Home Thailand Forum Thailand Guide Moving to Thailand Real Estate Healthcare in Thailand
Thailand
Resources
City Guides
JoinSign In
CIGNA Expat Health Insurance Thailand

Thailand Expat Forum

Moving my family for a mini-retirement

Post New Topic
petersen313
6/29/2014 01:17 EST

Hello all!
I am considering a mini-retirement (6 to 8 months) and wonder if anyone has some insights on a few questions:

- Does anyone have any recommendations on a trustworthy and dependable real-estate agent that we could pay to help us find a house to rent?

- What are the areas of the country that you would recommend? Low crime, reasonably affordable, and outside of the big cities would be a must. We'd like to be within a 15-30 minute drive of a nice beach (or closer if possible), and would prefer our home to be somewhat secluded if that is at all feasible. Are there areas like this in this country?

- What would be the biggest 3 or 4 adjustments that we'd have to make moving up out of the states (we live currently in Utah)?

- What is the housing like in this country? We'd be looking to rent a full house...large enough for 7 people (2 adults and 5 children) and I'm wondering if these types of homes are easy to find for rent.

- I would be able to tele-commute for work, so I'd need reliable high-speed internet? Would this be available in the places recommended?

- How hard is it to get a Visa or temp. residence permit?

- What could we expect by way of living expenses? Rent, food, etc. About how much less would the cost of living be as compared with the U.S.?

- How critical would it be to learn the language? Is it possible to get around with English?

- Is crime anything we'd want to be concerned about (more than here in the states, for example)?

- We're considering a number of countries: Panama, Belize, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Thialand, Cambodia, and perhaps Vietnam. Any insights into the pro's vs. con's of any of these?

Thanks a ton in advance!

Post a Reply

00abuse

fabien
6/29/2014 09:47 EST

you ask many questions...
please , consider to come for long vacation and visit many places in thailand , because you can find all: very busy attractive for tourists cities(hua hin, Pattaya, samui, Phuket) all expensive (not Pattaya, but this city is only for sex tourism, sea very dirty)..
you like very contry sides: isaan or north, but a little alone in cities and no sea until 600km mini
cheap, beautiful with variate coast, capital for sea food and pineapple, close to burma's boarder(15km) on the sea with security on the beaches with army place, restauants very good (max 8_10 usd) , little community european and american people, very typical, land and rent cheaper than all the coast, no risk for tsunami(gulf of thailand) ...this is what i have chosen :PRACHUAP KHIRI KHAN
you can rent or buy land or house...we are at 700m from 1 of the beaches..in coconut garden
you can stay with retired visa 6month renew 1 time, and than every year if you are more than 50 years old
connection to me : thail.fra @gmail.com
sincerly

Post a Reply

00abuse

expat health insurance from CIGNA

Choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our trusted expat health insurance partner, CIGNA. With Cigna Global Health Options, you can create an international health insurance plan that's perfectly tailored for the needs of you and your family.

Get a Quote

caughtintheact
7/7/2014 13:18 EST

My comments follow your questionjs:

Hello all! I am considering a mini-retirement (6 to 8 months) and wonder if anyone has some insights on a few questions:

• First, there are no extensions of stay for “mini-retirement” here, so if you are talking about a long vacation, then I recommend that you contact the nearest Thai Embassy or consulate to get the latest rules on which type of visas allow a stay of 6-8 months. The rules are changing on tourist visas in August , and I do not want to give you bad information. In addition your country of origin may have special rules or restrictions. You can find contact information for embassies and consulates at http://www.thaiembassy.org/main/ or just search for Thai embassies and consulates.

Does anyone have any recommendations on a trustworthy and dependable real-estate agent that we could pay to help us find a house to rent?
• It is hard to make recommendations on real estate agents without knowing where you plan to stay. I’d recommend coming here, staying in a hotel or similar until you learn your way around and then decide where to live. Then you will be better able to seek suitable accommodations. You can get information on hotels and homes, anmd apartments and conos at www.agoda.com and www.bookings.com You may even find that something like beach hotels or beach bungalows meet your needs and in many cases long term rates are available. I do not recommend making any long term commitments in advance, since what you get might not be what you want, and you will be obligated to meet the terms of any contract.

