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Real Estate Areas, Political Climate, and Recommendations?

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Wrangler45
1/17/2021 14:46 EST

I am reviewing the option to move my family to Chile from the United States. I don't want to engage in a debate over politics in the U.S. but I did want to ask some questions about Chile, in hopes that some of you would provide helpful information (thank you in advance!).

1. Is Chile moving towards increased socialism or capitalism?

2. Is Chile a business friendly country to foreigners?

3. Where are the best places to look for a rural farm, with some hope of still obtaining high speed internet?

4. What kind of costs can I expect? Listings on-line at sites I can find are scarce and seem incredibly expensive. However, I suspect that's more to do with "foreigner facing web portals".

Any and all advice is greatly appreciated.

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cesarolga48
1/17/2021 15:50 EST

If you have kids I recommend our community for families.

https://www.viviun.com/AD-271264/

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Need health insurance in Chile? William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite).

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cesarolga48
1/17/2021 16:04 EST

1. Is Chile moving towards increased socialism or capitalism? Left and right take turns, right now is capitalism and probably goes toward socialism next year.

2. Is Chile a business friendly country to foreigners? Yes very friendly, just bring some new ideas and some capital.

3. Where are the best places to look for a rural farm, with some hope of still obtaining high speed internet? If you wan to farm 365 days a year go to Maule region, 70% of Chilean food is produced in Maule region.

You can always get satélite WiFi

4. What kind of costs can I expect? Listings on-line at sites I can find are scarce and seem incredibly expensive. However, I suspect that's more to do with "foreigner facing web portals".
You can build a house using local materials for around 60.00 square ft, and 100.00 psf using imports, and a little bit of both for around 80.00.psf.

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cesarolga48
1/17/2021 16:52 EST

Check viviun.com for real estate

Lots of farms for sale

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FAIRCLOUGH
1/17/2021 17:21 EST

Chile has had more socialist governments than republican. Of course socialism in the US is associated with comunism. There are many very healthy socialist countries around the world that are seldom mentioned. The difference is when you combine socialism with corruption you most likely get communism. Likewise if you com.bine corruption with democracy, well, you know what that is like.
The interesting fact is that unlike most of Latin America Chile is quite stable. The dollar to Chilean Peso has oscilated between 700 and 800 pesos to the dollar for the last decade or more. We retired in Pucon, in the South of Chile. A region I would describe as like living in Lake Tahoe but without the snow. We do have ski slopes but the city only gets a "dandruff attack" of snow every two or three years. No AC required in summer and heating in winter is mostly firewood or propane.
We came here to retire and get away from crime, road rage, discrimination, pollution, expensive healthcare, etc. Our home is on 3.3 acres of forest overlooking the lake and with a clear view of the Villarica volcano in the back yard. Town is 3 miles away. Cost of living in our case is around 30K /year.
Our property has appreciated over the last four years and the best way to find a good deal is to work with the local realtors. Rent for a year or two while you scout the area.
The busness situation will depend on what you do. I could easily make a living here as an electrician, a gasfitter, a good mechanic, etc.
I am retired to I have ti fight the temptation. Reliability is key. Anyone who can work like they do in the US, say you will be here tomorrow at 8 and actually show up tomorrow at 8 will have a leg up over the competition.
Cars are cheaper than in the US. Gasoline is more expensive but I drive much less than I did in Houston.
Most food is cheaper and all organic. Things like shoes, paint, power tools are more expensive but otherwise things are a bit cheaper than in the US.
The people are wonderful, there is plenty to see and do. Definitely less stress.

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FAIRCLOUGH
1/17/2021 17:21 EST

Chile has had more socialist governments than republican. Of course socialism in the US is associated with comunism. There are many very healthy socialist countries around the world that are seldom mentioned. The difference is when you combine socialism with corruption you most likely get communism. Likewise if you com.bine corruption with democracy, well, you know what that is like.
The interesting fact is that unlike most of Latin America Chile is quite stable. The dollar to Chilean Peso has oscilated between 700 and 800 pesos to the dollar for the last decade or more. We retired in Pucon, in the South of Chile. A region I would describe as like living in Lake Tahoe but without the snow. We do have ski slopes but the city only gets a "dandruff attack" of snow every two or three years. No AC required in summer and heating in winter is mostly firewood or propane.
We came here to retire and get away from crime, road rage, discrimination, pollution, expensive healthcare, etc. Our home is on 3.3 acres of forest overlooking the lake and with a clear view of the Villarica volcano in the back yard. Town is 3 miles away. Cost of living in our case is around 30K /year.
Our property has appreciated over the last four years and the best way to find a good deal is to work with the local realtors. Rent for a year or two while you scout the area.
The busness situation will depend on what you do. I could easily make a living here as an electrician, a gasfitter, a good mechanic, etc.
I am retired to I have ti fight the temptation. Reliability is key. Anyone who can work like they do in the US, say you will be here tomorrow at 8 and actually show up tomorrow at 8 will have a leg up over the competition.
Cars are cheaper than in the US. Gasoline is more expensive but I drive much less than I did in Houston.
Most food is cheaper and all organic. Things like shoes, paint, power tools are more expensive but otherwise things are a bit cheaper than in the US.
The people are wonderful, there is plenty to see and do. Definitely less stress.

Post a Reply

0abuse

William Russell International Health Insurance

Need health insurance in Chile? William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite).

Get a Quote

FAIRCLOUGH
1/17/2021 17:22 EST

Chile has had more socialist governments than republican. Of course socialism in the US is associated with comunism. There are many very healthy socialist countries around the world that are seldom mentioned. The difference is when you combine socialism with corruption you most likely get communism. Likewise if you com.bine corruption with democracy, well, you know what that is like.
The interesting fact is that unlike most of Latin America Chile is quite stable. The dollar to Chilean Peso has oscilated between 700 and 800 pesos to the dollar for the last decade or more. We retired in Pucon, in the South of Chile. A region I would describe as like living in Lake Tahoe but without the snow. We do have ski slopes but the city only gets a "dandruff attack" of snow every two or three years. No AC required in summer and heating in winter is mostly firewood or propane.
We came here to retire and get away from crime, road rage, discrimination, pollution, expensive healthcare, etc. Our home is on 3.3 acres of forest overlooking the lake and with a clear view of the Villarica volcano in the back yard. Town is 3 miles away. Cost of living in our case is around 30K /year.
Our property has appreciated over the last four years and the best way to find a good deal is to work with the local realtors. Rent for a year or two while you scout the area.
The busness situation will depend on what you do. I could easily make a living here as an electrician, a gasfitter, a good mechanic, etc.
I am retired to I have ti fight the temptation. Reliability is key. Anyone who can work like they do in the US, say you will be here tomorrow at 8 and actually show up tomorrow at 8 will have a leg up over the competition.
Cars are cheaper than in the US. Gasoline is more expensive but I drive much less than I did in Houston.
Most food is cheaper and all organic. Things like shoes, paint, power tools are more expensive but otherwise things are a bit cheaper than in the US.
The people are wonderful, there is plenty to see and do. Definitely less stress.

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Selah
2/22/2021 16:06 EST

Chile is definitely moving towards socialism/communism and I don’t mean the European kind. Until October 2019 was a tremendous place to live. Modern, stable and prosperous. Then came October 2019. Ther was an explosion of violence, arso, destruction and mayhem Everyday citizens were harassed and abused. It only abetted somewhat due to the drastic COVID lockdowns which are still in place. There is a presidential election this November. Wait at least 6 months after that to see what happens. The Left in Chile is just like the radical Left in USA. If they can’t win the election they will steal it with violence, fraud and intimidation.

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