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terhaary posted Need to rent furnished 1 bedroom near UWI Jan-May 2016 on the Trinidad & Tobago forum on April 21, 2015:
I will be teaching and doing research while on a Fulbright at UWI. I'm interested in a safe place to rent--an apartment, guest house, or house-sitting arrangement. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Is it possible to rent a bike while there, as the cost of a car rental is prohibitive?
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gingerbaby replied to the thread Single Woman moving to POS on the Trinidad & Tobago forum:
buchan79 initially posted:
Hello, I've recently been through the application for a job in Trinidad working in POS. I'm a 35 year old woman and would be moving over single status. Can anyone advise on safety, whether Trinidad is a suitable place for a single girl, ie is there much to do, much of a community or is it more geared towards families? I'm really excited about my next adventure but just not sure it's the right place! Any tips, info, groups would be greatly appreciated :) Thanks
gingerbaby replied on April 14, 2015 with:
Success in life depends on you. It all depends on your profession and your personality in T&T. Trinidad is a very status, class and race (lately it is worst, especially with one upcoming race) country. It depends on where you fit in. In North America, you can survive without anybody and venture to many places alone. Trinidad is a country where you have to move around with a group of people or a friend. You cannot survive being an independent person, you must get a few friends. Yes, they are very family oriented and I find it is hard to get into groups if they have not been your friends since high school or have family connections. It is not a transient society like US or Canada is. Remember it only has a population of about 1.3 million officially but maybe another 300,000 living there. Lots of families who are related. Maybe if it was a tourist island, people would have been different. I will not discourage you because it is my homeland and I think that it is a beautiful place and some parts are no different than living up North. Although I have not lived there for many decades, I still have friends there who are very hospitable to me when I visit. If I did not have friends, I would probably visit Jamaica instead where I find the people are friendlier and more welcoming. If you have a great personality and are prepared to put up with the BS from public establishments with their lackadaisical attitude and rude manner towards you, you will survive. If you keep up with the news, there are lots of events going on all year round to attend. There are also lots of charitable groups working with almost every area in life. When you get there check out a show called The Morning Brew and you will be informed of important current things that you should know on a daily basis. You just have to find your groove and you will be happy. The only way for Trinidad to change is for the government to start educating the children when they are toddlers to be different. I don't think that will happen in my life time. Good luck and enjoy.
gingerbaby replied on April 14, 2015 with:
Success in life depends on you. It all depends on your profession and your personality in T&T. Trinidad is a very status, class and race (lately it is worst, especially with one upcoming race) country. It depends on where you fit in. In North America, you can survive without anybody and venture to many places alone. Trinidad is a country where you have to move around with a group of people or a friend. You cannot survive being an independent person, you must get a few friends. Yes, they are very family oriented and I find it is hard to get into groups if they have not been your friends since high school or have family connections. It is not a transient society like US or Canada is. Remember it only has a population of about 1.3 million officially but maybe another 300,000 living there. Lots of families who are related. Maybe if it was a tourist island, people would have been different. I will not discourage you because it is my homeland and I think that it is a beautiful place and some parts are no different than living up North. Although I have not lived there for many decades, I still have friends there who are very hospitable to me when I visit. If I did not have friends, I would probably visit Jamaica instead where I find the people are friendlier and more welcoming. If you have a great personality and are prepared to put up with the BS from public establishments with their lackadaisical attitude and rude manner towards you, you will survive. If you keep up with the news, there are lots of events going on all year round to attend. There are also lots of charitable groups working with almost every area in life. When you get there check out a show called The Morning Brew and you will be informed of important current things that you should know on a daily basis. You just have to find your groove and you will be happy. The only way for Trinidad to change is for the government to start educating the children when they are toddlers. I don't think that will happen in my life time. Good luck and enjoy.
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Aquablue replied to the thread Banking for non residents on the Trinidad & Tobago forum:
Themariner initially posted:
I have a question: Someone not resident in Trinidad, can he open bank account? I read yes for personal. Can he still receive his salary in it or savings for retirement purpose?