What are the areas of the country that you would recommend? Low crime, reasonably affordable, and outside of the big cities would be a must. We'd like to be within a 15-30 minute drive of a nice beach (or closer if possible), and would prefer our home to be somewhat secluded if that is at all feasible. Are there areas like this in this country?
• I do not live in or near a beach area, so I will not try to give you any specific recommendations. From what I have read lately, there seems to be a bit of a crime increase in Phuket, but that does not mean in every part of that area, and Phuket is a very beautiful beach location. Thailand has a very long cvoastline, and there are other beach areas which you might want to look into: Prachuab-khirikhan/Hua Hin, Pattaya/Jpmthien, Krabi, Rayong, are also be worth looking into. As for reasonably affordable, that means many different things to different people. The cost of accommodations and living expenses runs from very low to very high. So in any of the areas I mentioned above you will probably find something to suit your budget and other needs.


What would be the biggest 3 or 4 adjustments that we'd have to make moving up out of the states (we live currently in Utah)?
• Coming from Utah, the biggest adjustment is likely to be the weather, as this is a tropical climate. There are essentially 3 seasons, the hot season, the rainy-hot season, and the cool season, and the months n which these seasons occur depend on where you live. Temperatures range from as low as 12C (abt 54F) in the north of the country to a rare 40C (abt 104F) in some other parts of the co9untry. Air-conditioning is readily available. I’ve seen this temperature range for almost 40 years. Also, generally speaking, the sea breezes make the resort areas cooler than in the city where I live (Bangkok)
• Thai behavior is different from what you are used to at home. If you decide to make Thailand your choice of countries for this vacation, then send me a private message (PM) on this site and I will send you a paper I wrote on the Do’s and Don’t’s for Thailand. Some foreigners have a problem accepting that things are different here, and thus their behavior can get them in trouble.
• Don’t expect Thailand to change for you.
• In Thai there are no words that specifically mean “Yes” and “No”. So when you think that someone said “yes”, they may just be acknowledging that you said something, and may not even understand what you said.
• The nominal per capita income in Thailand (less than $6000/year) is much lower than in the USA, although the PPP per capita income is quite a bit higher than the nominal. This means that the Thai on average are less affluent than foreign visitors. Thus do not be surprised at two tier pricing for such things as tourist attractions.
• If you are not familiar with the Thai language, it helps a lot to learn a few phrases. The Thai like it when foreigners at least try to learn some of the Thai language, but don’t be upset if they laugh, as the Thai are generally a fun loving people. Being a tonal language, Thai can be daunting for some.
• Control one’s temper at all times. Getting angry can have unpleasant results.
• Always show respect for Thai Royalty and avoid committing Lèse-majesté
• Thailand is a Buddhist country, so it is imperative to avoid showing disrespect for Buddha images. Children need to be told in no uncertain terms not to climb on or deface images of Buddha or they will find themselves in trouble.
• Again, my list of Dos and Don’ts has much more guidance.

What is the housing like in this country? We'd be looking to rent a full house...large enough for 7 people (2 adults and 5 children) and I'm wondering if these types of homes are easy to find for rent.
• Finding a large home for rent in a secluded area might be difficult in a beach area, but you can search the web for something like Thailand houses for rent and see what you come up with. However, this is why I recommend that you send a little time in the area you want to live before entering into any contracts.

I would be able to tele-commute for work, so I'd need reliable high-speed internet?
• In many areas there is high speed Internet available, but not necessarily country-wide. Here are some of the major ISPs and you can look at their sites to see what they offer.
• A. CSLoxinfo www.csloxinfo,com
• B. True Visions http://www.trueinternet.co.th/ENG/home.html
• You can find out more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_in_Thailand

Would this be available in the places recommended?
• You would need to check witjh the ISPs for the area you select.

How hard is it to get a Visa or temp. residence permit?
• There are no temporary residence visas. If you are planning to do any business with Thailand, then you might be able to get a business visa. Other types of visas are for education and tourists. Check with your nearest consulate http://63.76.233.92/dcdp/?q=consulate_general, and there is an honorary Thai consul in UTAH (SALT LAKE CITY)
• ROYAL THAI HONORARY CONSULATE
• Administrative Office
• 8th Ave. & C St.
• Salt Lake City, Utah 84143
• Tel. 801-408-1901
• or the Thai Embassy in Washington DC http://63.76.233.92/dcdp/ for your options. Tourism is a high priority for the incumbent Thai government (The National Co0uncil for Peace and Order – NCPO) , so there may be some special offers available. The NCPO is working in close cooperation with the private sector to restore confidence in Thailand as a great tourist destination, which it was anyway, since the recent political turmoil did not affect most tourist areas.

What could we expect by way of living expenses? Rent, food, etc. About how much less would the cost of living be as compared with the U.S.?
• The cost of living in Thailand can be much lower than in the USA, but as with the USA, it depends on where you live, and the same applies here. For example, if you eat Thai food all the time, your food costs should be significantly less than od in the uSA. But Thai food is quite spicy for the most part, and thus there may be higher costs of the blander foreign food, especially when it or its ingredients are imported.
• Of you provide some examples of what your family likes, it might be easier to do a comparison.

