to live with others just like them.

Chapala, which Ajijic is a part of, is full of 60 – 80 year olds, where one can share their medical miseries of growing old or for the healthy, the daily exercise is raising that wine/shot/beer glass up to their lips. It’s for the “let’s do lunch” crowd who are asleep by 9pm.
The lake is nothing but a “pretty picture”, just something to look at. And the weather is mostly good.

Post a Reply

00abuse

RGBIII
10/8/2018 21:18 EST

Excellent characterization from Longtimelurker. Absolutely spot on. I am so happy not to be a part of it. And if you know anything about the infrastructure of this immediate area, or the lack of it, you know that beautiful Lake Chapala, will be a very large toilet bowl for many, many years to come. Pollution comes in many forms, And Mexico is guilty on all counts. Nothing is sacred, respected, or protected in this country. Regarding concerns about COPD, remember Lake Chapala sits at one mile in elevation. And we are within forty minutes of the second largest city in Mexico, with major air polution. The mountains serve as a a barrier from most of the pollution. In the spring however, Chapala, and much of Mexico, practices an annual tradition of burning the fields, and simple random burning of brush. It does indeed create pollution issues around Lake Chapala. And every month of the year, even during the rainy season, there is a fine grit/dust, silica, that is prevalent , especially along the roads and highways in the area. When you drive, or especially bike, around sunrise, you can see the blanket of silica that is just hanging over the roads and highways. That will explain why many bikers that you see will be wearing a masks over their face and nose to protect against the fine dust and silica. And without saying, that fine dust makes its way into your homes and businesses. The weather around Lake Chapala, is as close to perfect as you will ever find. But that is all that is perfect about this area.

Post a Reply

00abuse

JasmineinNM
10/8/2018 23:34 EST

Well, I lived in Ajijic for almost three years. My coughing and congestion got worse and worse. I was choked up all the time. It got so that when I tried to talk I would cough. There is a lot of mold there. The house and apartments have not heat and they are damp and cold. I was cold all the time at night except for the months of April and May but when rainy season started in June/July I would get cold as soon as the sun went down because the house was always damp. I kept those water absorbent bags all around the house and they would fill up with water in a couple of months. I got very worried about my health so I moved to the area of McAllen Texas back in the states. Since arriving here my symptoms have really gotten better. My breathing is easier but it wasn't when I first got here. ..due to the low elevation, high humidity and very high temperatures...It felt like a blast furnace outside when trying to breathe but over a couple of months I felt better. I like it here but not as much as I did in Ajijic. I had a wonderful social network of friends and things to do, I want to return but I am concerned about my health there. I miss Ajijic. You can't use my experience to judge your own as it may not be your own. I wish I had better lungs.....maybe you do. Go and judge for yourself.

Post a Reply

00abuse

TexasTransplant
10/9/2018 00:45 EST

I appear to have stirred emotions about Lake Chapala and negative feelings about those who live here with my first posting on this board. A little discouraging, to be sure. I usually spend my time interacting with people in person rather than on message boards with people I will never meet. My apologies for causing anyone to feel they need to lash out at my posting. Interestingly enough, my health has drastically improved since moving here, and I don't regret my move. I guess we are all different...

Post a Reply

00abuse

backfull
10/10/2018 16:06 EST

What is most depressing to me, and yet another source of pollution, is the constant procession of vehicles up and down the Carretera, as the aforementioned expats go about the activities Lurker cites. Few options for other forms of transit, be it vehicle routes, cycling, walking, and apparently little will either.

Post a Reply

10abuse

longtimelurker
10/11/2018 08:14 EST

TT, I don't think you stirred negative feelings. I just find that quite a few people who have chosen to sugar coat the realities of living Lakeside. For 40 years there has been an ever evolving kool-aid cocktail mix about life in Chapala.

Unless you live in a fracc, the municipo is a very dirty place.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Shellyclark2002
10/11/2018 08:52 EST

I'm just very curious. I've visited Ajijic several times over the past few years but the last time was 2011. Have things deteriorated so much in the past seven years and if so why do so many of you live there and others continue to flock to the area during the high season? Something must be bringing them back. Not all 60 to 80 year olds content themselves with "raising a glass" for exercise.

Post a Reply

00abuse

backfull
10/11/2018 10:43 EST

As part of the 60-80 demographic who doesn't mind a cerveza or coctel, I would say the characterization is pretty broad, but L Chapala does have that "feel." That said, many of us are active individually and with groups into hiking and activities that require more energetic output.

