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Retirement residency visa

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busman7
12/25/2018 09:37 EST

Is the current political situation having any effect on the granting retirement residency visas to Canadians? I am getting a severe runaround in El Salvador.

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waltermboyles
12/26/2018 07:19 EST

Not exactly to answer your question, but think twice about El Salv. & safety....We ran away from the gangs 3 years ago....And you might want to meet Daniel's successor before you move to NI...H2O 212F

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elduendegrande
12/26/2018 08:14 EST

As far as can be seen they are still processing apps for those odd people who want to be here. Expect delays as they personally investigate each applicant now.

Runaaround is a vague word, You may find the same thing here. In better times Migracion was very simple--you do things their way and they give you the residency/you don't do things their way they don't. Currently, they are looking for money and arms smugglers which were not issues in the past.

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volcan357
12/26/2018 09:12 EST

Before the protests I had been entertaining the notion of moving to Nicaragua. However stability is important, And I imagine the government is paranoid about accepting new people thinking that some of them might favour the opposition. How long is the present government going to stay in power? Are there going to be more protests? People don't like uncertainty. It is a big undertaking to move to a new country. It is better to wait and see what happens in the coming year. Maybe the situation will improve. Who knows?

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busman7
12/26/2018 09:26 EST

Thanks for the response

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busman7
12/26/2018 09:34 EST

Thanks for the quick response, that seems to be the situation here in El Salvador, they're getting back at me for not following the rules to the letter. I'll just have to wait and see what happens here, however looking for an option in the event I am kicked out of El Salvador.

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busman7
12/26/2018 09:41 EST

I have been in El Salvador for the past eight years with no problems, married a Salvadorña nearly five years ago, however, I might be forced to leave, looking for a viable option in case I am forced out.

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volcan357
12/26/2018 15:19 EST

Why don't you move to Panama ? It is more stable than the Central American countries. I have lived in Panama for 19 years. However I am thinking of moving because they won't give my wife a visa. She is from the Dominican Republic.

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elduendegrande
12/27/2018 09:00 EST

Sounds like you need to be more patient. or set your sights a little higher and move to a country with a little more potential for long term tranquility.

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volcan357
12/27/2018 12:57 EST

I think you are right. There is too much uncertainty about Nicaragua. I am thinking about either the Dominican Republic or Colombia. The is also Ecuador but I have never been there.

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busman7
12/27/2018 18:41 EST

The problem is the 75+/- cent Canadian $ making my OAS pension worth only around US$450.

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johnchip
12/27/2018 19:14 EST

I believe you need the equivalent of $600 US dollars to obtain residency in Nicaragua. (and I have no idea how a foreigner could live here on any less, if not considerably more.)

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johnchip
12/27/2018 19:36 EST

Reality dictates no country wants more poor people, they all have enough of their own. Immigration /residencies get easier when you have investments or income to spend. The poorer the country, the smaller the investment may look better. The richer the country, you better have some big bucks! Countries in turmoil will be less likely to consider other than the 'best' of the candidates. To even get a visitor Visa to the US, you better show big hometown investments that guarantee you will have reason to go back home after your Disneyworld vacation. Seems your best bets are in Canada or the Dominican Republic if you both have citizenships and you can have your marriage validated.

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busman7
12/27/2018 19:58 EST

You're correct it is US$600, My OAS + CPP = roughly US$ 740 which is sufficient to live well here in El Salvador. From what I have seen the same applies to Nicaragua, especially in an off the beaten track location.

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elduendegrande
12/28/2018 10:57 EST

$740 is tough. It is doable, but in the old fashion single pensioner rents a room and feeds pigeons in the park mode.
Boredom is the biggest problem, so why add to it with crime or political instability?

Good news is now with the internet you have some of the comforts of home so the boredom issue is less. I met one man who was here on a low disability pension and he got by borrowing books at a hospedaje's library and riding a bicycle. but right now the foreign hospedajes are deader than a door nail and chances for a quick comeback are nil.

