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Advice, pointers for retiring in Peru.

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eybaba7200
5/19/2020 13:08 EST

Hi everyone , We have started researching to figure out what’s the best place for us to retire. So far with no serious health concern :) I have only been to Lima twice.
I have been thinking about Arequipa and Trujillo. ( If you have any suggestions for other places i'd love to hear that)
A bit about me :I am Canadian. I speak Spanish. Engineer/ musician. I’ve travelled to 8-10 countries in America’s. My wife is Colombian.
Looking for a place not expensive for a good quality of life. Not expensive.
I am not much into western way of life so losing a bit of a luxury doesn’t bother me. I am coming from a very poor and humble background and have been raised in rough places in other countries so the crime and insecurity as long as it’s not to the point of nightmare doesn’t bug me much. Also I’d like to know how bad are taxes in Peru. Do expats pay income taxes for their pensions Or income coming from overseas ? Is it possible to obtain residency in Peru without investing ? ( I might buy a humble house there ). I won’t be commuting to Canada much so that won’t be an option. How is the healthcare situation? Is private healthcare very expensive? How do you rate your happiness level there compared to your home country? How difficult is banking there? are commissions and transfers eating a chunk of the money coming in? I know there’s much to consider but any pointers and info from you guys who live there and experience things first hand is super valuable. Thank you so much :)

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Johndittemore
5/20/2020 13:26 EST

No need to worry on Living in Peru. I lived in Lima for my first 8 years of life and have gone back at least 50 times. Trujillo would not be my first choice. I’m just more bias on Lima. Arequipa is a more relaxed place to live. If you can adjust to altitude lots of people are moving to Cusco. You. Do need to worry about paying any taxes on your funds. I do not know how strong Peru is on enforcement but as long as you have an income of around $25,000. There is no problem in residing in Peru. Since you are at the retirement age medical care is essential. There are many excellent USA trained Doctor with the most up to date equipment. I will post you later on more info. Forgot that I have an appointment.

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Johndittemore
5/20/2020 13:26 EST

No need to worry on Living in Peru. I lived in Lima for my first 8 years of life and have gone back at least 50 times. Trujillo would not be my first choice. I’m just more bias on Lima. Arequipa is a more relaxed place to live. If you can adjust to altitude lots of people are moving to Cusco. You. Do need to worry about paying any taxes on your funds. I do not know how strong Peru is on enforcement but as long as you have an income of around $25,000. There is no problem in residing in Peru. Since you are at the retirement age medical care is essential. There are many excellent USA trained Doctor with the most up to date equipment. I will post you later on more info. Forgot that I have an appointment.

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eybaba7200
5/20/2020 13:30 EST

Thanks so much. I’ll stay in tuned. Wow it’s like Colombia then when it comes to tax. Can one go by without opening a Peruvian bank account and just use atm ?

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Johndittemore
5/20/2020 15:19 EST

I will continue, residency is not difficult. I just found out that last year to live in Peru required an income of $1500.00 per month plus $500.00 a month per each dependent. Since you are Canadian check with the consulate of Peru in Canada. There are some many different opinions on the same subject matter. Since you enjoy a different lifestyle than mine I cannot actually give you anything but an educated guess but I would say that with rental and all the other necessities it might cost around $1800.00 a month to live in a nice style. Like myself and my way of living it would be almost double. Of course two factors fit in. Living in Lima brings a higher cost than any other city in Peru. If you enjoy a quieter life style then Lima is not the answer. .Good insurance is available for most populated cities. Make sure it is private health insurance. They have companies like Cigna located in Peru. One place, though remote, is the City of Oxapampa. It is a well established community. It’s very German oriented. The homes are like you would find in old Germany . If you like warm climate throughout the year try Piura. Costal town with sunshine all year. If anymore is needed just ask. I might not be able to accurately give you an 100% answer but can guide you to it. I myself plan to move to Lima and enjoy my life away from the Politics that seems to always effect our lives. Lots of people claim that Peru is expensive. It is if you live the life of a gringo with his leased car, his 75”TV with incredible sound machine, his $1000 Smart phone and so on. For me and my lifestyle I can live 30 to 40 % cheaper in Lima compared to Miami.

