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Parent's Review of St. Stephen's School in Rome, Italy

What is the name of your child's school? (Please report on one school per survey.)

St. Stephen's School

In what town or city is this school located?

Rome

How would you describe this school? (i.e. American, British, International, Local, etc.)

International

What grade levels are represented at this school?

9th - 12th

How do most children get to school everyday? (bus, train, walk, etc.)

Most of the students are living locally, and either walk or take a city bus, however, there is a good boarding option.

How would you describe the facilities at this school? What extra-curricular activities are available?

The school grounds are lovely. There is outdoor space and the classroom and meeting areas are updated. There is no official sports program offered.

The boarding accommodations in the school building are very nice. Teachers live with the students and they are well supervised.

Students may graduate with a good foundation in Italian as well as another language, if they choose to take the available optional instruction, but all other classes are taught in English.

There are many opportunities for the students to participate in after school activities, and there are travel opportunities during the school year as well. The options for travel are extensive both in Italy and elsewhere. Each year different locations are offered.

Art history classes are available that take advantage of the school's setting in Rome, but there is surprisingly little available in the way of studio art.

There is a small dance program available, however, the music and theater options could be improved.

What has this school done to help your child transition from the curriculum in your home country into the curriculum in your new country? Are there programs to prepare your child for repatriation?

The curriculum is based on both the English system and the American system. The requirements are similar, so repatriation is really not an issue.

There is a full-time college adviser on staff. Graduates go on to university systems throughout Europe, England and the U.S.

Arrangements are made for students to take the SAT's for U.S. placement and the GCSE's and A Level tests for the English system.

How would you describe the social activities available for parents through this school? Are there parent-teacher organizations?

There are regular parent-teacher meetings and teachers are available throughout the school year. There is a continuing effort to provide more social activities for parents throughout the year.

What advice would you give to someone considering enrolling their child in this school?

I definitely recommend this school and believe that the academic level continues to rise with the appointment recently of a new head of school. The school is well run and financially stable.

It's a good idea to have your child visit if possible, especially if you seek a boarding situation. There are several other good options for high school, but St. Stephen's and Marymount are the ones closest to the historic center, St. Stephen's having the most convenient location within walking distance.

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