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Angelhair replied to the thread ARRIVAL IN MANAGUA on the Nicaragua forum on August 01, 2015:
Angelhair initially posted:
Hi Everybody, Coming into Managua at night about 8:30 pm. What is best way from airport to town?? Have my hostel booked already. Thanks for help.
Angelhair replied on August 01, 2015 with:
Thanks for your help. Yes, think it safer to book inside airport...
Angelhair replied on August 01, 2015 with:
Thank you for your help. This taxi in airport is same as arriving in Quito, EC. Glad to know taxi is easy, since it will be evening.
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Tweetyphd posted Internet on mainland and Big Corn on the Nicaragua forum on August 01, 2015:
Any information would be helpful
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waltermboyles posted Lawyers in Jinotepe, Carazo on the Nicaragua forum on August 01, 2015:
As wild as the driving is in JINOTEPE, I hate driving to/in MGA worse. I seek a GOOD lawyer in Jinotepe, Carazo. Thanks if you can help. Walt Boyles
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KeyWestPirate replied to the thread Farming/ Ranching questions on the Nicaragua forum on July 31, 2015:
highprairiecowboy initially posted:
Good Morning to All; Anyone on the forum that is living rural, on a ranch or farm? I've been researching different Central/South American countries with the aim of moving. So far I've visited Ranches and farms in Costa Rica, but would like to explore other areas. I'm not fluent in Spanish, but am trying to learn. Any advice...or contacts would be appreciated.. Happy Trails
KeyWestPirate replied on July 31, 2015 with:
Water is defining. But it can be developed. Still, it's either there or it's not. Again, talk to neighbors. Seller is going to tell you, "plenty of water". Who wants to live around Sebaco? Flat, dirty, hot,, bad enough passing through. Plenty of other farming and ranching opportunities in the north with some altitude, clean air, and amazing views.
elduendegrande replied on July 31, 2015 with:
All year water is the make or break thing up north. See it for yourself and ask the neighbors. Also, are you into serious agriculture or just a hobby farm? The serious ag seems to be in the flatlands like around Sebaco and I betcha the land does not come cheap.
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Angelhair replied to the thread Housing?? on the Nicaragua forum on July 30, 2015:
Angelhair initially posted:
Realistic how much needed for a 2 bd, 2 bath home or apt. rental in San Juan...long term only? Granada? Will arrive Sept 15th prox to look around. Thanks for your help.
Angelhair replied on July 30, 2015 with:
Thank you for your honest reply..
Angelhair replied on July 30, 2015 with:
THANK YOU!!
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JohnSS replied to the thread Safety?? on the Nicaragua forum on July 30, 2015:
Angelhair initially posted:
Just how safe is Nicaragua these days? Also, for single female is it safe enough in San Juan. I take normal precautions Thanks for your replys.
JohnSS replied on July 30, 2015 with:
If you mean San Juan del Sur check with the ones that live here for all your answers: Expats in San Juan del Sur Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/206311666199794/
atz111 replied on July 30, 2015 with:
Its OK….live in a good area and use your head.
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bcnica replied to the thread mornin' on the Nicaragua forum on July 29, 2015:
bcnica initially posted:
just discovered this forum as i am hoping to move to matagalpa when my property eventually sells here in southern nica. been here since 2011, but time to move on. it is refreshing to see such positive and informative posts on this site, unlike others. i found an old post from 2012 stating that house rentals are few and far between in both jinotege and matagalpa. does this still hold true? thanks
bcnica replied on July 29, 2015 with:
thanks for the advice. good point about the landlord wanting me as a renter. one thing to my advantage. never rented here in nica before, but i want to check out the area before i decide if i like it enough to purchase. thanks!
bcnica replied on July 29, 2015 with:
yes, that is what i realized when the net failed to bring anything up. thanks!
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mikee2 replied to the thread Nicaraguan Baby- American Father, Nicaraguan Mother on the Nicaragua forum:
duckshel initially posted:
I am looking for information on how to handle the situation I am about to be in. I have lived in Nicaragua for the past three years and own a Condo (Since 2012 ) in San Juan Del Sur and have been in a relationship with my girlfriend for over 3 years. I found out a few months ago she is pregnant with my child and decided to come back to the States to work so I can provide better life for my child. The baby will be born next month and my ideal dream would be to bring the baby and the Mother to the United States with me after the baby is born. I would like to try and get a Visa for the mother to come back with me to the States and not get Married, but I am weighing my options now. I know what I need to do after the baby is born to get her an American Passport and would like to have the baby and the Mother to accompany me in Virginia. Is this possible without getting married? I would appreciate if anyone knows how to handle this situation. Thank you
mikee2 replied on July 29, 2015 with:
I like that, "send to Stanford", I always get a kick seeing some street bum wearing a college shirt like Stanford or USC. If only those alumni could see what their future holds, hahaha.
airportxmanaguahotel replied on July 29, 2015 with:
1. You could attempt to obtain a B1/B2 visitor visa (40% chance of her getting it) and then file an adjustment of status (I130 and I485) after you are married. She can then apply for advanced parole if she needs to leave the US and her permanent residency hasn't yet been adjudicated. We disagree with the poster that said 99% of B1/B2 visas are denied. If the B1/B2 is denied, it will have no effect on the permanent residency visa. 2. You could apply for the fiancee visa if you plan on getting married within 90 days of her entering the US. See http://www.uscis.gov/family/family-us-citizens/fiancee-visa/fiancee-visas 3. If option 1 or 2 won't fit your plans, then you must marry in Nicaragua and then apply for the residency using I-130. Note: If you try option 1, advise the consular officer that she is your baby's mother (or will be) but right now you are only interested in her visiting the United States and do not plan on being a resident. (After all, permanent residency is for people staying 181 days or more in the United States and residency applications have been denied with instructions to obtain a B1/B2 because the American plans on staying in Nicaragua and only staying in the US for a couple months per year).