Post a Reply

00abuse

longtimelurker
10/12/2018 07:46 EST

Shelly, Ajijic is basically the same as when you last visited 7 years ago. As a tourist it looks like a quaint village with plenty of restaurants and shops, pretty cobblestone streets, all on a huge lake surrounded by mountains. Kind of like the land of OZ.

When you live there it is very different. Those roads are full of holes, are bone jarring, damage your cars, and are very narrow. Areas run out of water, internet is slow and unreliable, and the streets are full of dog sh-t. Garbage service is spotty and trash piles up. Bottle rockets are exploding at dawn almost daily. Sidewalks are cracked and broken making the area dangerous to walk as you get older. Mosquitoes, mosquitos, mosquitos. Poor government services, poor CFE reliability, and areas just run out of water during the dry season. I can go on and on.

It is bone chilling cold in December and January (balmy if you come from Alaska or the Yukon), hot and dusty in May and June, and damp and moldy during the rainy season. If you have allergies it can be hard on you with the 12 month growing season.

The area doesn't really grow as much as you might think. Actual numbers are quite small. https://www.citypopulation.de/php/mexico-jalisco.php?adm2id=14030

There are about 6-7k expats living there full time. That is a high concentration, about 10% of the population of the municipo. You don't need Spanish to live there. If each spend $1k a month, that adds up to 7 million USD/month all of it remittance from NOB. That supports all 4-5 steak houses in a small pueblo, Superlake, and all the DR's. Takeaway all the old expats and the town would turn into Mezcala.

There are many other areas in Mexico that are thriving. Place where the weather is good and town is clean.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Shellyclark2002
10/12/2018 09:10 EST

Thank you LTL for that comprehensive “real life” view of Ajijic. But still it seems many continue to go there. What other areas do you recommend based on your comments?

Post a Reply

00abuse

hrlee7804
10/12/2018 11:19 EST

I have spent travel time in Mexico and Belize for years looking for retirement locations. I officially retired a week ago and drove down to San Carlos, Sonora. Best kept secret from this blog site. Guaymas and Hermosillo for shopping, 5 hours from the border and another hour to Tuscon. Real estate prices good. Yes it gets hot in the summer but I come from the desert side of Oregon. Excpats here don't want the secret to get out....Shhhhhh...

Post a Reply

00abuse

hrlee7804
10/12/2018 11:28 EST

Forgot to mention 'no hassle' zone. Google it! Do your temporary or permanent process but US plated cars don't need to be registered. NO TIP to deal with.

Post a Reply

00abuse

hrlee7804
10/12/2018 11:28 EST

Forgot to mention 'no hassle' zone. Google it! Do your temporary or permanent process but US plated cars don't need to be registered. NO TIP to deal with.

Post a Reply

00abuse

longtimelurker
10/14/2018 07:00 EST

Shelly, Mexico is a big country with lots to offer. It all depends what you want?

I wanted the ocean. I adjusted easily to living with the heat, having AC, cenotes and the Caribbean to cool off. I also wanted a economically well to do area, not an area with poor services and lots of poverty.

Others want to live with other people just like them. That makes it easy for you to adjust to a new country. Lakeside and SMA has developed into that gringolandia.
If you speak a little Spanish there are many areas on the central plateau with good weather, economies and good infrastructure. Queretaro, Aguascaliente SLP, and Mexico State come to mind. I like QRoo, Yucatan, Guaymas, and Mazatlan.
If it is shuffle board, Pinochle games, bars playing the music of the 60's & 70's and expensive cans of USA Campbell's chicken noodle soup than Lake Chapala is for you.

Shelly it comes down to what kind of lifestyle you want.

Post a Reply

01abuse

longtimelurker
10/14/2018 07:06 EST

Hrlee, There is no secret. A couple of us on this board suggested you look at San Carlos last month when you asked about Kino.

As a PR you can not drive a foreign plated car. That includes the no hassle zone. Most of my long time friends living in SC do not bother with residency visas since the border is close by and is less restrictive.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Dharmagranny
10/14/2018 10:19 EST

Cynical longtimelurker thinks everyone living in communities along Lake Chapala is on death's door and lives in isolated expat enclaves as though it was Florida (c'mon, guy, shuffleboard?) I'm in my 70s and you couldn't pay me to buy a can of Campbell's soup, when there are fabulous tacos anywhere you go for 10 or 11 pesos each, or you can cook your own great food from outstanding ingredients. Seriously, I don't have any friends who aren't active, alert, and experiencing Mexico to the fullest degree possible.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Shellyclark2002
10/14/2018 13:22 EST

Thank you LTL for your response. Having done lots of traveling and having lived in Europe for a few years I know really defining what it is you are looking for is the hardest yet most important element in moving to any new place.

Post a Reply

00abuse

YellowTail
10/14/2018 14:48 EST

The original theme of this thread was pollution. We live about an hour's drive from Mexico City (depending) at an elevation of around 6,000 ft. By far - Popo (the volcano) contributes more pollution in the form of ash than does Mexico City. Ya know - to be honest I don't find the pollution in Mexico City so unbearable anymore. Yes - a couple times during the year we have to close the house up if there are agricultural burns and the wind is blowing our way. We live in a city which sits in a basin, but we live high up on the side of the bowl and the air moves well. It's like when we lived in South Florida and everyone complained about the heat/humidity. We lived about 1/2 mile from the ocean and had a good breeze from the east. A good part of the time we slept with the a/c off, windows open and the ceiling fans going.

LTL - one of my favorite places on earth is about 10 kms north of Tulum, south of Akumal. It is called Tankah Bay.

Post a Reply

00abuse

RGBIII
10/14/2018 15:28 EST

I much prefer the realistic characterizations by LTL regarding Lakeside, Ajijic, and the general area, to fluff. Some of the respondents to this post seem to have been offended by certain statements. If this post serve as motivating element and forces some people to examine their misguided and unrealistic views of Ajijic, all for the better. When the Snowbirds return each October, their presence turns Ajijic into one big traffic jam. No matter what you want to do, wherever you go, their is a line. For some of us, this is home. Not an amusement park, where we come for a few months and then leave. Even during the low season, their simply is no infra structure to support the combines local and Ex-Pat communities in Ajjic. Yet, the local government continues to approve and allow more and more expansion. If you really care about this area, and are informed as to what is going on around you, you should be concerned and alarmed. I much appreciate the people who paint an accurate picture of life in Ajijic, , vs. the sleepy little village of some twenty years ago. Time to wake up and become aware of what is going on all around you.

Post a Reply

00abuse

longtimelurker
10/15/2018 17:07 EST

Yellowtail, I was just at a friends house on Tankah. TS Michael cleared out all the sargasso and the beach and water was clean and beautiful.

D-granny, Nothing wrong with being old. Ajijic is the exact same kind of retirement area as Florida, only with tacos.
Here is this nice fluff video'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lYA7c1Pnuo

All retired people want to live there, And why not?

Post a Reply

00abuse

AndreasMontoya
10/16/2018 12:26 EST

Crochetcrone, burning and smoke are the least of the problems of this lake. The University of Guadalajara did a study on why children living on the lake were dying and determined that pesticides and glyphosate, the carcinogen in Roundup weed killer evaporate from the lake and become airborne and are breathed in by the public. The children have birth defects, neurological damage and kidney failure. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-health-village/murky-business-a-hunt-for-answers-as-children-fall-sick-around-mexico-lake-idUSKBN1DY11E

Post a Reply

00abuse

peabody
10/16/2018 17:03 EST

hrlee7804, can you tell me what there is to do in San Carlos? I would not be driving there like you, so I would be interested in things relatively close.

Post a Reply

00abuse

hrlee7804
10/18/2018 04:32 EST

Google 'whatsupssncarlos'. Great water, great desert, low real estate prices, two marinas, hundreds of boats up to 140', golf course/green, country club, dive shops, horse rentals. ATV rentals, tons of restaurants/bars/ music, extremely clean for a Mexican town. 10 conveniece stores, specialty shops with Art Studio wine club and Deportivo Club. Guaymas, 6 miles away, has Sam's club, Walmart and Home Depot. Hermosillo 60 miles away has international airport no major storms hit here because they get broken up over The Baja....Bad is hot in summer. A Tuscon friend with a condo here goes back to Tuscon in the summer because of the favorable weather.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Expatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Mexico.

Mail Forwarding to Mexico

Mail Forwarding to Mexico.


Expat Tax

Expat Tax Preparation, Expat Tax Professionals


International Moving Companies

Moving to Mexico? Find a moving company.

Join Today (free)

Join Expat Exchange to meet expats in your area or get advice before your move. It's FREE and takes 1 minute!

Copyright 1997-2018 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal