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Expat Exchange - Homeschooling in Argentina
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Mar del Plata, Argentina


Homeschooling in Argentina

By Betsy Burlingame

SJB Global
SJB Global

Summary: If you're moving with kids to Argentina and homeschooling is something you're considering, it's important to do your research and learn about homeschooling in Argentina.

Argentina, a country known for its rich culture, vibrant cities, and stunning landscapes, is also a place where education is highly valued. The country's education system is well-structured and comprehensive, but what about alternative forms of education like homeschooling? Homeschooling is a growing trend worldwide, and Argentina is no exception. This article will delve into the specifics of homeschooling in Argentina, focusing on its legality, prevalence, requirements, resources, university admissions considerations, and the pros and cons for expat families.

Is it legal to homeschool in Argentina?

Homeschooling in Argentina is a grey area. While there are no specific laws prohibiting homeschooling, the Argentine National Education Law states that education is compulsory for children between the ages of 6 and 14. This law does not explicitly mention homeschooling, leaving it open to interpretation. For foreign residents or expats, the situation is similar. There are no specific laws that either allow or prohibit homeschooling, making it a decision largely left to the discretion of the parents.

Is Homeschooling common in Argentina?

While homeschooling is not as common in Argentina as it is in some other countries, it is slowly gaining popularity. The exact number of homeschooling families is unknown due to the lack of specific regulations and reporting requirements. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that more and more parents, both locals and expats, are choosing to homeschool their children for a variety of reasons, including dissatisfaction with the traditional education system, flexibility, and the desire for a more personalized education.

What specific requirements are there for homeschoolers in Argentina?

Due to the lack of specific laws regarding homeschooling, there are no set requirements for homeschoolers in Argentina. However, it is generally recommended that parents follow a curriculum that aligns with the Argentine National Curriculum to ensure their children are learning at the same level as their peers. Additionally, parents may choose to have their children take standardized tests to demonstrate their academic progress.

Are there groups or resources for families who homeschool in Argentina?

Yes, there are several resources available for families who choose to homeschool in Argentina. Online communities and forums provide a platform for parents to share experiences, advice, and resources. Additionally, there are homeschooling cooperatives and groups that organize activities and field trips, providing socialization opportunities for homeschooled children.

What should homeschooling parents take into consideration for university admissions in Argentina and internationally?

For university admissions, homeschooling parents should ensure their children meet the specific requirements of the universities they are interested in. This may include taking specific courses, standardized tests, or obtaining a high school equivalency diploma. Internationally, requirements can vary greatly, so it's important to research each university's policies. Some universities may require additional documentation or assessments for homeschooled students.

What are the Pros and Cons of homeschooling in Argentina (for expat families)?

Homeschooling in Argentina offers several advantages for expat families, including flexibility, the ability to incorporate travel into education, and the opportunity for a personalized education. However, there are also challenges. These include the lack of specific regulations, potential isolation from local culture and language, and the need for parents to take full responsibility for their child's education. Additionally, the grey area of legality could potentially lead to complications with authorities.

About the Author

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.


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Mar del Plata, Argentina

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