How critical would it be to learn the language? Is it possible to get around with English?

• The main language used in Thailand is called Central Thai, and it is required for Thai throughout the country as the national language. While English is widely spoken, learning some of the Thai language will be very helpful, as fluent English speakers may not always be available. There are plenty of phrase books available at bookstores here, and it would pay to gtet a copy or two of Robertson’s Practical English Thai Dictionary before coming here. It uses an excellent transliteration system making pronunciation more accurate. http://www.amazon.com/Robertsons-Practical-English-thai-Dictionary-Robertson/dp/080480706X
• Amazon also has phrasebooks available, but they may be less expensive here.

Is crime anything we'd want to be concerned about (more than here in the states, for example)?
• This is hard to answer since crime rates vary all over the USA by wide degrees. If the crime rate in your part of Utah is very low compared to the crime rate in Washington, D.C. and/or Chicago, then expect Thailand to be mre like home in that respect. Having been here for almost 40 years, I nhave never felt unsafe or threatened in Bangkok, as long as I avoid dark lanes at night. The best way to learn about potential crime is from the expats in the area you decide to live in.

We're considering a number of countries: Panama, Belize, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Thialand, Cambodia, and perhaps Vietnam. Any insights into the pro's vs. con's of any of these?
• I have spent time in all three Asian countries, but prefer Thailand. Others may prefer Cambodia or Vietnam. And since the USA is inviting in the world illegally, some of those central American countries might find themselves begging for people to come live there.

Post a Reply

00abuse

ITSMYTIME
7/29/2017 19:03 EST

Hello Peterson313, My husband and I just decided to search out a place to spent 6 months experiencing the Asian culture. We are just wondering if you can offer an update to your experiences in Thailand as the date of your last post is June of 2014?
We are both on Medicare with BCBS supplement and wondering if you had any experience in the medical system? My husband had a heart transplant and is doing very well, and very excited at the chance to have an extended stay in Thailand. We have so many questions, and would be so appreciative for any information you might be able to offer. After reading your questions, very frankly we have much of the same concerns mostly in reference to crime, privacy and the beach. We love the beach very much but must learn about the best and safest places to live. It appears that one could live there rather reasonably in reference to rent. We decided that if we like it there we will consider permanent residency if possible. We are in the midst of selling our farm in Central Florida, and will not miss it one bit.
Again, if you can offer any information we truly appreciate it and we also thank you in advance. We trust that your experiences were all that you hoped they would be.
Blessings,
Florence

Post a Reply

00abuse

ITSMYTIME
7/29/2017 20:07 EST

Hello Fabien,

I trust all is well with you! I see that you haven't written anything in awhile, but most thankful to have read your post to Petersen313.

My husband and I are thinking about a 6 month stay in Thailand and would appreciate any information you might like to offer.

We are over 60 and he had a heart transplant last year and is doing very well. However as you would imagine we want to be close to a good hospital. We also love the beach and of course want a low crime area. We love the Thai people and their culture and of course their food so I know that we will fit in just fine. If we like it there we will consider selling our farm in Florida and get a permanent visa if possible.
Thank you in advance for any information that you may offer.

Florence

Post a Reply

00abuse

Thaihank
8/3/2017 12:14 EST

I reccomend living near a large City. Pattaya was my choice. It is considered decedent. As
long as you live outside the City and do not
participate in the night life you will be fine. I
Live 12 km South of the City in a small village.
There are only 26 houses. I am within commuter distance of the City. I have access to high speed internet. I have wifi so I can take
my I Pad outside anywhere on my property.
Because I am near a tourist area, many Thais
speak English. You do not need to know Thai.

Super markets are not far. You can buy "Western" food that is not available at local
markets. Local Markets have fresh foods. They
are, mostly, organic. Vegetables are very cheap. Most are 10 baht for a meal. There are
32 baht to a dollar, currently.

If you will not have a car, a trip into the City will
cost 20 baht on a baht bus. Local trips are 10
baht.

Cost of living is cheap. A loaf of bread is 30 baht. A large bag of frozen vegetables is less
than $2US. A kelo of pork ribs is 125 baht. That
is 2.2 pounds.

The Ocean is a 5 minute walk. I can buy fresh
fish and seafood off the fishermans boat in the
morning.

A town is 2 km away. There is a fresh market.
My Bank is there. It is very convenient. They
have an ATM.

