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bringing in vehicles over 10 years old

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rainyj
9/2/2015 22:01 EST

please help...any info regarding logistics of getting a jeep(is it considered a truck) over 10 years old...i am driving down from canada with intent to retire...i want my jeep...please advise

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KeyWestPirate
9/3/2015 08:59 EST

If you email me a pic I'll show it to a customs agent at Espino as I go through. I don't have the answer.

There IS an exception for "classic" vehicles . . . but the criteria is complicated: burden of proof is on you. As I remember, over 25 years, proof of a "classic car club" for that model.

We had a guy tow a volkswagen based dune buggy down behind his motor home. He was initially unsuccessful in convincing them to allow him to register it,, and I haven't been keeping track of his recent efforts.

Pic should include as much data as possible. NetLinkDigital@hotmail.com

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TerryCicada
9/3/2015 10:45 EST

Yes, I also have the same question.
am converting my 1971 vw to run on a electric motor and lithium batteries. It will get its energy from the solar system or grid of the house . I should be able to get about 160km per full charge.
Do you think I will have a problem bringing it down to NICA ?
There are lots of old vw or kombis still running in c. america which are ideal for conversion. It will be great if more people can move away from fossil fuel. The technology is here and affrodable compared to five years ago.

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rainyj
9/3/2015 11:12 EST

thanks so much for the offer, when are you crossing...does anyone know what the rules are regarding trucks...

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mapper55
9/3/2015 12:22 EST

I have heard a lot of stories about bringing in a car older than 10 years and none have ended well. One story in particular is 'you can donate it to a charity and buy it back for some small donation'. This usually ends with the charity rep asking for the donation first, and then for fees to pay for this, that, and the other. 'Just one more fee', 'just one more fee', until you give up. Unless you have a sentimental attachment to that particular Jeep, sell it before you come and buy something similar when you're settled in.

As for the conversion car, consider the current car a test run, and bring down just the conversion parts when you move. You can buy a donor body when you get here and build it again, correcting all the mistakes you made the first time. Just be aware that the value of the parts may be the new value rather than what you paid for them if you bought them used. This could make a difference with the $20,000 household goods allowance which only applies after you have 'Resident Pensioner' status.

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prpcof
9/3/2015 12:41 EST

Hi I heard that you can bring a work vehicle in if it is older that 10 years. How the work designation is reached I do not know. I am going to attempt to bring a 1998 pickup when I start the move. Hope I can It runs well and has all the goodies. 4 wheel drive a/c etc...

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TerryCicada
9/3/2015 14:07 EST

Mapper55
Thanks for the suggestion.
That was what I had in mind.
1. Sell off my converted car in the US to a friend..
2. get the components, motor, inverter and electronics and even pay for the
import tax.
3. Look for a donor car.
As long as the 4 speed transmission works and it
is not rusted to the core.
    Noticed there are lots of these kombi vans built in mexico and brazil still running around. These will be ideal for the job due to their simple design.
4. You can actually buy a minielectric  car for less than  US10k from China. Many are already used as taxicabs in some cities in China. Their
govt is encouraging the purchase of electric cars which has no waiting time
for registration. Others have to get on the long waiting list and pay hefty registration fees..  But getting it into Nicaragua could be a hassle.. I need to study the laws further on this..Also due to protective regulatory issues you do not see many of them in the US. Look at the problems Tesla has trying to set up distributorships in the US even though they are luxury models at
  US80K.
The electric car is a game changer, oil companies and internal combustion vehicle manufacturers are not too happy about this evolution. Even Edison saw this vision 80 to 100 years ago.

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atz111
9/3/2015 14:56 EST

Let us know when this becomes a reality for you in Nica. I'll add some incentive…10 to 1 bet for $1,000 bucks you cannot do it in 3 years.

Don't get me wrong….It is a noteworthy idea but just will not happen here as you plan it, or even close to what you say…you are overwhelmed with the romance of it…but do not see much reality.

There is no big conspiracy again Tesla or other elec cars in the USA…read the current stuffsnd not the anti everything forums.

Let me know on the wager...

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mapper55
9/3/2015 15:19 EST

As far as I know a Jeep is not considered a Truck for import purposes but I'd like to get a more definitive answer as well.

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KeyWestPirate
9/3/2015 17:31 EST

I brought in two Ford F250 diesels, one 4WD..

No Problem.

About $1K total each with customs agent fees.

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atz111
9/3/2015 17:33 EST

BS.

You also went to the moon in 1954.

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KeyWestPirate
9/3/2015 17:42 EST

Welllll, . . . . . .

Anyone who wants to see pics of my two trucks, one very recent one loaded with furniture I'm moving out of the Condega house, but I have many others . . . . . .

Ask to see a pic of the 24 FT fifth wheel trailer I hauled down year before last too towed by the 1986 Ford F250


Just send me an email. Happy to satisfy anyone's doubt.
NetLinkDigital@hotmail.com

I can attach a copy of the Nica registration for the trucks when I get down there end of next week with my Ford F-150

HAVE NOT been to the moon yet.

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KeyWestPirate
9/3/2015 17:46 EST

See earlier posts. Trucks do not have a date, except and this is important, IF you are importing and using your residency exoneration you still much adhere to the 7 year rule.

Even if it's a truck.

However, import fees on old trucks are small. So, you may want to save your exoneration and use it for something else.

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KeyWestPirate
9/3/2015 18:20 EST

For the doubters:

There is a thread you can search for on The Real Nicaragua that shows a pic of the Ford truck I brought down.

That was a 1992 Ford F250 Diesel 4X4. We paid about $1K duty and customs' agent fee. Great farm truck, but not something you want to drive around most Nica cities.


Truck was registered in Nicaragua without problem, and we are STILL waiting for our license plates.


Google: The Real Nicaragua and then search for:

Grapes of Wrath IV: The White Man's Burden.

I believe that was trip four, I'm currently at eight now if I recall correctly.

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rainyj
9/7/2015 00:32 EST

well thanks everyone, i am think i have determined through all my research, trucks are different, however, wth is my jeep classified as 'cause sure not a car...anyone know about suv's because thats probably the classification, or does anyone have an actual link in canadian...there are obviously clear laws, but i can't seem to find them...

heres another thought...can a nicaraguan buy a car from lets say el salvador thats older than 10 years??? i know people in both countries, could sell to one, other could buy it and i can buy it back...

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waltermboyles
9/7/2015 09:12 EST

Where is your suv licensed? C.A. countries are very tolerant of extended stays from other C.A. countries = years. From Gringolandia, who knows?
H2O 212f

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rainyj
9/7/2015 10:54 EST

i am from canada, looking for residency but open to visiting for extended periods, open to setting anywhere in central america but nicaragua is first choice, can a visitor bring a car in older than 10 years?

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mapper55
9/7/2015 11:27 EST

I don't doubt anyone's word here, and I understand that with the proper application of 'grease' almost anything is possible. This got me pretty curious so I did a little searching. This is the 'official' Nicaragua Customs web site:

http://www.dga.gob.ni/

The first bullet point under the 'Aviso' translates:

It is prohibited to import vehicles, including small trucks of body type Pick Up, more than ten years old. This prohibition applies also to vehicles consigned to Nicaraguan repatriates, resident pensioners or resident 'rentistas'.

It is pretty clear that if you are importing a vehicle using your import duty exemption under pensionado or rentista residential status, it must be less that 10 years old.

The most obvious 'loopholes' would be other categories of residency, and the rules may be different if you are not using the exemption.

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atz111
9/7/2015 11:48 EST

You are correct...Jeep or light PU are not trucks by definition of customs regs.

Listen...you can do all the finagling you want and lord knows the advice on it that flows in volume on here...most of it a guess or just BS...lots of these guys would rather give bad info than not post. You will spend money and time and still may not make it happen and it will not be worth it even if you do...unless of course you have nothing better to do. But then, of course, you will have a war story and can join the storytelling crowd on here.

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prpcof
9/7/2015 12:50 EST

Hi,
I read it also. My interpretation is that you are correct in that if you bring it in under any of the exemptions. It must be under 10 years old. But if you have residency you can bring in a pickup as a work vehicle that is older than 10 years and pay what ever the duty and tax's are. May Nica contractors bring in older work equipment and vehicles. It is still cheaper to do. so. Atz I hope you see that not all are trying to BS. All the info giver must have due diligence done by the interested. It could be a starting place to get the real info. Like their are some who still believe it is still 7 years instead of 10.

I like this blog because it gives me different views. Thoughts to investigate. Not to take to the church.

People should not listen to the egos or mind sets. Research and due diligence. After picking up a view or idea from here can be a shortcut.

The pickup info came from a Nica heavy equipment company owner. Two things I have to check is if it is easier or for Nicas only. there is some question that if it has a cab is it stilled considered a pickup.

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prpcof
9/7/2015 12:55 EST

Forgive the typos. Trying to walk on
water is a distraction.

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KeyWestPirate
9/7/2015 14:12 EST

As a tourist you cannot register a vehicle. You can use a straw man and drive the vehicle with a CARTA Poder. This is very common, vehicles are sold with a bill of sale and Carta Poder, often multiple times. The registration never changes.

If you are here as a tourist, and your car is here on a tourist permit, the permit has to be renewed every 30 days. Nicaragua is by far the most restrictive of all the CA countries.

One renewal can be had easily in Managua, and the car does not have to be there. Some one else can do it with a Carta Poder, a business opportunity waiting for someone.

After the second 30 days, yo do have to leave the country. Simplest and fastest is through Penas Blancas to the south. There is no charge for the car going back and forth, although you will pay $2 to leave Nicaragua, a $7 CR exit tax, and $12 to re-enter Nicaragua.

Your tourist visa is reset at this point, you have another 90 days, even as you car only has 30. However, you can renew again in Managua for 30, and 60 days later make the border run to Penas Blancas, again.

You can also go to Honduras, which is attractive if you are in the north, but there are two disadvantages: your personal visa does not reset, and you have to pay for the Honduras car permit.

Neither of these two options are particularly time consuming, or difficult,, especially after you have completed them once or twice.

As far as, "can you import a car into Honduras, El Salvador, or Guatemala", certainly you could, but I don't know the residency limitations in those countries, or the rules as to age of vehicles.

Two+ years ago, you did not have to be a resident to import a vehicle into Costa Rica, but they have since changed that rule.

You can contact me if you need a reliable straw man. I use my farm foreman for much of this. He's honest and reliable. Once the vehicle is imported and registered, it no longer matters who is driving it as long as the Carta Poder is in place.

Choose your straw man carefully. It should not be a casual relationship, but one that has some grounding. There are a few solid expat residents who would also help you. One has been here awhile and also does residency applications. This might be a solution for an vehicle like a Ford Ranger or Toyota Tacoma,, while your residency application is processed, where the import duties are minimal. And, it would have to be a pickup to beat the 7-10 year rule.

It would NOT be a solution for a newer, more expensive vehicle, as the duties would be high.

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KeyWestPirate
9/7/2015 14:26 EST

The problem with this interpretation is, I have two Ford F250 pickups, legally imported and registered.

I have a friend,, a rentistsa,, who drives an old Ford Ranger, 1999, I think it is, legally imported and registered.

Nobody greased anyone, and in fact, the import process goes through the Aduana computer system. If you arrive at El Espino, as many of the trucks, buses, etc,, do, you will have to hire a customs agent as he is the only one with access to the Aduana server. You can't do it yourself, but the charge is small for all he does. It's his responsibility to verify all the vehicle information, including the often elusive "chassis number" I remember $125

The paperwork is generated in Managua where duties are assessed, and then the information and documents are transmitted electronically.

ONLY THEN do the Nicaraguan customs officials get involved.

I've been through the process, and although things change, and interpretations vary (as was the case with commercial vehicle importers who mis-understood the 7/10 year rule chanage, my last experience is only a year old.

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naturechild
9/7/2015 14:58 EST

It is not a requirement that you be legal resident to import a vehicle into Costa Rica.
Neither is there any age restriction of the vehicle, at least at this time, although they must pass the RITEVE inspection before they are permitted on the road.

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KeyWestPirate
9/7/2015 15:26 EST

Are you absolutely sure of that, Nature Child?

I just sold my Costa Rica plated vehicle two months ago, a 2007 Highlander, and was told at the time by the buyer, who has been a long time CR resident with a CR wife, that the law has has been changed, and that now only a CR resident can register a vehicle.

When I initially imported the vehicle into CR that was not the case.

Costa Rica also assesses a yearly property tax on the vehicle, on mine it was a little over $400 yearly.. This was in addition to the insurance and registration. Registration renews annually in CR, and without a current Riteve, no registration. Your registration in Nicaragua in good forever, no annual renewal. No property tax.
Insurance is $55 /year for Nica Plated private vehicles.

I wish we had Riteve in Nicaragua. Very few vehicles smoke in Costa Rica, while just about every vehicle smokes in Nicaragua.

Importing a vehicle into CR doesn't solve the Nicaragua problem. Costa Rica is not part of the C-4 zone, so a CR vehicle visits Nicaragua on the same 30 day permiso. True, it's easy to buzz into and out of CR on a CR vehicle, but the 30 day limitation still applies.

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naturechild
9/7/2015 16:13 EST

Yes, I am sure.
There isn't a yearly property tax on vehicles, but you could be referring to tax, of $400 if a vehicle is being held in an 'active' S.A. (Sociedad Anonima/corporation) or in an inactive S.A., $200.

This is not compulsory although years ago, people were 'advised' to do so to protect their assets in case of an accident and from being sued. This is no longer being encouraged considered 'necessary' now.

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KeyWestPirate
9/7/2015 16:31 EST

Interesting.

I paid a little over $400 each year, payable at the time the vehicle registration was renewed, for three years. When I asked why so much, I was told it was property tax on the vehicle. They had originally valued it at $18K, and I paid $11k in import duties.

It's one of the reasons I finally sold the vehicle.

I had several prospects for the vehicle, but the eventual buyer was a U of Nebraska professor and his Tica wife.

He had come to Turrialba as a grad student from the University of Arizona, first job,, married a pretty costeña, and spends as much of the year there as he can.


Steve was the one who told me that the law about non-residents registering vehicles in Costa Rica had changed.

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naturechild
9/7/2015 16:42 EST

Well, I have never paid a property tax on my vehicles. I have imported one and bought 2 in CR .

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rainyj
9/8/2015 01:01 EST

holy cow, i am more confused than ever and want to know how I too, can walk on water!

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rainyj
9/8/2015 01:05 EST

carta poder...let me understand...i sell my jeep which is older than 10 years to someone i know in nica and they register it and i drive it? but i can never buy it back?

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atz111
9/8/2015 08:04 EST

I told you. You are lucky, you see through the BS. Think of all the fools who just go for this stuff hook line and sinker...and they exist...made to think Nica is in a special atmosphere exempt from the rule of logic and known only to the 3-4 guys on here who profess to know all the ways around and in the system. And KWP has yet to weigh in with 14 paragraphs about his multitude of experiences in doing this many times. Man...you should have never asked about walking on water...they will start with their life experiences in doing it. They don't get it. Period.

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KeyWestPirate
9/8/2015 09:50 EST

".....carta poder...let me understand...i sell my jeep which is older than 10 years to someone i know in nica and they register it and i drive it? but i can never buy it back? . .."

No, you misunderstand. If the jeep cannot be imported by you, it cannot be imported by a Nica.

If it's NOT importable, it's not importable. Doesn't matter, Gringo, Nica.

Nicaragua is becoming less and less "grease friendly". With the exception of the transito police who seem to have a license to steal, I see less and less bribery every year.

Small gifts help a lot: a box of donuts to the Intur lady is greatly appreciated. This is part of the Nica culture.

I stated a simple fact of life in Nicaragua. Many vehicles that are sold, are sold with a bill of sale and a Carta Poder. The title doesn't change. Since the Nica registration is good forever, and registering a vehicle is difficult, this has become an accepted way of doing business. License plates typically take a year to obtain in Nicaragua, after the registration process is completed successfully.

In terms of the vehicles, I don't know of any way to beat the system in terms of imports.

. Any number of commercial importers got caught up in the 7 year/ 10 year rule change, and have scores of vehicles rotting at border entry points. They were not able to bribe anyone.

I DO have some experience with both the importation process, and with maintaining a vehicle in Nicaragua over a long term on a tourist permit. I've done both successfully.

I've described the events I've experienced, and witnessed, with honesty and as much clarity as I could.

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rainyj
9/8/2015 10:01 EST

ok, thank you, that is more clear...if i am "just a tourist" and not seeking residency and not staying, will my older jeep be permitted in?...and i can stay 90 days, but my jeep only 30, so i need to cross border every 30 days to renter with my jeep?...how crazy...the 30 and 90 day difference...is this correct now...i realize i seem confused but how could i not be....sooooo many different opinions and experiences...

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atz111
9/8/2015 10:01 EST

KWP..."honesty and clarity"...YOU...come on...the BS from you is so thick it comes through on the computer screen...read you post above...about three back....where you offer your services and you foreman...that post is a lot different than what you say in the last one..pick one lie and stick to it...

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atz111
9/8/2015 10:05 EST

rainj...KWP has been in Nica 7 years and has not gotten residency...as you see he (says) he juggles his time to the border to keep it all going...if he does all that is it silly to say the least.....I guess he cannot get his police check.

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rainyj
9/8/2015 10:13 EST

well this gets more interesting by the minute, unfortunately work is calling my name and then off for a few days, my brother has a lot of experience with classic vehicles and car clubs, and i can get collectors plates for my jeep...is that a realistic possibility...looks like i'm selling the jeep i just spent lots of money on to make sure its in excellent shape...so much for my roadtrip...damn...i cant afford a newer vehicle...thanks to everyone for your time and comments....

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KeyWestPirate
9/8/2015 10:37 EST

I think -but don't know- that you might have a chance importing the jeep under a classic exception.

As I remember age comes into play here too, I remember 25 years but am not certain.

I was involved at one point with a gentleman who attempted to import a fiberglass body / volkswagen engine dune buggy as a classic and was unsuccessful.

If you can show "clubs" associated with your jeep, you may have a shot. Unfortunately, I don't think that you will get a decision without the jeep being in Nicaragua.

You do understand that you could bring it in on a tourist permit while you make your case that it's a classic?

Once someone says "yes" ,, the import process goes quickly.

If they say "no" you should have a plan B in mind, or plan on driving it as a tourist vehicle with the necessity of leaving the country every 60 days.

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KeyWestPirate
9/8/2015 10:50 EST

I haven't got residency because I spend as much time in the US as I do in Nicaragua at the moment. At this moment in time I've been in Tucson two months, coming back again this month (driving).

That will change when my wife retires in another four years. Right now, since I leave before my 90 days is up anyway, the residency is less advantageous than if I were there full time.

However, I do plan on pursuing my residency this coming year. The police check is not an issue.

There are other considerations: I have excellent health insurance in Tucson that requires me to be six months in the market area. I doubt -and hope- that they would ever check, but it is a consideration. I understand that many Canadians have this concern too.

Residency isn't for everyone. Many people only spend part of the year in Nicaragua. Others are new to the country. I would encourage anyone to live in Nicaragua as a tourist until you determine that you really like it there.

Moving the vehicle out of the country every 60 days and back is a pain, but not a terrible one. The 30 day renewal in Managua is fast and easy, and the vehicle does not have to be there.

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23columbia
10/1/2015 13:04 EST

please only reply if you have current factual information, not what u did 2 years ago or under the table or underhanded. does anyone know of a person who has the answers, not guesses, for reidency, importation etc. i became a resident pensionado 2 1/2 years ago, well got approval, but had to get back to the US the week before i could sign and get my cedula card.. i kow it was good for 5 years. is my case still active. i,m returning now, i want to import my 2010 pick up, but also a trailer and a 1917 car. i know!, this is crazy. can i get my cedula, can i import my truck under my personal exemptions, and what do i do about the trailer and antique car. i know this is complicated. i already contacted a few informed individuals , including Mr Tiffer, but none had definitive answers. i don,t want to arrive at the border on hunches or so and so told me, etc. can someone reccommend the right person to me. thanks so much

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novato1953
10/1/2015 13:34 EST

Whoa Nellie, 23Columbia, and mucus garcias for putting all that in a, what do you call it?, nutshell. Que le vaya bien!

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23columbia
10/1/2015 13:57 EST

like i said, please respond only if your information is current, correct and valuable!

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atz111
10/1/2015 14:55 EST

How are we to know if its valuable? If Tiffer does not know…then tough to say who would. Maybe one of JC's boys, but they all be ted up till xmas. Or maybe he does and just does not eel simpatico...Lose the attitude bro…or you'll have a bad time here. Better yet, STFH.

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elduendegrande
10/1/2015 16:22 EST

If you don't have your cedula and don't have the permanent resident stamp in your passport (you get both at the same time) then you don't exist.
First things first.

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novato1953
10/2/2015 09:52 EST

Years ago I got both the marriage license and cold feet before the wedding ceremony, but now I'm back so we're married.

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dickcobbs1
10/8/2015 01:39 EST

Hi KWP, Still unable to legalize my dune buggy. Last I heard aduana wanted $5000.00! Next time you go to El Espino look opposite Gallo Pinto. The buggy and the camper are in my driveway. Shook hands twice to sell the buggy and the buyers never came back! The second one was a buyer for the government! Finally saved up for a 1981 toyota pickup, had it two weeks now.
My advice on importing FORGET IT!!!

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KeyWestPirate
10/8/2015 12:47 EST

Hey Dick:


How much do you want for the dune buggy?
You still have it,,, right?

I swore I'd never post here again, but

1,, am interested in your dune buggy;

2, They changed the rules on the import of pickups, from no date to 10 years.
I got in under the wire with my two big ford diesels.

Unfortunately, there are others here who missed the deadline and are kind of stuck with vehicles they cannot nationalize.

Couldn't get an exact date from Aduana when I came through Espino, but it was six - 8 months ago that the rule actually changed. Don't know exactly when the implementation took effect, BUT a lot of people got caught up in the rule change.

Right now,, 2005 is the oldest that can come in. Bigger work trucks, like small box trucks through trucks like the International 38 footer I have in Arizona are still exempt from the ten year rule. Import taxes on these are surprisingly low!!!

Another thing: Buses now have to be 2005 or newer too. There is usually at least one bus towing another bus at Espino waiting to clear through. This time,,, nada.

Dick, email me at NetLinkDigital@hotmail.com if you want to sell the Dune Buggy.
I really don't want to spend any more time than necessary on this site.

Would be nice to see you again . . . catch up.

Call me 8223 5810

ATZ: Shove any reply you might have up your ass sideways; I sincerely hope we meet some day. .

.. . You remind me of that fat lesbian who used to troll NicaLiving.


John

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satx78247
12/17/2015 20:01 EST

Hi Everyone,

I'm brand new here & am trying to find out if I can import my 1992 FORD F-250 7.3 DIESEL PU into Nicaragua.
(I cannot afford a newer truck on my pension & I need a large truck to pull a boat.)
I plan to retire (as a pensionado) to Leon in 2016, though I'm unsure as to what Summer month that that will happen, yet.

Does anyone KNOW how to do this for sure??
(I tried to PM KeyWestPirate but for some reason, my PM seems NOT to have gone through.)

THANKS for reading this note & MERRY CHRISTMAS.

yours, satx78247.

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dickcobbs1
12/17/2015 23:20 EST

Again, I would say,forget it! My neighbor flew to the U.S. several months ago and bought a 2002 pickup. After two 30 day renewals, he drove it back, sold it and bought a 2010 model, and drove back again!
RWC

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dalepues
12/19/2015 17:33 EST

I once imported a Cursor Model truck and didn't have to pay anything. I just walked down the escalator to immigration and set it on the counter. The officer seemed not to notice it. I have heard through the grapevine that you can be charged a pretty stiff tax for Tonka or a Hess. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cursor_Models

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satx78247
12/19/2015 17:57 EST

Dick Cobbs & ALL,

What really "hacks me off" about the SILLY rule on older trucks is that my 1992 Ford F-250 is a NICER-looking & BETTER-built pickup than 99% of the trucks on the road anyplace on Planet Earth & the IH indirect-induction 7.3L engine is faultmess.
(178,000 total one-owner miles, which is "nothing for a medium-duty diesel engine", repainted & a new interior a year ago.)
Note: An equivalent NEW Ford diesel truck would be about 60,000USD, which I cannot afford at all.)

Governments everywhere are essentially the same: Filled with DUMB-BUNNIES who know ZILCH & do things the easy way.

just my OPINION, satx

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KeyWestPirate
12/19/2015 23:43 EST

It's a shame. You missed the window by about a year. I brought in two Ford F250 diesels before they changed the rule,, a 1986 and a 1992..

At least you didn't arrive here with the vehicle,, needing to punt,, as many others did.

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atz111
12/19/2015 23:49 EST

The rule has been here since at least 2009. So you brought these in when? And you did this without residency...wow. OK, I guess just another way of telling us all about you possesions. Welcome back to the BS trail left by the pyrite...the fool's gold.

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satx78247
12/20/2015 00:01 EST

atz111,

In any case& at any date that the foolishness was passed, that is a REALLY STUPID rule, don't you agree??
(The older that I get the less tolerance that I have for intrusive, empty-headed bureaucrats, who "know NOT & know NOT that they know NOT".)

Also, for a country that encourages retirees to live in their nation & add needed foreign exchange to the local economy, it seems to me that Nicaragua is "shooting themselves in the foot" by doing anything that "hacks off" the retirees.

yours, satx

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atz111
12/20/2015 08:53 EST

Yeah, kind of makes no sense. Be interesting to hear what the rationale is. Most other things here seem to be OK in this regard. I brought my Jeep in in 2009...it is 2003 so just passed muster...now six years later and 13 years old ticks right along. I don't think Nica is in a big expat migration courting mode...they take what comes. My guess is will be fewer as things here get more towards the normal on price. We have a lot of lowball income expats and that is the only reason many are here. Getting hard to live any kind of life on $800 a month.

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Wjohan
12/29/2015 16:52 EST

You should probably contact a shipper or broker, if only to figure out if you're allowed to bring in a car that old and if there are any other hoops to jump through. It's not an easy process.

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satx78247
12/29/2015 21:19 EST

Dear All,

I may have found the perfect solution. = A 2007 Ford F-150 extended cab with GOOD body/interior but a DEAD engine & bad transmission.

Replace the gas/dead engine with a CUMMINS 4BT & a 5-speed & you could pull a house with it.
(The 4BT is "a BEAST" & being a medium duty industrial engine, you'd never wear one out in a PU.)

I probably don't know over 2 dozen people here in Bexar County that would like to have my F-250 Diesel.

yours, satx

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dickcobbs1
1/5/2016 02:58 EST

In response to Wjohan re hiring an agent. I hired a Senior Cruz at the aduana headquarters in Managua. He took my money and did nothing! When a friend accused him he said "Sue me!" Just about everybody that I have had dealings with in this lousy country has managed to steal my money! The only reason to be here is low cost of living. But, it ain't great livin'!
RWC

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atz111
1/5/2016 08:35 EST

You be a marked man. Sounds like you might have a self induced problem as most of us deal with all types of locals and do OK...or even better. Too bad you hate it so much here...hell of a way to live a life. For those contemplating moving here, take note. You will need to have the right attitude to have a good time.

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atz111
1/5/2016 08:35 EST

You be a marked man. Sounds like you might have a self induced problem as most of us deal with all types of locals and do OK...or even better. Too bad you hate it so much here...hell of a way to live a life. For those contemplating moving here, take note. You will need to have the right attitude to have a good time.

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EighthWonder
7/2/2016 21:54 EST

You seem like just the guy I need advice from!
I'm wanting to head down to Nicaragua from Canada with a 2016 Jeep Wrangler and pulling a 2005 camper trailer.
What's your thoughts on the issues with that? Any?
And if anyone else has thoughts I'd love to hear them! Thank you!

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EighthWonder
7/3/2016 07:50 EST

Anyone know if there would be difficulties and huge import costs bringing in a 2016 Jeep Wrangler and pulling a 2005 camper trailer into Nicaragua? 

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mate31658649
7/3/2016 11:19 EST

Three and a half years ago, I shipped a 2011 KIA Sorrento from Florida to Nicaragua. We still have the car, but in hind-site, if I could do it over, I would have sold the car in Florida and bought a vehicle in Nicaragua. You can find what you need here with considerably less complication.

Something to consider: the warranty on your 2016 vehicle may not be honored in Nicaragua.

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EighthWonder
7/3/2016 11:46 EST

Thank you so much for your reply. I have to admit that it hurts to hear that LOL. It would probably be reasonable to assume based on what you said that pulling a camper across would make it even more complicated. I had a friend who brought a truck into Belize and got dinged $9,000 at the Border in tariffs duties taxes eCT. Is there a danger of that happening when bringing a vehicle into Nicaragua?

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atz111
7/3/2016 12:02 EST

Are you talking about coming in as a tourist? If so vehicle age/duty is not an issue (someone check me on this). If it is to import one (like as a resident) than it becomes an issue...so if you have residency and want to register it then there is a problem with the 10 year stuff. If you do not yet have residency, it will take 6-12 months to get that so in the meantime you could use it. The typical duty on trucks is between 30 and 60 %..depending mostly on engine size. They go by blue book Value...so yours is $5,000 in BB and if a 4 cyl duty would be about $2,000....6 cyl $3,000

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EighthWonder
7/3/2016 12:22 EST

Yes we would be driving it in initially as tourists but wanting to get residency. Driving allows us to bring some personal belongings. But we're debating doing that. We are hearing different details about how often we need to re-register the vehicle as a visitor as well as costs. Some say every 30 days some say 60 or 90.. We read that you can import a vehicle under 5 yrs old up to $25000 with NO duities but others say there are duties. Do you know which it is.

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atz111
7/3/2016 14:51 EST

As tourists no problem and remember it will take some time to gain residency. Until that time getting visa renewal for a vehicle is a PIA. Not sure if 20 or 90 days, but it is one of them. Means you need to drive to CR and back...not all that bad but a bit of a hassle crossing both ways. Cost are not all that much fr vehicle visa. When you get residency you can bring in vehicle with a $25,000 exemption. Note the exemption only applies after you have residency. Truth is that if you want a car whe here as tourists you have little choice but to bring it in.

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EighthWonder
7/3/2016 19:37 EST

I can't thank you enough, Sounds like I should pitch a tent close to the CR border for the 1st year! ;-)
If anything else comes to mind please don't hesitate to share!

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atz111
7/4/2016 09:42 EST

On the other hand....in the year as you get residency you may well find a Nicaraguan who is willing to buy it and deal with the registration process in some unique way...it happens here. They love jeep wranglers here. Mine (in very good shaoe) is worth $9,000 in the book and could get $11,000 EZ here. Or find someone driving back to USA and they can buy it and trade there.

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Gracenglory7
7/6/2016 18:27 EST

Don't bother. We drove down here from California with our 2005 Toyota Sienna and had to renew the permit every 30 days by going to the border. If you can even nationalize a 10 yr old car (which is supposedly impossible) The cost to nationalize will most likely be more than the car is worth. A friend paid $4000 to nationalize an $8000 truck. We thought we would sell ours but the minivan which was blue booked at about $10-12000, would only sell for $4-6000. Not to mention you will most likely have to have any car parts imported because you won't find them here. Bottom line:bringing a car here is a bad idea. Better to sell yours where you are and buy when you get here.

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satx78247
7/6/2016 20:11 EST

To All,

Fwiw, my "boarding school chum" wants my PU quite badly, so it will likely be sold to him shortly before I leave the USA.

Since some of you are there & I'm not, WHAT sort of truck should I look for to buy & that will pull a 1,000KG boat/motor/trailer??
(I'd prefer a diesel.)

yours, satx

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atz111
7/6/2016 20:17 EST

Not quite. If you have residency the cost to nationalize is just the cost of the tags...about 30 bucks. You get a $20,000 exemption. But 10 years is a hard one to get around. Your truck friend paid about what the normal duty is without an exemption...30 to 50 %......must have loved that truck....he paid on the high end of the duty...big engine probably. The BB value on you car today is about $6,000 for one in excellent shape...so unless this was a lot of years ago...like 5...your car had no where near the value you say......should have sold it for 6K you'd be ahead of the game. The OP here has a very different situation...a more desireable vehicle and some time to figure out what to do when he gets ready to register it. He likley can find a way to sell it...and a Jeep here goes for BB value easy.

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EighthWonder
7/6/2016 20:42 EST

Thanks guys,
I guess what is good is that my Jeep would be less then 5 years old. Correct?

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atz111
7/6/2016 20:45 EST

Yep. As a tourist you still have to get it out of the country every 30 or 90 days...not sure which....but not such a bad deal if in Granada or sourthern beaches pretty easy drive. If resident it will likley fall under the 20K exemption. There is now a jeep dealer in MGA so service is a bit better on newer jeeps.

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EighthWonder
7/6/2016 21:01 EST

Well that's great....as long as it doesn't take 2 years to get residency!! ;-)

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Gracenglory7
7/6/2016 22:04 EST

Its every 30 days.

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atz111
7/6/2016 22:56 EST

Safest bet is Toyota Hilux...several others to choose from here, but this seems to be the most popular by a mile. Good used buys as well.

I assume you mean buy it here?

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atz111
7/6/2016 22:56 EST

Safest bet is Toyota Hilux...several others to choose from here, but this seems to be the most popular by a mile. Good used buys as well.

I assume you mean buy it here?

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KeyWestPirate
7/7/2016 10:14 EST

" . . . Its every 30 days. ..."

I assume you are talking about car permit time for a tourist vehicle. That is correct, but, you can renew for 30 days in MGA for $1 /day..

After that renewal you have to loop out of the country. It's NOT that big a deal, especially if you go south to Peñas Blancas. This trip will also reset your tourist visa, so 30 days, renew in MGA, 30 days, you've got 30 left on your tourist visa by then,, needs to be renewed,,, renew by looping into CR, spend the night cheaply in La Cruz, see some country.

MGA Renewal: car doesn't have to be there, just all the paperwork. Don't forget title. Only fly here is,, MGA won't turn title same day.

So, you spend the night, hit the new PriceSmart on the Masaya Highway, tons of interesting hardware (and other) stores along that stretch too.

New PriceSmart is really nice, not crowded, much easier access,, more parking, less vagos.

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satx78247
7/7/2016 10:24 EST

YES, I meant buy the vehicle in Nicaragua.

THANKS for the advice.

yours, satx

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EighthWonder
7/7/2016 10:43 EST

Perfect.
Thank you Keywestpirate.
I guess once there it's not like you're in a real hurry for anything anyway!

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KeyWestPirate
7/7/2016 13:07 EST

I was in a dual cab diesel Mahindra not log ago. Quiet inside, dare I say luxurious ??

I thought it would be too small (at 6 feet) for me, but not the case.

Hilux is the gold standard here. Ticos ae buying BMW's and Audi's now; see a lot of full size Ford pickups in Honduras (a few here too, but not many).

I think you have to consider what your plans are. I drove a Yaris when I first came down here, with its front wheel drive it went everywhere. Part goat.

The newer ones are bigger, more luxurious inside. Hertz sells them out its rental fleet with 25 to 35K miles on them for $10 - 12K

The advantage of a hatchback like this, other than small size and ease of getting around, is your goods are secure inside.

After this last trip to PriceSmart, on the way back to Aduana to pick up my new car permit, I felt obliged to ride in the bed of the truck as we came on teh Caraterra Norte to avoid stray hands grabbing something out of the truck.

If you need to haul a lot of big stuff, pipe and perlines, the Yaris won't work :)

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NovaDuce
11/17/2016 14:57 EST

I know this topic has been worked and reworked but I am still confused. Can a vehicle older than ten years be brought in for 30 days at a time? We were planning to drive out 2004 Toyota Tundra if possible. With a slide in truck camper. We also have a thirty year old 50cc motorbike. I'm guessing this would also be a problem? Thanks all

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atz111
11/17/2016 16:36 EST

Not a problem to bring in on tourist visa. The restriction is to get it registered here as a Nica vehicle.

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KeyWestPirate
11/18/2016 20:07 EST

To add fuel to the fire and confuse the issue further, I talked to a friend who brought in a 1998 small pickup quite some time back.

He's in a rural location, after a few in and outs, it just sat on the farm.

He found someone to help him import it as a "parts vehicle". He was then somehow able to adjust the status.

He's been here for a while, works for someone well-connected (Ortega visited the farm two-three years ago),, so this is probably an exceptional end run that is not going to happen routinely.

He had to pay the $50 plus daily fine ($1 or $2,,overstay,, can't remember which).

NOW, I still haven't seen the vehicle with Nica Plates,,,but he swears that they are coming.

Rules change. I came through Las Manos this afternoon, astonished at how smooth the process went --until they couldn't decide what to do with the 33 lbs of coffee I picked up in Copan. Adding to the confusion is a current price differential paid for coffee by the beneficios in Nicaragua vs Honduras, The coffee growers only get 2500 limps a quintal in Honduras, but could get over 4000 limps in Nicaragua.

So, a certain amount of oro is probably being smuggled south. There are 23,000 coffee growers in the El Paraiso -Danli area, just over the border. They are really upset about the price difference. They want to sell their coffee in Nicaragua.

They finally let me slide, but not before talking to several of their compañeros. I had declared the coffee on my customs form, along with "souvenirs' worth $30.

Normally, they would have just glanced in the back of the truck and signed off on the form, but I had to pull out all the toys, hats, and shirts I brought as gifts.

However, they didn't have a problem with the 20 lbs of sweet potatoes I found for Thanksgiving, nor the monster watermelon I bought more as a curiosity.

My point: The rules change, or at least are subject to different interpretation,,, and sometimes by the minute.

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newton5boys
12/13/2016 19:26 EST

Was you able to find out about driving a truck into Nicaragua that is more than 10 years old? Im driving from texas to san juan de sur next week my truck in a ford f150 2003 can I get in?

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atz111
12/13/2016 20:17 EST

You can bring it in on a tourist visa no matter what the age..renew every 30 days by going out of country and back in. You cannot register it here over 10 years.

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romansalisbury
8/26/2019 12:15 EST

have over $30,000 in cost to my 1989 Jeep. have classic car membership what documentation is sufficient?

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elduendegrande
8/28/2019 09:11 EST

You might want to chat directly to Intur, they are in the business of encouraging expat relocations and probably have a lot of time on their hands lately. At least maybe they could refer you to the right person in Transito. Local cow town transito would probably have no idea what you are talking about or the applicable laws.

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johnchip
8/31/2019 07:49 EST

You may be surprised what a smile and a hundred or two $ in cordobas does for you with government officials.

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ddeubel
8/31/2019 12:00 EST

Oh true. But I've found no palms to grease when it comes to the 50% import tax they want ontop of the blue book value ...

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ddeubel
8/31/2019 13:10 EST

There was mention here about CA4 rules being different.

I brought my Guatemalan registered/plated car to Nica and only got 30 days every time. (and yes, extension is easy in Managua but told only once ever for each vehicle).

However, El Salvador, Honduras - no problem just coming in with the Guate car. No permits needed etc ... I've stayed in both countries for extended times with the car. Nicaragua has different rules than other CA 4 countries when it comes to cars anyways.

If anyone knows different about CA 4 cars and temporary import into Nica - please let me know. I've had it and will drive her back to Guate and park it or sell it. Will just buy something here in Nicaragua for use here. Frustrated but that's life.

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waltermboyles
8/31/2019 13:19 EST

As mentioned, a Salv citizen with Salv passport , Salv registration, & Salv driver license can get a year in NI. H2O 212F

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volcan357
8/31/2019 17:57 EST

I don't live in Nicaragua but I've lived in Panama for the past 20 years. One thing I've learned in Panama is that nothing seems to be consistent. Every time you try to do something the rules and regulations seem to be different. What might work today may not work tomorrow or vice versa. So you need to keep trying and keep asking. I can't imagine that Nicaragua would be any different. Latin American countries share a common mentality.

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ddeubel
9/9/2019 20:03 EST

Does anyone know the rules about getting an extra 30 days on a temporary import permit in Managua DGA?

I got one extension. Paid $30 for 30 days. Then went to Costa Rica. Got a new TIP.

Can I go back to DGA in Managua and get another extension for 30 days? Or is it just one time, all time?

Thanks in advance for your info.

DD

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calsrf
9/10/2019 10:50 EST

I had my truck here for 2 years. Out of the country every 30 days or extension for 30 days. You can't get 2 extensions in a row. Over the border for 3 days or I learned from the ayudantes that you can sneak back in the next day ?? because the shift changes every 24 hours and no will remember you. I got caught once by a Aduana but I just gave him 200 cords and continued through. Cheaper than 3 days of hostels and meals ??

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