Expat Exchange
Free MembershipSign In
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Living in Argentina

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Last updated on Feb 03, 2023

Summary: People describe life in Argentina as vibrant and exciting. Expats love the culture, the food, the people, and the beautiful scenery. The cost of living for an expat in Argentina is relatively low compared to other countries. The average cost of living for an expat is around $1,500 per month. The population of Argentina is approximately 44.5 million people. The largest cities in Argentina are Buenos Aires, Cordoba, Rosario, Mendoza, and La Plata. The cons of living in Argentina include high inflation, a weak economy, and a high crime rate. Additionally, the cost of living is increasing, and the infrastructure is not as developed as in other countries.

AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers

What do I need to know about living in Argentina?

When we asked people what advice they would give someone preparing to move to Argentina, they said:

"Before retiring in Argentina, you should research the country's laws and regulations, cost of living, housing market, and healthcare system. Look for health insurance options and find out about the pension system. Consider what type of visas and residence permits may be required and understand the need for necessary documentation. Look into banking and tax laws to ensure compliance, and find out about any taxes you might need to pay on income earned outside the country. Finally, familiarize yourself with local customs and language so you can feel more integrated into the culture," explained one expat living in Argentina.

"Make sure you have a stable income in the currency of your home country. If you are from the US or Europe, your money will go far. You can eat out everyday affordably. The city has a lot of offer in terms of culture and it is a wonderful "walking town". Great architecture. There is always something to do. The neighborhood of Palermo Soho is fantastic with a mix of people, tons of restaurants, parks, and shopping. This city has a very European feel at a budget price," said another expat in Buenos Aires.

Answer Question & View More Answers

PassportCard Introduces an innovative approach to expat and digital nomad health insurance with no out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it. Outstanding service validated with more than 2 million customers for over 20 years. Get a quote from our partner, PassportCard.
PassportCard International Health Insurance

PassportCard Introduces an innovative approach to expat and digital nomad health insurance with no out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it. Outstanding service validated with more than 2 million customers for over 20 years. Get a quote from our partner, PassportCard.
GET A QUOTE

How do I meet people in Argentina?

When we asked people living in Argentina about club and activities where newcomers can meet others, they responded:

"One of the best ways to meet people in Argentina is to join a local expat community or to volunteer with a local organization. Socializing at local bars, restaurants, and cafes is also a great way to meet people. Other popular ways to meet people in Argentina include taking part in local events and activities such as festivals, classes, and concerts. Joining a sports team is also a great way to meet people in Argentina. Lastly, joining a language exchange program is a fun way to foster cultural exchange and create new friendships," explained one expat living in Argentina.

"Expat newcomers group. There is a small English speaking Christian community. Join a gym. You have to make and effort on your own to meet "locals". They will warm up to you if you make the first introduction," said another expat in Buenos Aires.

Answer Question & View More Answers

PassportCard

PassportCard Introduces an innovative approach to expat and digital nomad health insurance with no out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it. Outstanding service validated with more than 2 million customers for over 20 years. Get a quote from our partner, PassportCard.

Learn MoreGET A QUOTE

PassportCard

PassportCard Introduces an innovative approach to expat and digital nomad health insurance with no out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it. Outstanding service validated with more than 2 million customers for over 20 years. Get a quote from our partner, PassportCard.

Learn MoreGET A QUOTE

What is life like in Argentina?

When we asked people living in Argentina what life is like and how people spend their time, they said:

"Living as an expat in the area can be both exciting and challenging. Expats will find themselves immersed in a culture that is drastically different to their own home countries, though language barriers are not unmanageable. Expats can find a range of activities to do and places to visit in the area, with its diverse natural panorama, historic buildings and monuments, and various festivals. The people living in the area are friendly and generous, although they may remain reserved at first. Expat residents generally need to make an effort to build relationships with their new neighbours, which can aid in making the transition smoother. Additionally, there are plenty of activities and clubs which expats can join to make new acquaintances and have a better understanding of the culture. Lastly, living costs in the area are relatively low compared to cities in other parts of the world, and health care services are of a high standard," commented one expat who made the move to Argentina.