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mikee2 replied to the thread TRAGEDY on the Nicaragua forum:
prpcof initially posted:
ARE WE A PART OF IT? DO WE SUPPORT THE BAD BEHAVIOR. I WILL TRY TO NOT PAY ON THE ROAD. I WILL NOT PAY IF I AM NOT GUILTY. IF I AM I WILL PAY AT COURT OR WERE IT IS DESIGNATED. I WILL TREAT ALL OFFICIALS WITH THE RESPECT EARNED OR UN EARNED I KNOW I HAVE NO RIGHT TO CRITICIZE IN THE WORKINGS OF THIS COUNTRY I AM A GUEST. THIS FAMILY WAS COMING FROM CHURCH. I STILL CAN CRY.
mikee2 replied on July 29, 2015 with:
KWP, u r so rite. Here in CR, as u no, the transito is always on the take because they are not paid very good, just like Nica. Every little bit helps. If and when I am stopped, I always take the cop off to back of the car and make an offer. I explain to him that I would rather pay him THAN jump thru the hoops on paying the ticket, it's a real hassle. He understands, he's happy and I am a little lighter in the pocket. It sounds to me that Nica. is even more of a hassle. I would definitely make an offer and explain the same. Then he would have a little something for the kitchen. "chorizo" will never go away, money talks.
KeyWestPirate replied on July 29, 2015 with:
Good description. Transito is generally respectful. There are any number of trampas they utilize to solicit a payment in lieu of the ticket. Fines can be higher than that: Not having your insurance document available is now C$2000, for example, C$4000 for "speeding", which is not really defined, leaving it to the discretion of the transito. There ARE a few rogues, Sebaco, Tipitapa, in the north, but generally it's just guys trying to get by with a paycheck that simply is not big enough. You can stand on principle, but at the end of the day,, their kids are still hungry and could use a piece of chicken. Depending on where you are, the license can be easy or hard to retrieve. If you get stopped in Managua, and you live in the north or the Carib, the cost of retrieving your license can far exceed the fine. You can usually go directly to a bank after the incident,,, La Fise works too, pay the fine, get the receipt and immediately return to the transito point, and trade the bank receipt for your license. Ask the transito if that is possible. It will save you a lot of wasted time. You might want to ask that first :), before he writes the ticket. Part of the Nicaraguan culture is to be helpful. There HAVE been numerous extrajudicial killings, and a lot of simple "beatings" recently. Most of this is associated with political protests, and will IMO increase as the Nicaraguans increasingly realize that they are not citizens, but peons working on a large hacienda owned by DO and La Chamuka that just happens to be named Nicaragua. It's widely believed,, and was reported in La Prensa that the target of the tragic ambush was not drug dealers but New Contras. The story is tragic, and today is the day that the sentences are being read. La Prensa is available on-line if you are curious.
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KeyWestPirate replied to the thread Money exchange (Canadians) on the Nicaragua forum:
ssure38 initially posted:
At 79 cents for 1 US dollar, and about 21 Cordoba for one Canadian dollar, it's not as attractive as it was for me to stay in Nicaragua. Any Canadians on here? How many Cordoba are you getting for say, $100 Canadian from the bank machine these days? What is the best deal? To withdraw in US and exchange to Cordoba or to withdraw in cordoba?
KeyWestPirate replied on July 29, 2015 with:
Euros are hard to exchange as well, outside of a few well known tourist destinations. Be aware, bank at the airport keeps its own hours and is not open Sundays. You can always pull cordobas from an ATM. If you are one of the unfortunates who has a bank that imposes fees for exchange, foreign ATM, well, get a different bank. Us dollars are accepted everywhere, eagerly, just NOT the larger denominations unless they cover a purchase. Although I have handed a taxi driver a $20 and got a smile and change. The vendors I deal with for construction materials prefer US dollars. The US dollar has been strong recently, and they know that next month they will buy more cordobas with those dollars. You will most often (read always, except maybe in Granada and SJdS) --- get your change in cordobas, and someone who doesn't have a calculator like a taxi driver will use 25 to the dollar to simplify the math. ANY change booth in ANY airport is a disaster. Look for an ATM. >>> "El Cajero ??"
airportxmanaguahotel replied on July 29, 2015 with:
As ScotiaBank is not in Nicaragua, Canadian currency is not routinely accepted. (ScotiaBank in Costa Rica accepts Canadian dollars and opens Canadian dollar accounts). It is suggested you convert to dollars before coming to Nicaragua to avoid bank foreign currency charges on the transaction. Upon entering Nicaragua, you can change some of your currency to local money at one of the banks in the airport and at most hotels. Larger businesses (La Union, Pali, Colonial, McDonalds, Burger King, Pizza Hut) accept dollars. We don't recommend using the change booth at the airport for Canadian dollars. Our hotel, and Art Hotel Managua, will accept deposits into our Canadian accounts and will provide local currency or US$ on arrival. We convert the Canadian dollar deposit to US dollars at the bank advertised rate, then convert the dollar to cordoba at the BAC bank exchange rate, then add 3% as our fee (so you lose several points). We do not charge the 3% if you are simply paying for services such as your room-- we only charge the fee if you are receiving cash. Another option for Canadians is to deposit in US$ to our US$ Canadian account, which we will change to cordobas at the BAC bank rate and then charge the 3% (again, no 3% if paying for services at our hotel).
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