Honduras is another failed/failing country and I have no idea what their residency requirements are, but I found Copan Ruinas to be charming which is at least 2 pegs up from anything I have found in the Segovias.

It has a world class tourist site and some other draws, and is on a main road and has a river with water in it, and buses to guate and tegu. You might want to check it out.

I believe Panama wants $1000 a month income, but you might want to verify that online.

If you don't have a bunch of stuff or personal ties, you could snow bird it. Mexico has a free 6 tourist visa. You can't beat that with a stick. If we are forced to move from Nic. I plan to spend a month in Puebla before I get sucked into anything else.

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volcan357
12/28/2018 15:09 EST

One of the cheapest countries right now is Colombia. I chat with a Colombian girl who would think that 740 a month was an absolute fortune. I mean if she had a husband with an income of 740 dollars a month she would think she was the luckiest woman in the world. And there are thousands like her all over the place. We Americans are just spoiled. That is the trouble. I don't know how much Spanish you know. I was married to a woman for ten years who never spoke English with me. As a result I can converse in Spanish almost as well as I can in English. That really opens doors for me and keeps me from being bored. In Colombia getting residency legally requires a bit of income. Colombians I talk to say I shouldn't worry about being legal. They say Colombia is a free country and nobody is going to deport you for living there. I have travelled all over Colombia and have never been required to show my passport. Once I showed my Panamanian cedula and they said nothing about my cedula being from another country. You can rent an apartment in Medellin for 100 dollars a month. Find your self a girl who will be happy to live with you so you won't be lonely. Lots of people live on 200 dollars a month in Colombia or even less. You have over three times that amount. Colombia I think is much safer than the Central American countries like Honduras or El Salvador for example. I am currently living in Panama. I am thinking of moving to Colombia or maybe the Dominican Republic. My wife is Dominican but Panama won't give her a visa even though I now have Panamanian citizenship. A bummer. I can easily get residency in the Dominican Republic because of my Dominican wife. Colombia however has a much better culture and the people are much better educated. Colombians are also very friendly. It is cheaper to live in Colombia. Much cheaper than in the Dominican Republic. Colombia is the second largest Spanish speaking country. Second to Mexico which is the largest. But in any case I won't leave Latin America. I feel comfortable where it is tropical and where they speak Spanish. It has been 19 years since I left the USA and moved to Panama. I will never return to the USA even if I get sick. I am now 77 and will probably die somewhere in Latin America. I had been thinking of Nicaragua because it is easy to drive there from where I live. An 8 hour drive. But it is probably not a good idea considering what has happened there. People in Nicaragua don't like their president It is hard to say how that is going to play out.

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busman7
12/28/2018 15:57 EST

Interesting!

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Melvinkelvin
12/28/2018 16:31 EST

I live in Nicaragua as a permanent resident. To say "the people don't like their President" is untrue. To each his own, but I would not live in, nor will I even visit, Colombia because of the government there.

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volcan357
12/28/2018 17:47 EST

Melvinkelvin.

Do you think it is safe to live in Nicaragua at the present time? I was interested in Nicaragua because unlike Panama they will let my wife who is a Dominican into the country without a visa, In addition I would be able to drive there with all my stuff instead of having it shipped by ocean freight. I don't really care at all about politics as long as the government doesn't interfere with how I want to live and they have enough control to keep people safe. And also that they protect your right to own a property so someone can't steal it from you. Would they let me apply for residency as a Panamanian citizen? As far as Colombia is concerned I don't know what kind of government they have. All I know is that I don't have any problems when I go there and that people treat me well. Colombia will also let my wife in without a visa the same as Nicaragua. I have no idea what it is like to live in Nicaragua right now. Just what I hear with the news. My wife only speaks Spanish and I am fluent so the language wouldn't be a problem for us. Anything you can tell me about living there would be appreciated since you actually live there. If I bought a house and a couple of hectares of land there would anybody bother me? Could I bring in my old Toyota Land Cruiser from Panama?

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waltermboyles
12/28/2018 17:54 EST

Life in NI now:.............Cars over 10 years old cannot be licensed in NI. Old Salvador cars can be taken to C Rica yearly for a renewal. Panama?? ........Life in NI is perfectly normal for us now. But we are all gambling on Dan's succession. Easy? Or bloody?....H2O 212F

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volcan357
12/28/2018 21:12 EST

Okay. So life is normal now but there is uncertainty about what is going to happen further down the road. My car is licenced in Chiriqui, Panama on the border with Costa Rica. So could I drive it back once a year to renew the tags? Is it expensive in Nicaragua at the present time? Can you have a bank account there? Are the banks safe? Can you have a US dollar account?

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waltermboyles
12/29/2018 07:15 EST

NI is still cheap living.
Banks tell you to be a resident first, but they open a dollar account anyway.....H2O 212F

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elduendegrande
12/29/2018 09:04 EST

Colombia offers many options, more so than the little countries here in CA.

Past practice is foreigners were not mistreated, although land confiscation of US property was a thorny issue for years afterwards. But as the stock brokers say, past practice is not a guarantee of future practice and Nic is running out of rope. Also, last time around the expats were mostly lefties who the govmint liked, now it is a more balance crowd.

Car permits are for 30 days, renewable by taking at least the paperwork out of country, a nuisance at least.

The president and his lovely wife are the most beloved couple in the country. they are also the most hated, which makes for politics!

The police force is being increased by 15% and a militia for the defense of National Sovereignty is being started next year. If that makes you feel safer, good for you.

3 of the bank atm's here no longer honor my US debit card and 4 banks have lost their US correspondent banks in the US.

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volcan357
12/29/2018 12:54 EST

I was looking on the internet for houses in San Juan del Sur and other places in Nicaragua listed with encuentro 24. Places seem to be either very expensive or very primitive. In Colombia listed with Mercado Libre and also to a lessor extent in the Dominican Republic there is a much better selection of suitable houses for sale at reasonable prices than I can find for Nicaragua. Maybe there are a lot of places available that are not listed. That could be the case. If I can figure out a way to get my wife into Panama it would be easier for me since I am a Panamanian citizen. I just don't want to waste more money on that with no results. If I could get her into Costa Rica then it would be easy since I live near the border.

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paddyoperry
12/29/2018 12:58 EST

Dude, you have been chewing this same rag for a year now, make a decision for cryin out loud.

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volcan357
12/29/2018 13:33 EST

I am in the process of selling a property here so when I have the money from selling the property I will make a decision. It is not so easy to sell a property. It takes time. Meanwhile I am looking at all the options.

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Melvinkelvin
12/29/2018 16:05 EST

There are plenty of reasonably priced rentals to be had, but you have to come here, inquire and look around. As well, most rental prices are quite negotiable, depending on how long you are willing to commit to stay.

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mate31658649
12/30/2018 11:42 EST

Volcan,
Nicaragua has MANY places for sale or rent; at very reasonable prices. The best way to find one (in my opinion) is to decide which barrio you want to live in, drive or walk up and down the streets, and take note of the "for sale" signs. Then compare several places. I suggest you rent for one year before buying. In my experience, the homes advertised in the internet are often over-priced.
Good Luck

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elduendegrande
1/1/2019 10:50 EST

ask around at expat hangouts like hospedajes as they usually have an ear to the ground.

Realize, in your favor, that many property owners are desperate. It is better to have a cheap renter than pay a caretaker a monthly fee for an empty property.

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DanielyMaria
1/2/2019 08:34 EST

Walt Boyles never steered me wrong. I would re-read his post if I were you. They still owned a home in El Salvador last I knew, but they came to Nicaragua for greater safety.

Now you are struggling to get something that they gave up freely.

Maybe you are putting in effort on the wrong project.

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DanielyMaria
1/2/2019 08:36 EST

I'm just trying to understand your reasoning. The government of Colombia is horrible enough so that you wouldn't even visit. The government of Nicaragua is just fine and doesn't bother you. Can you share the criteria that make the difference?

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Melvinkelvin
1/2/2019 12:05 EST

The government of Colombia is dominated by a combination of US influence and right wing influences. Public policy and the government agenda reflects this. The government of Nicaragua is dominated by left wing influences. Public policy and the government agenda reflects this. So, I do not visit Colombia for the same reasons I choose not to live in the US.

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DanielyMaria
1/2/2019 12:13 EST

Thanks for the explanation.

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jim42
1/2/2019 16:23 EST

LOL...…...

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volcan357
1/2/2019 23:58 EST

MelvinKelvin. It is not a good idea to judge a country by it's government. It is much better to judge a country by it's people and how they treat you. When I go to Colombia the people treat me better than any other country in Latin America that I have ever visited. In addition Colombia has been very generous in accepting refugees from Venezuela who come to Colombia literally starving to death. This in spite of the fact that the flood of refugees from Venezuela is causing major disruptions for Colombia. How can you judge a country if you have never been there? Also Colombia is not as right wing as you might think. In Medellin for example if live live in a wealthy section you pay a premium for your services. However in poorer neighbourhoods the services are much cheaper. Is that not a form of socialism?

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JustSomeGuy
1/3/2019 15:28 EST

I’m in Colombia right now. I agree completely with what Volcan357 says about the friendliness of the people, they are the friendliest I have ever heard of. I don’t know how many hands I shaken, I get invited into people’s homes for coffee, people start conversations, I’ve had a couple of little kids hug me in coffee shops. I would not have believed this had I not experienced it.

I would not want to have to try to survive on $200 USD a month. I could get by on $300/month for a while but I wouldn’t be happy about it.

I’ve been in Colombia about 9 months and have had the police check my passport twice. And not just a glance at the ID page, they checked the entry stamp. I wouldn’t want to overstay my time, I know a guy who spent 3 days in jail in Nicaragua before being deported for overstaying, I’m not going to risk it.

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busman7
1/3/2019 20:17 EST

I have invested eight years in El Salvador' my home is here with my Salvadoran wife of 4 years and 10 months, however, if I am forced to leave I have no choice but to relocate with Nicaragua being the only sensible option!

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elduendegrande
1/4/2019 10:10 EST

Volcan and busman are examples of what can happen when one has to put one's faith in a foreign government.

Even those of us who have legal residency quickly realize that it is a 5 year thing, renewable at the whim of the host government.

Just traveling with my wife is a lightweight pain going to Managua twice to get a consular visa to get permission to go on vacation. Honduras' recent retaliatory 7 day notice for Nicas is another nuisance.

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busman7
1/4/2019 11:41 EST

Incorrect, a Salvadoran "Por estar casado con salvadorña" visa, which I am applying for, gives one permanent residency after 5-years complete with DUI, voting rights plus dual citizenship with Canada, could be why it's such a PIA to obtain.

On the plus side, it sure beats the heck out of living in Canada!

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Melvinkelvin
1/4/2019 12:37 EST

Some folks want the beaches, the cuisine, the night life. Others have their own priorities.

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busman7
1/4/2019 20:56 EST

I'll settle for close enough to the beach to hear the waves breaking at high tide where the cow's pasture, good pupusas de maize con frijoles y queso, screw the nightlife!

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volcan357
1/4/2019 21:25 EST

busman7

Why are you being forcing to leave El Salvador?

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busman7
1/5/2019 07:27 EST

At this point it hasn`t come to that, however, migracion is telling my lawyer that I due to my overstaying my tourist visa I need to leave for a significant period of time.

The same happened to a neighbour who had to leave for six months before being allowed to return.

My lawyer is still working on it but it sucks bigtime!

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Melvinkelvin
1/5/2019 16:06 EST

This is an example of why I won't go to Colombia. This is not an infrequent phenomenon. Too many right wingers with guns.

https://www.telesurenglish.net//news/Colombia-Third-Social-Leader-Killed-in-First-4-Days-of-2019-20190105-0010.html?utm_source=planisys&utm_medium=NewsletterIngles&utm_campaign=NewsletterIngles&utm_content=8

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volcan357
1/5/2019 20:52 EST

Maybe so but if you take a look at Colombia's tax system it is not right wing. Actually it is quite left wing. Way more so than Nicaragua's tax system. In fact the number one reason not to become a resident in Colombia is taxes.

