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High tide

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IMBROKE
4/17/2018 15:59 EST

I understand when you buy land that you own 50 meters from high tide. In february I stayed at a home I was interested in purchasing. I paced off roughly 50 meters and found myself aproximatly in the center of the house! I guess I have 2 questions. Would the survey need to be adjusted? Could I do some kind of backfill beach repair to bring the waterline back to where it was?Thanks in advance.

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dollyd
4/17/2018 17:22 EST

I believe it is based upon how old your deed is. My old deed goes to the sea however there are restrictions on building now based on the coastal law. You should look up the coastal law and see what the restrictions are as they vary. I'm pretty sure on the mainland that you cannot build within 50 meters of the high tide but I'm not sure that means that you don;t own the land to high tide. No one owns the beach. The high tide line is constantly changing and the house you are looking at would no doubt be grandfathered in. Try measuring from a back line to the sea and find out where that stops.

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atz111
4/17/2018 18:39 EST

If you are thinking about buying you need a good lawyer who knows the regulations.....not just telling what they think. On the seafront that is a recipe for disaster. Been lots of changes and not everything is grandfathered in in a sale. The propert line is 50 or 100 meters ...I am not sure which but ez to find out in published sites.... from mean high tide. Mean high tide varies as much as 10 feet on a daily basis depending on lots of things...so one day the property will be a bit closer and on another a bit farther. There may also be some additional set back for a house. Used to be a wild time on property down there but now stricter and more every day. As far as rehabbing the beach to adjust the tide line........well simply put...there is no way except to erect a berm to hold it back but then you are into areas not owned by you and really breaking the law

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IMBROKE
4/18/2018 08:47 EST

The mean tide sounds a little promising.I was in Los Zorros this year and some properties had huge rocks in front with back fill. At One property you couldn't walk past at high tide.If these beaches don't get some attention soon the homes will be in trouble next

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johnchip
4/18/2018 10:16 EST

Interesting dilemma. I know of an incident in Costa Rica about 10-12 years ago when the government came in and bulldozed down some buildings which encroached this same law. A developer was building a resort and decided he could build as he wanted and put half his resort in the 'no-no' zone. Let's look at the circumstance. Who cares? The activation of local interest which motivated the government to get involved came from the encroachment of profiteering developers on the other-wise sleepy local community. Clearly, their target was the 'developer', not the local land users. Change will always come, but to what extent and to whose interest is a factor that one can reasonably gauge from the local accepted norms and what interest you can see may develop in the near future. If your property is not a sore thumb, one of a kind, imposing property in a hostile community, I would think in my personal lifetime left I would just move in and be happy. It takes a long time for a concept of enforcement on already existing properties to come to a government taking action. It is a long and expensive process for a government to undertake. Making noise to make change is likely only to come from outsiders or profiteers, both of which this government does not pay much heed to. I certainly would not be the one to draw attention to the issue. If it is an existing property, not a new build, likely we are not talking very expensive, not controversial, fitting into the norm of the community, so I would just relax and make sure your legal papers are in order.

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atz111
4/18/2018 11:26 EST

What john says is true. If you want to sell it may impede the next buyer who is more concerned. about that stuff. With only 50 meters from high tide to middle of my house, my immediate concern would be some storm surge...however moderate, they are often 50 meters, which means water in the house.. In general beaches erode over time..Some sand can be deposited on other beaches by what erodes and some just gets washed out. With luck you will be in the former category.

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feliceb
4/18/2018 14:58 EST

isn't that also what the NOL is about.We just got ours and now the municipality has to stamp approval on survey and NOL. We are a little closer than 50 meters-48.2 to be exact, but we were told by our lawyer that the 50 Mts applies from 2009 construction on ..and we are buying property built in 1998 and we have the title search back to 1917..so I agree a good lawyer is the first and utmost thing!
feliceB

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feliceb
4/18/2018 14:58 EST

Where are you buying? That could influence also.

feliceB

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IMBROKE
4/18/2018 16:37 EST

I am looking at a property at Salinas Grande as well as one at Los Zorros. One is titled and one is leasehold. I seen some recent pictures of Salinas Grande and it looked like they had sand bags to stop the waves. Meaning those properties probably are not what they were when I seen them last year.

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johnchip
4/18/2018 18:09 EST

An example of my comment that when attention and sometimes entrepreneurial greed of developers are drawn to a local community. it will make some places have more issues with titles and legal restrictions. Salinas is a perfect example of this.
http://www.nicaragua.com/videos/id-362338/destruction+in+salinas+grandes+by+the+nicaraguan+riviera+sa/

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dollyd
4/19/2018 08:33 EST

I live right next to the sea and some folks from the Managua Alcaldia came to look at the swamp behind me. They told me I would never be allowed to build in this spot now. I asked what if a wave should knock down the house. They said I would be allowed to rebuild as it is already here. Anything existing can be rebuilt. That's why I say you would probably be grandfathered in. I agree, you need a lawyer familiar with the coastal laws.

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atz111
4/19/2018 21:33 EST

I remember when that happened. Was 7 years ago. Those thugs no longer around. I think the problem is complying with the law...not worrying about bandits. An awful lot has changed here in those years.

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johnchip
4/19/2018 22:18 EST

ATZ the point of bringing up the problems in Salinas is to illustrate how when for-profit developers enter the picture more attention is brought to compliance with the laws regarding real estate which otherwise would be left to lie by local communities.

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johnchip
4/19/2018 22:28 EST

ATZ, this is my very point made by this incident in Salinas that 'when for-profit developers enter the picture it does make change' to the community to be more aware of compliance with and enforcement of laws and the enhanced need for protection of their rights and watching out as to what others are doing. Most would have rather seen the sleepy village left alone.

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IMBROKE
4/20/2018 12:15 EST

ATZ111 it's the storm surges that concern me. Losing more sand would just make things worse. Possibly move in mind my own business then build a break wall.

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IMBROKE
4/20/2018 12:24 EST

John Chip I did a little research and it turns out this Rick Hilborn lives about half an hour from me.Small world. Could you fill me in a little more on this because it seems he may still have property in Salinas Grande for sale.It doesn't sound like he is someone I would want to do business with.

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johnchip
4/20/2018 13:21 EST

I know nothing more than what I read in this article. But I bet after that, he has property to unload.

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