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Margarita

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pinguino03
6/22/2013 18:49 EST

Hi everyone, My family and I are considering moving to Margarita in the near future. We lived in Estado Bolivar before but have been in Costa Rica for the last 7 years. Now as things are getting very expensive here we are reconsidering Venezuela. Here are some questions: is there a lot of crime in Margarita? 2. Are there shortages of food etc on a regular basis? 3. Is the overall atmosphere tense? 4. How good is the private hospital Centro Medico La Fe? 5. I am an English teacher, do you think it would be likely that I could find work? I would be willing to open my own school if people were interested. 6. What does food cost? 7. are there lots of electricity outages? 8. Are people staying put or are they running away? Thanks so much for your help!

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JohnSchiller
1/17/2018 13:11 EST

Anyone living in Margarita

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sandrroy
1/22/2018 13:58 EST

NOW is NOT the time to come to Margarita!!!!!!

I have been here 11 years and it's never been worse!!!! Barely any protein, No antibiotics!! Kids eating out of the garbage trucks in front of the panaderia in front of my building in Porlamar. Prices are Stateside prices and they are changing weekly if not more often. 2 months ago sardine fillets cost 1,500Bs today they are 20-30,000Bs!!! T.P. is again not on the shelves! Flights to and from Margarita from the mainland are like hen's teeth, Planes in disrepair and parts not available. Car parts; tires, brakes, oil, and sometimes gasoline are in short supply if available at all!! Pet food costs an arm and a leg so don't bring pets!! Vets have no meds for animals either! Jugs of water went from 200 to 20,000 for a refill of reverse osmosis pure water, oh ya want to regular water, that'll cost you a bit more!!

you wanted to know, now ya do!!

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johncare
8/4/2018 09:06 EST

i be arriving this month staying on beach close Airport

checking out possible retirement locations

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pvrich
8/4/2018 11:15 EST

Hey there, I am so looking forward to hearing about your trip as I am planning on coming there,too. It will be good to hear from someone on the ground there. Thanks so much for posting this. PVRICH

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sandrroy
8/6/2018 12:42 EST

It's only gotten worse since I last wrote!!

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johncare
8/6/2018 14:03 EST

thanks for heads up.. i be in VE in a few weeks

Catia La Mar, Vargas 1162
apartment in a block has guards and cafe restaurant..
advided 2 take low denomination usd and bringing own medication

what u write its same in philippines I just fly out

staying by sea beach near airport should i decide exit 2 Columbia Panama !!!

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purpledawn
8/9/2018 00:31 EST

Hi, I am also thinking of coming to Margarita, for a week to a month or more if it pans out - a few more questions if I may:
-- you've written proteins are hard to get, but I'm vegetarian: how hard is it to get vegetable s & fruit food in market or restaurants?
-- how is the internet access via mobile 4G in margarita; i.e, speed, availability, cost, does it go down when the electricity goes out
-- how bad are the electricity cuts, ie on a day on average how many hours is it out, and is there a pattern, ie, during the morning, afternoon, evening, night, late night/early morning...
-- how bad is security in porlamar area or other areas, can you go out to eat in the early evening / night? can you go swimming, walking the day?
-- I understand most transaction these days use a (debit?) card due to lack of cash; how can you get this card as a foreigner? How do you go about exchanging us dollars and putting it onto the card, in a low trust (black market) exchange, assuming the other party doesn't have the requisite cash? Or do most black market exchangers have enough cash?

Thank you!

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sandrroy
8/13/2018 11:16 EST

THINK AGAIN!! This is NOT a good time to be coming with the gov't changing the actual money system with new money. No one knows what's going to happen next!!

Fruits and veggies are available!

One never gets a warning when the power is going to go out and it can be anywhere from a few minutes to many hours and forget 4G and internet access when the power is off! The actual speed is the slowest on the planet!! and there is no warning when it's going off!

Porlamar is as secure as anywhere on the island but I don't cross the street after dark. During the day I walk everywhere and I haven't been mugged in several years BUT I have been accosted more than a couple of times in broad daylight and have been with others who've had their necklaces stolen off their necks in daylight hours! (nothing fancy but sentimental)

I have no idea how one would buy things without local debit cards and you cannot open a bank acct to get a debit card because you're not a RESIDENT! and with the changing of money NO ONE has enough cash except for gov't money changers AND DO NOT CHANGE MONEY ON THE STREET OR WITH STRANGERS!!!! If you use a US credit card the rate of exchange is almost nothing compared to the black market rates and they charge 17% in addition to the charge amount!