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Johndittemore
5/20/2020 15:19 EST

I will continue, residency is not difficult. I just found out that last year to live in Peru required an income of $1500.00 per month plus $500.00 a month per each dependent. Since you are Canadian check with the consulate of Peru in Canada. There are some many different opinions on the same subject matter. Since you enjoy a different lifestyle than mine I cannot actually give you anything but an educated guess but I would say that with rental and all the other necessities it might cost around $1800.00 a month to live in a nice style. Like myself and my way of living it would be almost double. Of course two factors fit in. Living in Lima brings a higher cost than any other city in Peru. If you enjoy a quieter life style then Lima is not the answer. .Good insurance is available for most populated cities. Make sure it is private health insurance. They have companies like Cigna located in Peru. One place, though remote, is the City of Oxapampa. It is a well established community. It’s very German oriented. The homes are like you would find in old Germany . If you like warm climate throughout the year try Piura. Costal town with sunshine all year. If anymore is needed just ask. I might not be able to accurately give you an 100% answer but can guide you to it. I myself plan to move to Lima and enjoy my life away from the Politics that seems to always effect our lives. Lots of people claim that Peru is expensive. It is if you live the life of a gringo with his leased car, his 75”TV with incredible sound machine, his $1000 Smart phone and so on. For me and my lifestyle I can live 30 to 40 % cheaper in Lima compared to Miami.

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Need health insurance in Peru? William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite).

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eybaba7200
5/20/2020 16:28 EST

Fantastic info. I appreciate it. I take all those into account. I’ll probably lean more towards Arequipa or pirua. I used to go out with 2 peruanas a few years ago but in Lima.
Cheers.

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rianmi
5/20/2020 16:31 EST

This is one of the most comprehensive and sensible response I have read. Thank you. I am currently in Lima. I have been here since March 16. I come every year and I’m also thinking of relocating by May next. My circumstances are also a bit different as I may continue living in my spouse family home. I however have a friend who moved about 3 years ago. He was living in San Borja where I am but last year moved to Lince right on the border with San Isidro. He has a beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath apt and is paying $800.
He does not have insurance but sees doctors and specialists as needed plus checkups as he has medical conditions. He is so far quite happy with that.
I did not know that the monthly requirement is now gone from $1000 monthly to $1500.
If you are doing your cooking it is very reasonable but eating out a lot like I do can be expensive.
I find Peruvians in generally very friendly and easy to get along with even though my Spanish to say is limited is an understatement.

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Johndittemore
5/20/2020 20:06 EST

Lucky you in Lima. I usually go around late December or at least sometime during the summer months. I have a friend that lives in San Antonio/Miraflores that I stay with. I hardly stay in Lima, he has a beach home 90 kilometers south of Lima at a place called La Caleta Bujama. A good point might be if you call your embassy in Lima and ask them all the necessary question you have. If I recall from many years ago the Canadian Embassy was in Miraflores. You have the same situation I had a few years back when I would stay at my Spouse family home. When her mother passed the residence was way too big for her Dad so we sold the place and had to find her dad a care home. Yes eating out can be expensive. I can pay 45 soles for a Lomo Saltado but get one with the same quality for 25 soles at another place. I can understand that your friend has no private insurance. As a citizen Health Insurance is considered free. When I told you $1500.00 a months I should have stated that it included general items such as electric and water, cable with internet, cell phone, if renting in an apartment also maintenance fees. You just have to be wise and take it slowly. Just one thing to keep in mind if you decide to purchase. The interior of a home does not have to be pristine. With Electrical/plumbing /carpentry being so cheap in Lima to remodel. Enjoy Lima because for myself there is no better way of living anywhere.

