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Expat Exchange - Public Transportation in Rabat 2024
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Public Transportation in Rabat

By Joshua Wood, LPC

William Russell
William Russell

Summary: Mastering the public transportation system in Rabat is a crucial aspect of adapting to life there. This article provides a detailed overview of the available local transit options.

Public transportation in Rabat, the capital city of Morocco, is diverse and well-developed, offering a variety of options for both locals and expatriates. The city boasts a modern tramway system, an extensive network of buses, petit taxis, and grand taxis. With these options, an expat living in Rabat could comfortably live without a car, relying on the public transportation system and walking. However, the choice to use public transportation or own a car largely depends on personal preferences and lifestyle.

Tramway

The Rabat-Salé tramway is a modern, efficient, and reliable mode of transportation. It was launched in 2011 and has two lines that cover a total distance of 19 kilometers, connecting Rabat and its twin city Salé. The tramway is safe to use at any time of the day, even at night, and is also safe for women traveling alone or children going to school. A single trip costs 6 Moroccan Dirhams, which is approximately 0.60 USD. The tramway operates from 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM, with trams arriving every 10 to 15 minutes.

Buses

Buses in Rabat are run by the company Stareo. They cover a wide range of routes, reaching even the most remote areas of the city. The buses are generally safe, but they can get crowded during peak hours, which might be uncomfortable for some people. The fare varies depending on the distance, but it is usually around 4 Moroccan Dirhams (approximately 0.40 USD). Buses operate from early morning until late at night.

Petit Taxis

Petit taxis are small, blue cars that operate within the city limits of Rabat. They can carry up to three passengers and use a meter to calculate the fare. The starting price is 7 Moroccan Dirhams (approximately 0.70 USD), and the price increases with distance. Petit taxis are safe and reliable, but it's advisable to ensure the driver turns on the meter to avoid overcharging. They are available 24/7, making them a convenient option for late-night travel.

Grand Taxis

Grand taxis are larger, white cars that operate both within and outside the city. They can carry up to six passengers, with the fare being split among the passengers. The price is usually negotiated before the trip. Grand taxis are a good option for long-distance travel or for reaching areas not covered by the tramway or buses. However, they can be less comfortable due to the number of passengers they carry.

Walking and Cycling

Rabat is a walkable city with many pedestrian-friendly areas, especially in the city center. Walking is a great way to explore the city's beautiful architecture, vibrant markets, and scenic parks. In addition, Rabat has a bike-sharing program called "Medina Bike" that allows residents and visitors to rent bicycles for short trips. The city has several bike lanes, making cycling a safe and enjoyable mode of transportation.

In conclusion, Rabat's public transportation system is diverse, affordable, and generally safe. It provides a viable alternative to owning a car, especially for expats who live and work within the city. However, comfort, convenience, and personal lifestyle should be considered when deciding whether to rely solely on public transportation or to own a car.

Expats talk about Public Transportation in Rabat

"Some areas have the tram there's bus service, which some people don't like. Taxis are cheap. If you go for a big taxi, you may have to wait until enough people jump in, going the same direction. If you hire it by yourself, it's expensive. Car? Forget it," commented an expat living in Rabat.

About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.


William Russell
William Russell

William Russell
William Russell

SJB Global
SJB Global

SJB Global is a top-rated financial advisory firm specializing in expat financial advice worldwide, offering retirement planning & tax-efficient solutions with a regressive fee model.
Learn More

SJB GlobalSJB Global

SJB Global is a top-rated financial advisory firm specializing in expat financial advice worldwide, offering retirement planning & tax-efficient solutions with a regressive fee model.
Learn More

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William Russell
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