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johnchip
1/5/2019 22:00 EST

I am enjoying this soap opera thread. it has no meaning but to continue old news and biased opinions. Who cares where you live? Not me! You make a decision based on your comfortability, not online losers opinions. This has become a travel log of loser expats still seeking a home. "Home is where the heart is." It cannot be bought or found based on foreign economics or cheap living standards. Get a grip, Find a family. Live and love them //and then deal with the residency issues. I did. and I overcame without issue the problems you keep whining about. Maybe just it is time.,,, 'Yankee Go Home'.

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elduendegrande
1/6/2019 09:40 EST

Busman--will Nic accept you after being thrown out of another C4 country.? They are supposedly in the same customs/immigration union. The 90 day tourist visit is for all 4, not just one country. Likewise, will Sal accept you after staying in a Nic. rather than leaving the C4 area?

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elduendegrande
1/6/2019 09:50 EST

Just a footnote, your wife has many travel options if you have to leave Sal for 6 months or whatever.

https://travelfreedom.io/passport/el_salvador/

I realize your limit will be income for travel, but it seems you are at an impass with Sal.

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busman7
1/6/2019 09:58 EST

Good questions which I shall be asking my immigration lawyer this week.

It is my understanding that the CA-4 agreement was made for the ease of residents of all 4 countries ease of working in each not for outsiders. I know that each still has it's own immigration rules.

Anyway, it is only a matter of paying the $114 overstay fine when leaving El Salvador, travelling to Costa Rica then getting the first bus back to Nicaragua and applying for residency.

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elduendegrande
1/20/2019 14:44 EST

plan on flying from Sal, I suspect Nic will not let you enter by land until you go to cr and reset the clock.

c4 is a double edged sword.

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busman7
1/21/2019 13:15 EST

Dang, never thought of that, however, you're likely correct as the last time I did a visa run on Tica bus it was the last day of my visa and the bastards made me go back to the Honduras checkpoint to get an extension.

With any luck, the FMLN will be history after Feb 3 election day and ARENA will be more cooperative.

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elduendegrande
1/22/2019 11:37 EST

Also, a reminder to travelers with C.A. relatives--at least Nic and Hond are having a pissing contest with their 7 day notice game. Cost me a plane ticket to go around Anal Retentive Honduras.

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Pretzelhead
3/4/2019 18:21 EST

Ive never been to Columbia but I can tell you that you can't live on $740 US a month for 2 people. One person yes but barely.

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volcan357
3/5/2019 21:44 EST

$740 is about triple the minimum wage in Colombia. And the Venezuelans who live in Colombia work for less than minimum wage.

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JustSomeGuy
3/8/2019 22:06 EST

Pretzelhead

How were you able to work out that 2 people can't live on $740 USD in Colombia? I'm curious because I could do it if I wasn't so extravagant. $130/month gets you a nice room in a nice hotel just off the plaza in my favorite pueblo. With hot water in the private bathroom and use of the kitchen and washing machine. The hotel is expensive, but $55/month will pay the rent on an unfurnished 2 bedroom apt in a safe neighborhood on the outer edge of the pueblo. Eggs are $2.60 for 30, chicken is $3 for two full chicken breasts, legs are cheaper, rice is $0.42/pound. 15 oranges for $1, $0.30 for a good sized aguacate. I don't remember what bananas, tomatoes, and carrots cost because they were so inexpensive I didn't bother to learn.
I don't know what the gas to cook would cost or the electricity for lights but it isn't much, less than the rent anyway.
I would pay $2 every day for a lunch of chicken, rice, beans, salad, plantain and a drink, extravagant.

Folks are making $7/day and getting by.

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elduendegrande
3/10/2019 22:26 EST

Looks like Nic. just bumped it up to $1000 plus $150 per dependent.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/RealNicaExpats/permalink/2272139889664183/?comment_tracking=%7B%22tn%22%3A%22O%22%7D

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