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Small Pets in SJDS and Travel/House SItting

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mvdisonstorm
3/25/2019 11:31 EST

Hello!

I'm curious to hear from other expats on how

1. moving to SJDS with their dog/small pet and coming back into the US went

2. If there are locals house sitters/pet sitters on here that I may contact about possible pet sitting

3. Traveling to surrounding areas (costa rica, guatemala etc.) went with a small dog/ or pet

4. how your animal adjusted to the hot temperature / things to look out for

I want to bring my baby down with me but if I'm going to run into issues coming back into the US after long tourism "stay" in central america / if I won't be able to hop to another country easily with her, it may be best I try to do this expat thing alone first before bringing her.

ANY ADVICE and INFO would help!

THANK YOU
:D

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atz111
3/25/2019 12:42 EST

Generally not that hard.

How big is he dog...underseat or in a kennel?

Travel across borders is a problem. but not insurmountable.

In Granada, found lots of people to take care of the dog. But you have to be here a bit to find people you trust with the dog..

Nobody gets used to the worst of the heat. Breed?

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dturoff
3/25/2019 14:03 EST

There are costs and hassles involved, but it's certainly possible to travel with dogs and cats between all the Central American countries. Other species (e.g., reptiles or birds) are probably more difficult; I'm not sure. You can contact Lester Tapia, a veterinarian in Granada, Nicaragua; his practice is called "Orprovet", and has a facebook page. He speaks good English, and can handle all or most of the process for you

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johnchip
3/25/2019 16:24 EST

Stop the madness! Do you really want to suffer this poor pet through all the constant changes and challenges you plan to go through during your travels and explorations? Find a relative or family friend to care for your 'loved one' while you journey.

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mvdisonstorm
3/25/2019 16:54 EST

not everyone has "loved ones or family members" and plan to make it work without abandoning an animal i've had for 5 years. thanks

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mvdisonstorm
3/25/2019 16:56 EST

10 lb Pomeranian - 5 years old.

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mvdisonstorm
3/25/2019 17:02 EST

I have figured out everything with the International Travel Documents (pet passport, traveling to Nicaragua+Costa Rica+Guatemala)

I have found caregivers if needed in the area via Facebook Groups

I guess that was the best research I was going to get other than word of mouth.

Appreciate the responses. (minus the fear based comments).

Thank you for your answers

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johnchip
3/25/2019 17:42 EST

Sorry, you do not have a network of people to help you. I wish you and your pet good luck in adjusting to the variety of changes you will be putting yourself and more so, the pet through: food, diet, noise levels, exposure to other people and animals, and water changes, location and climate differences (which can be dramatic), transportation obstacles from taxi to bus services, exposure to open animal culture where few pets are kept isolated to the house or leashed but roam the streets in the days and many at night, dealing with in most parts cats on roofs day and night, finding like-minded locals who consider a pet as such a vital companion. So while you need to explore and find your interests in the local culture and possible future here, the support you feel you need may be of a higher cost on the pet than it deserves. Good luck!

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novato1953
3/25/2019 20:02 EST

Few things are more destined to get John Chip bolting down from the attic in his Rough Riders uniform, outrage in full sputter, cobwebbed hair all afrazzle, bloodshot eyes a-squint against the glare of daylight, than a visitor bringing a small dog to Nicaragua.

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dturoff
3/25/2019 21:50 EST

I usually just ignore him; he's a lunatic with rare occasional moments of lucidity.

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mvdisonstorm
3/26/2019 01:44 EST

thank you <3 I really wish I could rehome her but that's not an option and this isn't to "journey" it's to live else where

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johnchip
3/26/2019 08:40 EST

It is of no surprise to receive trash talk from those who so often offer so little on this forum. *The original posting does show a genuine question as to whether or not it is the best option to bring the dog on the first trip or to explore first alone*. As there are two sides to this coin I chose to give a 'heads up' to this point
. Having faced the same dilemma, my experience offers good insight; certainly more so than those who chose to be my critics yet do not even address the poster's question. I feel my experience offers insight into the hurdles one can expect. I defy my critics to deny any of those points is not true. My final move brought all five pets to their new permanent home. My choice to leave one and all behind during my trial runs was a wise one offering me much more freedom to do the work of the journey. But as some choose to ignore, I offered 'good luck' to the traveller and their pet.

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feliceb
3/26/2019 10:28 EST

To mvdisonstorm
You will manage. Non of us with 4-legged families or avian ones also would do anything different . we are moving down with our cats when we retire.
You will find a trusted person in SJDS..talk to Gail Anstey or Paula Demon. The Paws Cause is at Republic every Wednesday 9-12. I was thinking not for rehoming but to find a good, honest petsitter and there are and these gals would know best!

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elduendegrande
3/26/2019 14:15 EST

I have a friend who totes her poodle around in a bag made for such use. The dog is a happy camper who likes to visit.

Suggest you let your dog out for only supervised exercise. The beach would be great, just watch out for the street dogs. Our little dogs like to start fights and have to be controlled.

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mvdisonstorm
3/26/2019 18:09 EST

thank you so much! I invested in a slouch as well as a great travel carrier for her. She's small and easy to take around with me! I have been informed on US flea and tick not working in Nica and to dose her with the pill (NextGuard) as soon as I get there.

THANK YOU ALL for your responses <3 helping me ease this transition.

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