Aquablue replied on April 13, 2015 with:
My husband ( who was born in Trinidad, but is a dual Canadian citizen ) and I have two bank accounts in Trinidad.We don't live there, but wanted to have an a/c there. We opened the first a/c with my Father in law, a national. We also needed a letter from our bank manager in Canada as well as all my husbands Trinidad ID as well as our Canadian ID. This a/c requires 2 signatures to withdraw $/write cheques, and cannot be linked to a Debit Card. We opened up another a/c the next year, which was much easier and have bank cards to use. As stated before, there is no link-ups with other Canadian banks, you need to wire money into the T&T a/c ( you will need bank swift codes and phone numbers/addresses, contacts to do so ).
gingerbaby replied on March 14, 2015 with:
I was recently in Trinidad and live in Canada and deal with RBC. I was able to withdraw money (T&T) from the ATM, I used RBC, but they could not access my account if I wanted to do anything else. They don't have that access. So if I went to T&T for a few months, I can get my money because it is deposited in Canada. Of course, I was only allowed to withdraw $3,000 TT from my account a day but that depends on your local bank's allowance for withdrawals. I don't think that they would just allow me to open an account although I was born in T&T but I do not have dual citizenship. Years ago I was told that I would have to have a joint account with a local if I wanted to do so, but that was years ago. Of course, I would not do that either.
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Aquablue replied to the thread customs and clearing persona effects on the Trinidad & Tobago forum:
ferguson initially posted:
i recently relocated to trinidad and to my dismay have been waiting forever for my things to be cleared from the ports. this is costing me way too much money. the authorities are so complacent about everything. why is this? what can i do to move to the top of the list?
Aquablue replied on April 13, 2015 with:
Sadly, bribery is the norm in Trinidad. It may not be ideal, but it is the way of life there, that is not going to change any time soon.
ferguson replied on December 01, 2014 with:
FlyboyWV, you got lucky!
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Aquablue replied to the thread Moving to Trinidad from America on the Trinidad & Tobago forum:
angie4408 initially posted:
Hi all. I have just received word that my husband is going to be starting a new job in Trinidad (near one of the two international airports, we are not sure which one yet). He is going to go there in June, and our 10 year old son and I will be joining him anytime from August to December. I have a few questions. First, I am a licensed ESL and Secondary Language Arts teacher. How easy would it be for me to find a teaching job? I can work for my husbands company for awhile but I would like to teach. Also, what are the schools like there (as I mentioned my son is 10)? I have been researching some international schools but I have heard that the private schools there can be good also. Also, my son loves soccer. Do they have soccer clubs for kids there like they do in the United States? I am so uneducated about Trinidad right now that any information would be helpful!
Aquablue replied on April 13, 2015 with:
I know that the Tobago airport is a small airport, but there are direct flights to Tobago from Europe. There must be some kind of customs dept. there to process incoming foreign travellers.
TechRep replied on April 01, 2015 with:
Flyboy I must say that was the most polite description i have ever heard, and will remember it. I have often described their accent as having a Jamaican tone, spoken at the speed of which Spanish is spoken in Mexico. For me, one of the things that made it difficult was the lack of separation between words. Once you get used to it, at least you can keep up.
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property in Trinidad-&-TobagoThis spacious two storey income property is located on 8000 sq ft of land in a very peaceful and safe neighborhood in Tunapuna.
getmeonthewater posted Down "de' Islands Boating and fishing charters on the Trinidad & Tobago forum:
Hi All, welcome to Trinidad ! Living in Trinidad there are few things better than a day at one of our many beaches "down de islands" or ddi as we call it. We offer boat charters for fishing or just relaxing with a full Bar and Food catering service optional. Give us a call to arrange a memorable day for you and your friends and family. Regards 461 5293
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Cornerstone1978 replied to the thread Replacement milk for cow and gate on the Trinidad & Tobago forum:
Varkey initially posted:
Hi I will be moving into Trinidad soon from UK. I am currently bottle feeding my 6 weeks old baby - cow and gate. I was wondering if someone could help me find a replacement milk for cow and gate please. Thank you
Cornerstone1978 replied most recently with:
There are many different options to choose from in Trinidad which are available in all the leading supermarkets as well as in bulk at the various Pricemarts across the country. We used Enfamil. Hope that helps.
Varkey replied most recently with:
It's a brand of bottle milk/ formula/powered milk here in the UK.