"Food!!! There are thousands of restaurants! The other major issue is how to survive financially. The peso devaluation makes it impossible to live on, so expats want to work on line and get paid in dollars or euros. The work at all crazy times of the day here and eat dinner very late ...like 9 or 10pm. It is a very European lifestyle with a coffee break around 5pm. They love their football (soccer) here. Lots of holidays too," remarked another expat living in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Answer Question & View More Answers

Quickly and easily find trusted moving, insurance, relocation and other providers with Expat Exchange's Moving Planner. Select which of our trusted partners you would like to hear from and we'll do the rest.

Get Started Now

Quickly and easily find trusted moving, insurance, relocation and other providers with Expat Exchange's Moving Planner. Select which of our trusted partners you would like to hear from and we'll do the rest.

Get Started Now

Is there a lot of crime in Argentina?

We asked people if there is a lot of crime. They answered:

"Crime is a problem in Argentina, with a high rate of homicides, burglaries, and robberies taking place in some areas. Overall, the country has seen an increase in crime in recent years, but most cities remain relatively safe. Tourists are advised to take necessary precautions when visiting Argentina, particularly in the larger cities such as Buenos Aires," wrote a member in Argentina.

Answer this Question

Is there a lot of diversity? Are people in Argentina accepting of differences?

"In Argentina, diversity is embraced, and there is a culture of respect and acceptance of all people regardless of ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation. The country has a long history of multiculturalism, with descendants of Europeans, Amerindians, and African slaves living harmoniously. Argentina is a nation of immigrants, and over the last few decades, the country has welcomed and continues to receive large numbers of immigrants from across Latin America and around the globe. Although there are still areas of the country where diversity is not as accepted as it should be, Argentina is generally a very welcoming and open-minded nation," commented one expat who made the move to Argentina.

"The city is diverse but not as diverse as most. Many Venezuelans are now here. There is a large discrepancy between the rich and the poor. In general, they are not extremely friendly to outsiders in Buenos Aires. There used to be lots of Americans living here, but not as many anymore. You really need to know your Spanish here," remarked another expat living in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Answer Question & View More Answers

PassportCard Introduces an innovative approach to expat and digital nomad health insurance with no out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it. Outstanding service validated with more than 2 million customers for over 20 years. Get a quote from our partner, PassportCard.
PassportCard International Health Insurance

PassportCard Introduces an innovative approach to expat and digital nomad health insurance with no out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it. Outstanding service validated with more than 2 million customers for over 20 years. Get a quote from our partner, PassportCard.
GET A QUOTE

What are the schools in Argentina like?

"Argentina's public schools are run by the national Ministry of Education and offer free education. Argentina's public schools use the Argentine National Curriculum, which is modeled on the European system. Schools generally follow a set pattern which includes primary, secondary, and higher education. Schools in Argentina are characterized by a strong emphasis on learning Spanish, math, and science, as well as the study of the arts and humanities. Most schools also offer after-school activities such as sports, music, arts, and religious classes. Private schools and international schools may have different curriculums and often offer different activities than those in the public schools. In addition, many students attend universities in Argentina which offer education in more specialized fields such as engineering, medicine and law," commented one expat when asked about in Argentina.

"Its considered one of the best schools in Mendoza, at the high school level, the second half of classes are taught in English solely," remarked another expat living in Mendoza with children attending Colegio San Andres.

Answer Question & View More Answers

Is the cost of living in Argentina high?

We asked people how much they someone comfortably live on in Argentina, they wrote:

"The cost of living in Argentina varies depending on the city and location, but in general it is considered to be moderate when compared to other countries. Prices are generally lower for groceries and other essential items, and somewhat higher for luxury items," commented one expat who made the move to Argentina.

Answer this Question

About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

Buenos Aires, Argentina

PassportCard International Health Insurance

No out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it.
GET A QUOTE

PassportCard International Health Insurance

No out-of-pocket expenses, no paperwork and no long claim processing, facilitating payout on the spot when you really need it.
GET A QUOTE

Contribute to Argentina Network Contribute
Help others in Argentina by answering questions about the challenges and adventures of living in Argentina.

AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers

Copyright 1997-2023 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal