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Parque Central Square in Leon, Nicaragua

Pros and Cons of Living in Nicaragua

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Last updated on Oct 04, 2022

Summary: Pros and Cons of Living in Nicaragua. Expats, Retirees and Digital Nomads talk about the pros and cons of living in Nicaragua

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What are the pros and cons of living in Nicaragua?

Expats, digital nomads and retirees living in Nicaragua responded:

"I live in Rivas, under the radar. I don't sign any documents, got a good woman who navigates/saves me $ etc. I just stay in the history use basically, TV, Internet, unprocessed food. You must be situationally aware. Don't have your head in the clouds etc. I live on a pension so, no problems. You can live comfortably on $800-1000 a month, depending on your lifestyle. Great country and great people," remarked another expat in Nicaragua.

"The people are great. It is clean and safe and has everything you need. Also great culture, gorgeous beaches, birds, etc," explained one expat in Leon.

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What do expats in Nicaragua appreciate most about the local culture?

"The loving, kind, generous personalities of all the people I've met. These people (of which there are many) were mostly bi-lingual Nica's with hearts of gold and silver. I think that's why I didn't suffer so much culture shock. I was immediately surrounded by loving / caring people," said another expat in Managua.

"I guess the depth of the new culture is what I appreciate most. Especially in the states you are conditioned to think the USA is number one in all aspects and that everyone wants to be like an American. Even in a small country like Nicaragua you find they have just as much national pride, historical richness, musical and artistical creativity, etc," remarked another in Granada.

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William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

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William Russell Health Insurance

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

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What do expats find most challenging?

"Buying things that I perceive as "necessary" like furniture, basic household stuff etc. You can't go to one store like Walmart or Target or Home Depot and get what you need and go home. It takes LOTS of time, effort and savvy to get the basics of living," remarked another expat in Managua.

"Learning the language has been a challenging but fun task. Nicaragua being a poor country, you are challenged to see things in a new perspective. You first learn there is a huge difference between being poor and having no money. You appreciate how many people live well without money and those that just seem mired in poverty. The average education level here is around the third grade and the education system is so lacking that many people just don't have a lot of common knowledge. The expats know the history here often better than the locals. Once in a while I just want to have a deeper conversation with someone without arguments. The language barrier and level of education often prevents it," explained one expat living in Granada.

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About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

Parque Central Square in Leon, Nicaragua

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