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An Expat Talks about Moving to Torino, Italy

What is the name of the city or town that you are reporting on?

Torino

Name three things that you wish you had brought and three you wish you had left at home.

What I brought:

1. Good Seasonings Salad Dressing Packets. The fresh produce is fantastic, but salad dressing is either oil, vinegar with salt & pepper, or creamy brands from France. The seasoning packets are fantastic when made with olive oil and balsamic vinegar!

2. Small cookie sheets & baking dishes: ovens are smaller.

3. A good camera to document our adventure from the beginning.

Leave Behind:

More Clothing. Relocating from the Northeast, our clothes were too heavy (even Northern Italy is mild compared with Boston--both winters are summers). Also, Italians tend to be more formal and more fashionable in their attire.

Short-Ban Radio. Never used it.

Bikes. They were stolen.

What advice would you give someone preparing to move to your area about the actual move, choosing a neighborhood and finding a home?

Keeping looking for the "right" place. Be willing to compromise on the small things. Make your home a nice place to go to when you feel overwhelmed--make sure it has your personality and is comfortable.

Don't get the TV hooked-up for 6 months. Get out and find out about the neighborhood, social groups and learn Italian!

What type of housing do you live in? Is this typical for most expats in your area?

We live in a 2 bedroom, 2 bath room apartment with 10 foot ceilings, a parking garage, elevator and doorman. It is fairly typical. Other choices to living in the city are the small hills above the city where a duplex is the norm (called Villas), or occasionally a single-family home is available.

How did you choose your neighborhood and find your home or apartment?

We used a Relocation Agent I asked the company to hire. We looked at 15-16 apartments, most of which were terrible. Landlords rent the 4-walls and not much else. Painting, repairs, lighting and installing a kitchen is up to the tenant (Ikea is the most economical for kitchens). We have only 1 car, so it was important to be on/near a public transportation line (excellent, by the way) and close in to the city.

Expats living in Italy interested in expat health insurance should take a minute to get a quote from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA. Get a Quote

Expats living in Italy interested in expat health insurance should take a minute to get a quote from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA.

Are your housing costs higher or lower than they were in your home country? What is the average cost of housing there?

Definitely lower than Boston.

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On the Italy Expat Forum

Join our Italy Forum and talk with other expats in Italy who can offer you insight and tips about living in Italy. Here are a few of the latest discussions on the Italy Expat Forum:

Italy expat forum topic
Additional Citizenship Questions (1 reply)

I read through the great writeup that MarcosM did on a previous thread about citizenship. I too will do the JS useing my GF, F, ME line. I do have two additional questions- I thought that only if you DO NOT fly directly into Italy that you need to make your presence at the Police station and tell them why you are there for JS and you may need to stay longer than the 90day allowed OR do you have to go to Police station regardless if you fly into Italy direct? I know if you fly into Italy they stamp your American passport but even if I fly direct to Italy I must go to Police Station? Which one is it? Before Residence is allowed you need your Permit to stay? - Permesso de Soggiorno?

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Italy expat forum topic
Apt Rates in Italy & shortterm (10 replies)

Hi everybody. We are leaving Las Vegas Nevada in about 2 months to as they say on this forumn to get our Italian Citizenship recognized. It will be myself and my 24 yr old daughter. We are having trouble finding an apartment for a month too month basis or at the most 6 months. We want this type of lease or rental as we will get our Citizenship then we must go back to Las Vegas for my daughters graduation from College and to wrap up some last minute business. We then want to settle in Italy or another EU country but most likely Italy. Anyone know of any companies or short term rentals that do this type of lease? If not than is 1 year the shortest? We have not decided what part of Italy we want to live in yet. Most likely central to going up North would be more ideal. Can someone tell us what are the rental prices on an apartment going for? I know it depends on the city but just an approximate? How about utilities? What would I be responsible for? Where is the cheapest rental but not in a rural area or far away from anything like train, doctor, etc? Our most concern right now is where we can get a 6month short term lease or the most 8 months. ? Links to companies or links to web pages on this topic would really help! Thank you! Good day!

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Italy expat forum topic
How to get Italian Citizenship in Italy (4 replies)

I posted something the other day & I want to followup on what steps to take to get your Italian Citizenship recognized in Italy, so basically applying in Italy vs United States. This information I was able to get not on FB but just simply googling Dual U.S. Italian Citizenship Applying in Italy. Apparently this information is from people on that forum who have applied in Italy & live their. You can also type in Applying in United States and will give you that information. So here it is what it says the procedure is, PLEASE if anyone disagrees please let me know because I will apply in Italy as well. The information I read did not indicate a date it was written. Hopefully they update it, so again let me know if it's right, wrong, missing something? ***REMEMBER THESE STEPS ARE FOR APPLYING IN ITALY TO GET YOUR CITIZENSHIP RECOGNIZED. *** "JURE SANGUINIS" Before leaving United States you must have all your AMERICAN certificates translated in Italian & Apostilled. (Birth, Marriage, Divorce, etc.) There are 8,000 Comune in Italy. You can choose which one to apply- *Note*-Larger cities are more busy & overwhelmed with applicants so don't go to a big city. Tiny cities may be faster but not cities off a beaten path as they may not be so knowledgeable. Step 1- Get a Codice Fiscal Step 2- Get yourself a place to live Step 3- Declaring Presence- Within 8 days of arriveing into Italy you must go to the Police Station called (Questura) to file a Declaration of Presence known as "Dichiarazione di Presenza". You will need to bring all your paperwork to show them you want to get your Italian Citizenship recognized. You will also need a 3x4 photo of yourself and proof you are staying somewhere in Italy. A lease agreement or letter of hospitality is required. The owner of the place you are leasing has 48 hours to inform the Questura their property is rented by you. The questura releases a document called " Communicazione di Fabbricato" you will need a copy of this document for your residency application at the Comune. The CdF is not needed if the contract was registered with the "Agenzia delle Entrate" who handles this on owners behalf. Step4- Get your Permesso di Soggiorno( PDS) ** In case it takes more than 90 days to process your citizenship you can stay longer without breaking any laws or overstay. Pick up the packet you need to fill out at Post Office it's called (kit giallo). You will fill out Modulo 1 in black ink. You also need a 16 euros stamp called Marco da bollo can purchase at Tabaccheria. The post office gives you a receipt to show for your residence. Step 5- Residency Declaration- Visit the Anagrafe office. Bring your rental agreement or letter of hospitality. The clerk will also want to see citizenship paper work at this time. The clerk will look over documents but not keep them. **Sometimes the Anagrafe clerk will not permit you to be registered as a resident unless you have the "Permesso Di Soggiorno" - PdS. ** This is why you should get a PdS beforehand. Step6- Once your residency app is accepted a Police officer(Vigile) stops by your house to confirm your physically present. Put your name on doorbell till complete. He has 45 days to visit but usually not that long. They can make up to 3 visits sometimes. Step7- Citizenship Appointment- You will give clerk documents then a completed application called "Istanza di riconoscimento del possesso dello status civitatis italiano" with a Marco da bollo ( revenue stamp) 16 euros from tabaccheria can be purchased.

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