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Sacred VAlley

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Mollie
1/2/2016 13:22 EST

HI everybody, who can give me information about the Sacred Valley? Like climate, possibilities of buying land off the beaten track, security, etc. I am in the process of doing my first explorations of the country by internet, then in a few months I'll come for a few weeks, see which area talks to me, etc. I am now waiting to hear back from a company who specializes in flying horses. I'll see where that gets me.

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pistachio
1/3/2016 06:30 EST

I would like to hear more about your flying horses.... not since Pegasus has anyone mentioned this....
for property searches try:

http://www.adondevivir.com/

Land is expensive as is the whole of the Real Estate market for some time now..... Cusco / Sacred Valley is quite a celebrity in the market / you can expect properties of any kind to be overvalues.....

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Mollie
1/31/2016 10:19 EST

Hi Pistachio,
Update on my "flying horses", they're not flying yet. So far I found one company who would do it, but it would be a harrowing journey for the equines, not to mention insanely expensive. So I am now looking at other options, such as ferrying a vehicle and a horse trailer from Costa Rica to Ecuador (not a problem for the vehicle, but not sure if it has ever been done with a horse trailer attached). Will come to Peru in November, to start looking around. Poco a poco. This will the move of all moves for me, for sure.
Suzanne aka Mollie

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Georg
1/31/2016 10:35 EST

Mollie,
It is possible that expats live in isolated clusters in several countries, but full disclosure, you should know that Peru has still active guerilla forces and that 17% of GDP is now from cocaine, according to National Geographic. Apparently, Columbian 'interests' have decided to 'outsource' a bit of production and distribution to nearby countries, so I do not know how this bodes of stability or personal safety in Peru, but these are factors to consider. I am certainly checking all of this, as well as visiting. Dept. of State does have a country briefing also, which is quite good and even tells you to be careful about getting into a cab in LIma as it could easily be a robbery, not a cab ride. Good luck with the horses.

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pistachio
1/31/2016 14:50 EST

I am sure flights for the horse is unimaginable ..... very expensive,,, as well, the preparation..
It may be that the only way will be with wheels but that is really Quite a task.
Well the trip is a one time event so you can get past it if you can get through it.
I suppose it is best that when you arrive you have a place for them that is ready to go...so you will have to look around. I am at a loss to give you any sensible information regarding moving horses from place to place. Maybe just ride them from Costa Rica to Peru, ha!
What are you priorities in terms of places that your thinking about here in Peru.
Thanks for keeping me up on your planning....

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pistachio
1/31/2016 14:56 EST

just to add, the mountain roads are pretty forboding, so having a trailer makes that sound even more treacherous. The roads do not have much of a shoulder, are not lit up and are sometimes narrow. Tour buses and trucks use the roads to and when you do not go fast enough for them it feels like they want to push you out of the way....
Then,, they will pass you even on dangerous curves,, well,, it all curves so I do not envy you making that trip.
The cliffs alone are enough for me to think twice. I am sure you are aware of this.
Just to say, I have found all land prices throughout Peru have risen steeply.. so I wonder about you finding a reasonable for a piece of property....but you will look and see you said in November.....
There is countryside here on the coast outside of Trujillo but it is desert and quite hot most all the time Especially in the Summer.....
We will talk again....
pistachio

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pistachio
1/31/2016 15:09 EST

There is a particular area where Coca production prevail and there are some conflicts. Peru produces more coca than any other country in SA ....That is production of raw material but not distribution of final product. Living in the area of Trujillo for a few years now I have had no visibility of any activities in that regard. It may go on in the background but who know. It does not affect daily living in Any regard. In all of Peru there are places know for safety and places known for danger....
I have frequented Lima and flagged down many many taxis without ever a hitch. Crime is Not Rampant and it is best not to exaggerate.
In all countries where there is a substantial of people who have little or nothing that there are crimes of theft... and usually not violent.
Traveling through many parts of Peru I have never been accosted by a robber or thief....
Of course, it is good to be sensible and wise but I do not see an overwhelming or ever present threat of danger.

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pistachio
1/31/2016 19:08 EST

to respond to your query about the possibility of Expats living in isolated clusters to imply that in their cloisters they are insulated and isolated from any realities of the country they are living in...
ok. I live in the La Libertad Province in the north. Trujillo would be the energetic city center. I have live here for a number of years in Trujillo and surrounding areas. I know of No expat groups official or otherwise. In fact there are few English or other speakers here except for native spanish. I visit any Bodega or Open Market, travel frequently in to the countryside where many have never even met a person from outside of Peru. I know a few folks from outside of Peru but 99% of my Peru Experience is 100% Peruvian. So, when I make any comments here on expatexchange it is from that experience and not an idealized or formulated thinking or experiential process.

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Georg
1/31/2016 22:04 EST

Context, Pistaachio, context. The note that in many places I've visited, there are "knots" of N. Americans, Europeans, etc. would be confirmed by many travelers, even if it does not apply to you. As to "conspiracy", plain facts are what they are, including the existence of a growing cocaine economy, unfortunate, but true. I did not cite any "conspiracy" to validate it, just a great source, although State Department usually stays on top of such things also and does warn about which parts of country are safer to visit and which are not. Should they ignore such warnings because that is not your experience there in Trujillo. Indeed, when I visited Cusco, I felt perfectly safe, but I was not a woman driving across the landscape pulling a trailer. You, yourself, warned her of the roads. Does that make you a conspiracy nut, or just, as pistachio implies, a nut?

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pistachio
1/31/2016 23:29 EST

georg,
I think you are reacting to a reply I made to Coogkelly on the thread of Land Ownership,
which had Nothing to do with Anything you said.
pistachio

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scumbuster
2/1/2016 06:50 EST

It is not possible to drive from Costa Rica to Peru. Or at least without a ferry involved. The Pan-American Highway does not go through south Panama-North Colombia. That area is the home of the Darrien Gap, which is impassable with no roads through it. There is a ferry, but just another obstacle in what would be a harrowing trip. As for the state department web site. I find their warnings bordering on paranoid. They want to make every place seem somewhat dangerous on the outside chance something happens, just to cover their ass. After living in Colombia the last 2 years and visiting for the last 10, I can vouch for the country not being, probably any more dangerous that most SA countries and much better than a few. Once your reputation is tarnished it is imposable to get it back. Other than a couple isolated pockets of jungle Colombia is pretty safe and I like Pistachio have traveled Colombia and found it to be quite safe and the people very friendly and welcoming. Petty crime is probably the biggest worry and violent crime for the most part is reserved for those in the drug trade. Pablo Escobar has been dead over 30 years now but the perception the country is still that way is still prevalent, promoted by the movie industry.

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scumbuster
2/1/2016 07:20 EST

So for the most part take the State Department warnings with a grain of salt and use common sense when traveling any SA country.

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