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Ledapq replied to the thread Living in Trinidad on the Trinidad & Tobago forum:
Kawshik initially posted:
Hi there, we are a mid 30s, professional couple with a 3 year old daughter and are planning to move to Trinidad next year from the UK. My wife is has a Trini passport and I'm going to apply for my residency when we move. I want to know what it's really like to live and work in Trinidad as I've so far had very conflicting comments and advice. The key things that concern me are: - Crime & Safety - Healthcare - Bureaucracy - Education system - Finding work - Meeting other expats We would be grateful if any one who has made the move and can share their experiences with us, good or bad please. Thanks.
Ledapq replied most recently with:
Hi. I moved with my husband 8 months ago but I got the job before so I can't advise you in that regard. Safety: there is a very specific list of neighborhoods where most expats live. These are very safe areas, security 24/7. You don't need to live in a compound/gated community. We live in a house in a neighborhood in the West and there are security cars driving around all day, every day. I think it is necessary to own a car here, as public transport is scarce and not very reliable. Also, I have been advised to not use it at night. Education system: you can find schools with the US, UK, and Canadian systems. We don't have kids so I can't comment on quality but I have heard good things about it. Healthcare: we have insurance from an international company and have used the doctor only once for a regular flu and found it to be ok. Unless you have a chronic condition, I think healthcare is ok. Bureaucracy is really bad, most people will tell you that to get things done here you need to know someone. Trinidad is all about having a connection in the right place. Either your company will help you sort things out (my case) or you'll have to be very very patient.
gingerbaby replied most recently with:
I think that the best thing for you to do is to go on a vacation and do as much research as you can while you are there. It is impossible for people to answer you online. The results will be conflicting. You will also see the place and really see if that is what you want.
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Expat ArticlesArticle Summary: Expats in Trinidad & Tobago love the family-focused Trinis, the laid-back island culture and the beautiful beaches. That being said, many expats find dealing with bureaucracy a challenge, the pace of life frustrating and the cost of housing, food and cars much higher than expected. (Continue)
gingerbaby replied most recently with:
Most of this article is true. There are some specialty gourmet shops but you have to know where to find them. I found an excellent one on Long Circular Road where I could have purchase most things that I buy here. The West Mall also provides things for my liking. I am a born Trini but have lived in Canada for almost 5 decades. After years of absence from the country, I have visited twice in the last two years. I have seen the worst customer service in all my travels in Trinidad. Whether it is the food server at the take out, the mini-bus, the stores or some of the better places. I find people act as if you are begging for something and not paying for it. They do not smile and are not polite and very abrupt. The T&T government needs to start educating the children, maybe they might take something home to their parents and run slogans on the TV and bill boards about customer service. I was ruffled a few times on my last trip and I am of mixed race. I could pass for half-indian, brown-skinned (Trini) or black as the North Americans say, or part Hispanic. So I would not say it is a racial thing. I would prefer to spend my vacations in Cuba. Jamaica or Mexico where I am treated with respect at all times. It seems that focus is placed on material things and people just having a good time, quite unlike when I was a child growing up there, when manners were important.
A reader replied recently with:
Hello All, I am new to commenting here, but I have a couple things I would like to add. I'm not an expat, but living here married to a Trini. I'm applying for residency, and applying for my wife's Visa, so we can travel together when we choose, and have the least restrictions (and headaches) as possible. I'll agree with comments posted about the traffic, higher prices for items such as food, furniture, etc. And yes, although dealing with the Bureaucracy here can be very frustrating, it's not much different than in the US. When was the last time you've been to the DMV? When people criticize crime rates and areas, you're going to get that anywhere in the world. You can be safe 24/7 by using what we all have, but it seems 50% or more people refuse to: COMMON SENSE! I lived in a very racist Brooklyn, NY neighborhood! (BTW, I'm white, not black) I was called everything but a white man, but if I were to defend myself I WAS THE RACIST ONE! I filed a racist profiling case against me with the NYPD and the Attorney General's Office in Oct '13. It was never resolved or followed up by either office! (A security guard confronted me after leaving a grocery store (FOODTOWN in BED-STUY) saying he wanted to search me because I was seen stealing something. My friend wasn't asked to be searched: She's black and was carrying a handbag big enough to hold a watermelon and chicken.) When you want to talk crime, watch the crime reports in Brooklyn, NY. Particularly, Bed-Stuy. Guns, killings, drugs etc. Enjoy TT and use your common sense about things.
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