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Dual residency

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mamdouh
5/6/2017 17:35 EST

Hi; Retired Brasilian living in Sao Paulo, Considering to move to Montevideo gradually having homes in Both cities for a time. Please help clear my doubts:
Do I need to apply for residency in Uruguay or could I be going back and forth, say quarterly?
Can I rent or buy a home without residency?
Would it be easy to open a bank account? Pay for utilities. etc?
Thanks a lot

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carlitos
5/7/2017 13:55 EST

Ola'

Eu posso responder algumas das tuas duvidas mas aconselho vc entrar la lista de brasileiros no Uruguay do facebook.
Do I need to apply for residency in Uruguay or could I be going back and forth, say quarterly? vc pode ter residencia permanete automatica ao chegar aqui por ser brasileiro. mas pode ficar indo e vindo, cada uma das situacoes tem vantagens e desvantagens de acordo com cada um.


Can I rent or buy a home without residency? vc pode comprar, vender e alugar sem ser residente, sem problemas.

Would it be easy to open a bank account? Pay for utilities. etc? vc pode abrir uma conta no banco se quiser 'e bem facil.

O uruguai esta de portas abertas especialmente para os brasileiros.

Boa sorte.

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mamdouh
5/7/2017 19:38 EST

Muito obrigado Carlito. Noticias recentes dao conta do que p Uruguay so emitira residencias para Mecosul em 2018.

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carlitos
5/7/2017 21:43 EST

Eu nao estou por dentro das ultima noticias mas vc pode fazer quase tudo estrando como turista e a fronteira esta bem perto, para vc sair por um dia ou dois. Como turista voce pode trazer o carro e ficar andando sem problemas, ja como residente nao pode fazer isso. e quando abrir para a residencia vc ja vai estar por aqui. De residencia para a cidadania tem um longo processo que pode levar ate 5 anos dependendo do caso.
Good luck.

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mamdouh
5/8/2017 01:42 EST

Obrigado Carlitos.
Se de fato sair por alguns dias serve para renovar os 90 dias de permanencia no terretorio Uruguaio, parce nao ter necessidade de pedir residenci. Nao tenho certeza ainda em quanto tempo sairia por definivo do Brasil se sair. Deus ajuda o Brasil.

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carlitos
5/8/2017 08:39 EST

para renovar o visto de turista vc tem que sair por 24 horas. Como eu disse antes, a necessidade de ter ou nao residencia/cidadania varia de pessoa para pessoa.

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mamdouh
5/15/2017 08:17 EST

Bom dia Carlitos;Muito obrigado pelas valhosas informacoes. Estou chegandoo a conclusao que ficar no Uruguai com turista seria a melhor opcao ja qua sou aposentado e nao preciso trabalhar. Gostaria de comentario seu a respeito. Tembem ouvi das isencoes de impostos para turistas que entendo podem ser temporarias.
Muito obrigado mais uma vez.
Abracos

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carlitos
5/16/2017 21:07 EST

Hey mamdouh

I guess we should turn to the other folks in this board that have retired and moved to Uruguay and ask their opinions regarding the pros and cons of being here as a tourist as opposed to be a resident. The only real benefit I see is that being a resident will save you from the hassle of having to cross the border and stay there for at least 24h, other than that I can come up with anything else. I guess few people would say you can't bring your stuff as a tourist but this has its walk arounds. Regarding the seasonal discounts for tourists, I've never used them. For me they are like a urban legend.

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Morell
5/16/2017 21:47 EST

There are some minor drawbacks to being a permanent resident. You are supposed to switch to a Uruguayan drivers license, there are some costs involved both for that and the cedula which has to be renewed every three years.
I can't think of any specific benefits if you plan to go back to Brazil every three months or so. Would you still have medical coverage while you were here?
As long as your credit card has an out of country address, you qualify for restaurant, hotel discounts even if you are a permanent resident.

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mamdouh
5/17/2017 18:53 EST

Thank you Carlitos and Morell, Indeed having homes in two countries poses a lot of challenges and expenses. For instance I plan to have medical insurance only in Brazil and fly whenever needed. Not sure what to do in case of emergencies.

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Vortice
5/18/2017 07:20 EST

Importing a shipping container(s) with your personal belongings is very expensive without residency, no?

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mamdouh
5/18/2017 08:56 EST

Hi Vortice;
Would I have to pay duties on used cloths, I intend to rent a furnished home. I guess bringing notebook and rather large accompanied baggage should be no problem! Right?

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focus
5/18/2017 10:40 EST

No problem whatsoever. In your case, I see no reason to get residency. By the way, Carlitos, unless rules have changed, you merely need to step outside the border and return - there is no 24 wait period.

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mjferriesmcgrew
5/18/2017 11:11 EST

There is a rule on the books here in Uruguay, and I found out about it when I got YELLED at by the immigration officer in Colonia, on one of my recent "border runs". So, for all persons reading these threads advocating continued stays ( I have been one of those writers ) by doing the "every 90 days border shuffle ", be advised. = A person is supposed to apply for a cedula , after ONE YEAR of continued visits to Uruguay, even if those visits, are broken up by exits every 90 days. I dont know if they would be upset with a snowbird situation, but the officer was really upset with my stay of over 2 years ( broken up with one week visits to mostly Argentina ) ( with my passport from the UNited States I would have to spring big bucks for the Brazilian visa, and I havent felt "experimental" enough to see if a shopping trip up to the free crossing border town areas would suffice . ) I had to get a new passport last month, anyway, so I wont be as obvious anymore, as when I had multiple stamps in the old passport. But my dates are still in the computer, so if some crackdown comes down, in the future, I could hear about this rule again. ( And why DONT I have a cedula, you ask? I have been living here all this time on a soc. sec. check of $750. month - that is the only income stream that I can prove. I had been told by numerous persons to not even waste my time trying for one , on such a low income.... )

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mamdouh
5/18/2017 17:35 EST

hi mjferriesmcgrew
Thank you very much for the warning. Being yelled at is a small problem, A big problem would be if I'm not Granted entry.
Could you please check what rule and if possible the wording. A visit to Argentina for few days may be different from Brazil for a month!
Its not clear how the periods of stay would add up. Like if one visits 90 days every year would this be against the rule?
Sorry for the questioning.
Also Brazilians, as part of Mercosul, do not need a passport.
Still entries could be recorded in Uruguay's system!!

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focus
5/19/2017 10:12 EST

That's very interesting mjferriesmcgrew, thanks for sharing that. My understanding is that the immigration people want to know whether you can support yourself. It seems to me that you have shown that you can. A provisional cedula gives you two years to sort that out.

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Morell
5/19/2017 10:16 EST

I doubt someone with a Brazil cedula would have problems. There are many who have holiday homes here and visit regularly.

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MAGDALENALAZANEO
5/25/2017 14:12 EST

A partir de outobro de 2014 foi aprovada em Uruguai una lei que outorga residencia permanente a nacionais da America del Sur. Atraves dessa lei voce tem a possibilidade de receber residencia automatica en
um prazo de 90 dias uteis. Voce necesita carteira de identidade, certidao de nascimento apositiliada, atestado de antecedentes criminais.

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