I cannot say it strongly enough that NOW is NOT a good time to come to Venezuela!!

wait for another year!!!

good luck!

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sandrroy
8/13/2018 11:17 EST

THINK AGAIN!! This is NOT a good time to be coming with the gov't changing the actual money system with new money. No one knows what's going to happen next!!

Fruits and veggies are available!

One never gets a warning when the power is going to go out and it can be anywhere from a few minutes to many hours and forget 4G and internet access when the power is off! The actual speed is the slowest on the planet!! and there is no warning when it's going off!

Porlamar is as secure as anywhere on the island but I don't cross the street after dark. During the day I walk everywhere and I haven't been mugged in several years BUT I have been accosted more than a couple of times in broad daylight and have been with others who've had their necklaces stolen off their necks in daylight hours! (nothing fancy but sentimental)

I have no idea how one would buy things without local debit cards and you cannot open a bank acct to get a debit card because you're not a RESIDENT! and with the changing of money NO ONE has enough cash except for gov't money changers AND DO NOT CHANGE MONEY ON THE STREET OR WITH STRANGERS!!!! If you use a US credit card the rate of exchange is almost nothing compared to the black market rates and they charge 17% in addition to the charge amount!

I cannot say it strongly enough that NOW is NOT a good time to come to Venezuela!!

wait for another year!!!

good luck!

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arubio
3/18/2019 04:47 EST

Sandrroy, you are disgusted with Venezuela, and you stay for 11 years? The Country has all problerms coming from international sanctions, but what you say is really fake news. There is plenty of world out of Porlamar, you honbly habve to choose. Gasoline is in short supply? Why don't you say that you fill your tank with USD 0,06? Why don't you say you pay less that 5 USD/month for electricity, gas, water in your house? Tell us how much you need to live there,,,

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sandrroy
3/21/2019 15:36 EST

The news I give is NOT FAKE NEWS! Just because it is cheap to live here doesn't mean there are no problems, when there are power outages, when the internet is the slowest on the continent, IF you can stay connected which is problematic for days at a time, when there is no water for days, I have not had phone service in my apt for over a year but they still send me bills, when I cannot find medicine to help me breath the beautiful Caribbean sea air. I don't own a car because there are no parts like brakes, batteries, oil, parts for the AC and the good mechanics are either overworked or they've left the country. I take public transport and have to walk 5 blocks to the nearest stop because the route that used to run in front of my building was eliminated because there isn't enough gasoline to continue the route.

Try getting parts for the 2 elevators we have...they aren't available so when both elevators are out of commission like they have been frequently in the past year some people have to walk up 13 flights of stairs, and we have a pool here but the water is mostly green because there are no pool chemicals available.

I can live here because when I bought my apt in 2005 all I needed was a passport and cash, NOW you cannot buy property unless you have a national ID card or have a local business partner and it takes over a year to get the National ID card.

Prices go up daily at the supermarkets, nothing has a price on the shelf because they are changing so fast. With 2 million% inflation the locals are now living on less than $6 per MONTH.

NONE of this is FAKE news!!

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boutdun
4/24/2019 13:17 EST

my wife and I spent 2 1/2 years around Venezuela on our sailboat, wonderful times and people, problem is; that was in 1991-1993....those days are gone never to return. it is a crime to have turned that country into the tragedy it is today. you could send me there for free, furnish shelter and food and I would not go.....a. the shelter might be less than desired. b. what food?
a truly sad state of affairs. go there at your own risk!

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Retirement-In-PorlamarAn Expat Shares What it's Like Retiring in Porlamar, Venezuela

An expat who is married to a Venezuelan retired to Porlamar on Margarita Island 7 years ago. Despite the political climate, he appreciates the incredibly low cost of living in Venezuela.

An expat who is married to a Venezuelan retired to Porlamar on Margarita Island 7 years ago. Despite the political climate, he appreciates the incredibly low cost of living in Venezuela. ...

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