Pattaya has a Thai Consulate. Because you do not have more than a tourist Visa. It will be
necessary to make Visa runs. A US citizen gets
A 3 month tourist Visa. There are busses that
will take you to Vietnam Nam for less than $20.

You must be older than 50 to apply for a retirement Visa. It costs about $500 for a
retirement Visa. You must show you have enough money to live on. Currently, it is 800,000 baht. or an income verified by the
US Embassy in Bangkok. They do not ask for
Proof of income.

In my Village, houses rent for 10,000 baht. That
is $320. The internet costs 700 baht a month.
There are International Schools in the area. They bus the kids to school.

Healthcare is good. There are Private Hospitals
In the City. They are more expensive but much
less than the US. I broke my hand in a fall and
had a hand surgeon put 2 plates and 9 screws
to repair it. The total cost was about $6,000 US. My supplemental insurance covered it. I
now go to the Naval Hospital for checkups. It
costs 300 baht to see a Doctor. It costs about
30% less to utilize the Public Hospital. The
trade off is you do not get an appointment. You
wait in line.

If you stay out of the City at night, crime is not a
problem.

I am looking into buying an electric car from
China. Landed cost in Bangkok is $1890 US for
an 8 passenger car. It will go 120 km on a full
charge. There will be an import tax.

I have traveled much of the World. Thailand is
where I chose to settle. I highly recommend it.

The minimum wage is 300 baht a day. That is
less than $10. You can hire a cook slash maid.

Post a Reply

00abuse

Expatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Thailand.

International Moving Companies

Moving to Thailand? Get a moving quote.


Mail Forwarding to Thailand

Mail Forwarding to Thailand.


Expat Tax

Expat Tax Preparation, Expat Tax Professionals

Join Today (free)

Join Expat Exchange to meet expats in your area or get advice before your move. It's FREE and takes 1 minute!

Cigna Expat Health InsuranceExpatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Thailand from our partner, Cigna Global Health.
Get a Quote

Culture-Shock-in-Chiang-MaiAn Expat Talks about Culture Shock & Living in Chiang Mai, Thailand

An American expat who moved from Hong Kong to Chiang Mai talks about how she underestimated the how much culture shock she would experience in Chiang Mai. She loves the welcoming Thai people, low cost of living, affordable medical care, respect for elders, Thai food and more. However, she explains that Thai culture is very complex and it's easy to make social mistakes.

An American expat who moved from Hong Kong to Chiang Mai talks about how she underestimated the how much culture shock she would experience in Chiang Mai. She loves the welcoming Thai people, low cos...

Living-in-Ao-Nang-(Krabi)An Expat Discusses Living in Ao Nang (Krabi), Thailand

Can you move to Thailand without a job? Is it easy to work remotely? An expat in Ao Nang answer these questions and has a lot more advice about living in Thailand.

Can you move to Thailand without a job? Is it easy to work remotely? An expat in Ao Nang answer these questions and has a lot more advice about living in Thailand. ...

10-Tips-for-Living-in-Thailand10 Tips for Living in Thailand

Did you know the Thai national anthem is played twice daily throughout the country? Do you know what the "Wai" is? Expats in Thailand share tips for living in Thailand.

Did you know the Thai national anthem is played twice daily throughout the country? Do you know what the "Wai" is? Expats in Thailand share tips for living in Thailand....

5-Great-Places-to-Retire-in-Asia5 Great Places to Retire in Asia

We asked expats and searched our forums for recommendations about where to retire in Asia. We pinpointed countries with affordable costs of living and have five great retirement locations. Please add your recommendations in the comments section!

We asked expats and searched our forums for recommendations about where to retire in Asia. We pinpointed countries with affordable costs of living and have five great retirement locations. Please ad...

5-Tips-for-Living-in-Bangkok5 Tips for Living in Bangkok

Expats living in Bangkok enjoy a bustling city that is the most populous city in Thailand. Over the last several decades Bangkok has become an important regional business hub for Southeast Asia.

Expats living in Bangkok enjoy a bustling city that is the most populous city in Thailand. Over the last several decades Bangkok has become an important regional business hub for Southeast Asia....

12-Expats-Talk-About-Adjusting-to-Life-in-Thailand12 Expats Talk About Adjusting to Life in Thailand

Expats in Thailand discuss adjusting to life in Thailand - customs, cultural blunders, struggling to learn Thai and more.
Expats in Thailand discuss adjusting to life in Thailand - customs, cultural blunders, struggling to learn Thai and more....

Thailand Guide
Other Links
Our Story Our Team Contact Us Submit an Article Advertising Travel Warnings

Copyright 1997-2020 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal