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Montezuma, Costa Rica

Montezuma, Costa Rica

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Last updated on Sep 17, 2022

Summary: Expats, digital nomads and retirees discuss what it is like to live in Montezuma, Costa Rica: Cost of living, Finding a home, Meeting People and more.

What are the pros and cons of living in Montezuma?

Expats, digital nomads and retirees living in Montezuma responded:

"Our location is beautiful. Just outside of town. Wonderful neighbors. There's been a fair amount of building construction right where we are. It's been very annoying. It was very peaceful when we first rented here. That has changed considerably. I love that we are surrounded by mango trees. I love that we have three guanabana trees. I love that we have beautiful limes growing from a number of trees. I love that I can walk five minutes and have a wonderful view of the ocean. I can hear the waves crashing against the rocks. I love our landlord and her huge compassion. People seem to think we are rich because we live here and we are gringos. :( I love that I can sit on the front porch and watch a number of species of birds flying in. I love to watch the iguanas and watusas when they come to visit. Naturally, I love this location. There is a lack of public transportation during this pandemic. Who wants to get on a public bus? I don't," said another expat in Montezuma.

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William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance in Costa Rica

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.
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What advice to expats in Montezuma have about housing?

"It's hard to find decent housing at a decent cost here. Even the house we live in, needs a lot of help. Our landlord will not fix the issues we have. They seem to be more interested in building new places to rent rather than fixing the houses for the people who already live here," said another expat in Montezuma.

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What do I need to know about living in Montezuma?

When we asked people what advice they would give someone preparing to move to Montezuma, they said:

"Montezuma, Puntarenas, Costa Rica is not Anywhere, USA that's a given. Living here is finding a new balance for your lifestyle. It totally has been for me. I see that someone has posted what not to expect. I feel that the best attitude here is not to expect a thing. There is much good that you will find here. Beautiful, fresh, and clean air. Reasonably clean ocean water. Be watchful The water here is drinkable usually. I say this because mineral content can be high. When the sign reads Rip Currents, they mean it. Truth in advertising. Very warm or hot temps with high humidity. Lovely fruits and vegetables at very reasonable prices. Clothing minimal. Tshirts/shorts and sandals most of the time will do nicely. No need to wear expensive anything - it doesn't fit the terrain. Friendly people. There is internet service and cable television depending on where you are in Montezuma. The power will go out and yet, it does come back on. If you don't mind taking the bus from Montezuma to Cobano where Banco Nacional is located along with its outside ATM's, all two of them at the main office, it will only cost 400 colones. There's cost efficiency for you. If you love nature this can be a paradise. Every day is an adventure. You can be negative about things here, you can be positive about things or you can just be. I prefer to be. Pura Vida," remarked another expat in Montezuma.

"Be prepared for a lack of resources in almost every department. You are not going to find Walmart right around the corner and Starbucks will not be on every street. Yes, you can get used to it. You'll often find what you need; although it might be an alternative. Learn to live simply. Learn to live with space not things. Be prepared to pay a lot of money if you want to ship things here or to home. Be prepared for the rainy season. Be prepared for a lot of insects. Be prepared for humidity. Be prepared for crappy roads, many dirt and rocks. Be prepared to see people driving all over the road. Be prepared for your electronics to fail. Be prepared to meet a lot of wonderful people. Be prepared for illegality of cannabis; especially for those who have medical cannabis certificates in the States. Be prepared for the electricity to go out. Be prepared to travel 7km, one way to obtain gasoline for your vehicle. Be prepared to breathe fresh air. Be prepared for a lot of sun. Be prepared to see things that might appear alien to you - often. Be prepared to kiss women on the cheek when you meet them. Be prepared to learn what is truly important in life. Be prepared to let go and breathe," explained one expat living in Montezuma.

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How do I meet people in Montezuma?

When we asked people living in Montezuma about club and activities where newcomers can meet others, they responded:

"None are necessary to meet others here. It's very easy to interact with others in Montezuma. Heck, just walk into Mega Super or walk down to the beach or take a break in the park. Getting involved at the Turtle sanctuary would be good. Take a Spanish class, or a yoga class or get involved with animal rescue. You'll meet plenty of people," added another person living in Montezuma.

"If you know how to play an instrument, I recommend volunteering your time with the SINEM children's orchestra, a lot of expats teach in this program all through out Costa Rica," explained one expat living in Montezuma.

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William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.
William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance in Costa Rica

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.
GET A QUOTE

Will I be able to find a job in Montezuma?

When we asked people about industries and career opportunities in Montezuma, they reponded:

"Tourism of course is huge here. I do not see a lot of career opportunity for people coming from other countries," remarked another in Montezuma.

"The main industry here is tourism. most people moving here start there own business or end up working for a pre-existing one or...teaching English for one of the many schools in the area," explained one expat.

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What is life like in Montezuma?

When we asked people living in Montezuma what life is like and how people spend their time, they said:

"Lots of socializing, soccer, swimming, surfing, fishing, picnics on the beach, hiking, photography. Living life seems to be the priority here. Pura Vida," said another expat in Montezuma.

"MONTEZUMA, LIFE DOWNTOWN - After living in Montezuma officially for the last year I look upon it with a deeper understanding, similar to the way one stares at art with new eyes once enlightened by one or two art history classes. When i first moved here it was for six months during the high season so I was able to camp, then as i started to put my roots down i realized the camping lifestyle could only work for the dry season and i would have to move to level two; the house and all the trappings that come with that. Then the job; starting a business downtown and teaching/ studying music, slowly becoming part of the community. Thus bringing me back to seeing more now than i ever did my first month here as a tourist, innocence is lost but the luster still abounds; Montezuma changed my view and approach towards life and how I was leading it, somehow coming face to face with nature so wide, pure, and vivid revitalized me and for that I am forever indebted to this proud little coastal village. What can one say about living here? One of the first things you'll noticed is that this is a "town" in the truest sense, classically so, like the set for a play or Sesame Street or like it was back in the states 100 years ago. This is a positive tight-knit community, where it's easy to know everyone's name in one week, and yet very open and welcoming to new characters on the scene (enter me and my boyfriend, who believes he'll be mayor by the end of the year!) planning on sticking around and becoming part of something great. And then there's the dogs. A great bumper sticker idea: "Costa Rica where every house comes with two dogs" would be a as popular as beanie babies here...because it's true . They usually belong to the cabina owners but dogs here are free so they basically decide where they want to live and with who...[ for more articles on Montezuma please check out our website: paraisopublicidad.com or find us on twitter and facebook for daily updates!]," remarked another in Montezuma.

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What do expats find most challenging?

"Roads can be terrible, power outages, language, keeping electronics working, trust, purchase and shipping of goods, getting use to what I consider rude behavior, ie people cutting in front of me in lines," explained one expat living in Montezuma .

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Is there a lot of diversity? Are people in Montezuma accepting of differences?

If you live in Montezuma, newcomers to Montezuma would love to hear your answer to this question.


"The people here are quite diverse in terms of all the above. Accepting of differences: Yes to an extent. I have noticed racial bias. There often will be a local price and a gringo price. It's not that gringos are treated badly, it's more a double standard," added another person living in Montezuma.

"Folks here are very diverse, you feel like you've found you home once you arrive," explained one expat living in Montezuma.

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About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

Montezuma, Costa Rica

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