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Johndittemore
5/20/2020 20:06 EST

Lucky you in Lima. I usually go around late December or at least sometime during the summer months. I have a friend that lives in San Antonio/Miraflores that I stay with. I hardly stay in Lima, he has a beach home 90 kilometers south of Lima at a place called La Caleta Bujama. A good point might be if you call your embassy in Lima and ask them all the necessary question you have. If I recall from many years ago the Canadian Embassy was in Miraflores. You have the same situation I had a few years back when I would stay at my Spouse family home. When her mother passed the residence was way too big for her Dad so we sold the place and had to find her dad a care home. Yes eating out can be expensive. I can pay 45 soles for a Lomo Saltado but get one with the same quality for 25 soles at another place. I can understand that your friend has no private insurance. As a citizen Health Insurance is considered free. When I told you $1500.00 a months I should have stated that it included general items such as electric and water, cable with internet, cell phone, if renting in an apartment also maintenance fees. You just have to be wise and take it slowly. Just one thing to keep in mind if you decide to purchase. The interior of a home does not have to be pristine. With Electrical/plumbing /carpentry being so cheap in Lima to remodel. Enjoy Lima because for myself there is no better way of living anywhere.

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Johndittemore
5/21/2020 16:52 EST

Banking is more strict in Lima than North America. You can utilize your banking system in Canada and with A debit card draw money from countless of facilities in Lima or other major cities. You can go to Grocery Markets like Wong-Vivanda and withdraw money. It’s no different than North America where you find ATM machines every few feet. You can also open up a dollar account in Lima banks. I have a friend that worked for the UN and was paid in Canadian Money and it was transferred to the banking system in Lima.

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Johndittemore
5/21/2020 16:52 EST

Banking is more strict in Lima than North America. You can utilize your banking system in Canada and with A debit card draw money from countless of facilities in Lima or other major cities. You can go to Grocery Markets like Wong-Vivanda and withdraw money. It’s no different than North America where you find ATM machines every few feet. You can also open up a dollar account in Lima banks. I have a friend that worked for the UN and was paid in Canadian Money and it was transferred to the banking system in Lima.

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Johndittemore
5/21/2020 16:56 EST

I was just reading my message from yesterday and did not proof read it before I sent it. There is no need to worry about paying taxes on your retirement funds. As long as you live on those funds and do not go into any monetary venture in Peru you are free of taxes.

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Johndittemore
5/21/2020 16:56 EST

I was just reading my message from yesterday and did not proof read it before I sent it. There is no need to worry about paying taxes on your retirement funds. As long as you live on those funds and do not go into any monetary venture in Peru you are free of taxes.

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rianmi
5/21/2020 17:30 EST

Thank you for clarifying that. I was wondering about that and was going to check on it.

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eybaba7200
5/21/2020 17:54 EST

Thanks everyone for all the valuable information Is anyone living in Arequipa or has lived there before ?
I know there are these little spots 1-2 hours south of Lima that are like local holiday spots with nice facilities but think they are dead during the week or might get too boring to live there.
Any thoughts ?

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Johndittemore
5/21/2020 22:04 EST

One or two hours south of Lima are filled with Beach homes. Little over an hour away is a resort plus private beach homes in a place called Asia. My friends beach house is 5 kilometers before Asia in a place called Bujama. When you leave Lima and head south it is mile after mile of beach houses. Asia is like the center for activities. It has a large shopping center with two super markets, restaurants,nightclubs, a good clinic etc. The peak activities are in Lima summer which is mid December until March. I have friends that go for three months.

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Johndittemore
5/21/2020 22:04 EST

One or two hours south of Lima are filled with Beach homes. Little over an hour away is a resort plus private beach homes in a place called Asia. My friends beach house is 5 kilometers before Asia in a place called Bujama. When you leave Lima and head south it is mile after mile of beach houses. Asia is like the center for activities. It has a large shopping center with two super markets, restaurants,nightclubs, a good clinic etc. The peak activities are in Lima summer which is mid December until March. I have friends that go for three months.

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2fitogzr
6/1/2020 10:56 EST

Bear in mind Arequipa is an extremely dusty,gritty place.Watch some of the videos from westerners who moved there.Everyday is a new layer of sand and grit to collect off your furniture,floors,tables;not just outside on your patio.
I visited there a couple of times;very high altitude,beautiful central plaza, way more affordable than Lima. The people in Lima laughed at my interest in Arequipa; they reminded me it is the land of terramotos (earthquakes)

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2fitogzr
6/1/2020 11:19 EST

One caution; if you look uo aur pollution levels; Lima ranks right up there with the higher levels.There are cities in China and India with worse pollutant levels/particulate emissions but as for comparison with other major cities in the Americas; New York, LA, Dallas,Toronto,Mexico City,Caracas,Rio,Quito, Lima is almost twice their levels. The only city in South America that approaches Lima's pollution is it's southerly neighbor,
Santiago,Chile which I visited 3 years ago. That and the constant traffic gridlock has kept my retirement to Lima on ice. I have sat in Lima taxi cabs 90 minutes to travel 10 blocks; walking in the pollution is no better for you. After thus pandemic,I could move there but would wear a mask all the time;hopefully the locals and visitors would do the same,thus removing the stigma of mask-wearing in the post-pandemic era.

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Johndittemore
6/2/2020 21:55 EST

Compared to a few years ago the level of pollution has improved greatly in Lima. The traffic in Lima requires that you get use to it. There has been many times that leaving Miraflores to get to the Pan Am Highway South took the same amount of time to get to Bujama , Kilometer 89.9, once entering the highway. It’s a way of life. If pollution is a factor then just take a 45 minute trip to La Molina where the sun shines all year round and the pollution is minimal. Chosica and the surrounding areas are nice. Correct about Arequipa. I don’t think there is any place in Peru that does not have

drawbacks but all those are forgotten once you see the culture and way of life.

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PFleetwood
10/7/2020 15:46 EST

Interesting!
Id like to get more info about Peru retirement.

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Johndittemore
10/7/2020 16:05 EST

What kind of pointers are you looking for? Just like any country Peru has its up’s and downs. If you are adventurous Peru has more to offer when it comes to adventures.

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Orion95
12/1/2020 21:26 EST

I'd like to see more from Peruvian expats. Wonder if they are going somewhere else. Planning trip to S.A. next year (fingers crossed).

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quietbibleguy
1/31/2021 17:03 EST

Johndittemore, thanks so much for all the wonderful information! Your description of Oxapampa intrigued me a lot. I looked it up, and it looks like my kind of place. Only, I started to dig a little deeper, and it says that the Shining Path was operating in that area earlier?
Sorry if I am asking a hard question, but may I please ask how things are with Shining Path and the other terrorist groups? Are they on the increase after Covid? Or on the decrease?
I have lived in a few different places in Latin America, for maybe four years total. My Spanish isn't too bad (unless it is Chileans talking at full speed). I am not into luxury living, I just like a nice quiet place in the countryside with internet. Is there any way I could find out more?
Thanks so much for the tremendously helpful thread!

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Johndittemore
1/31/2021 22:02 EST

On the Shinning Path. Yes they do exist but in such a weak manner. Last word was that it had a little over 300 members left, a far cry from past years. To be honest have not heard anything about any sort of operation in the Oxapampa area. Geographically Oxpa. Is in a great area with so many side trips available. It has a unique culture and the food is a pleasure to consume. If you want to see a tremendous program of Peru there is a series that you can get on YouTube called reportaje de Peru. It has dozens of programs of one mans quest to visit all places in Peru. You will find it interesting.

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elgringuito
2/1/2021 10:22 EST

Thank you very much. I hope to check it out.

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