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House Sitting: Try Before You Buy Abroad

By James Cave

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Summary: If you're considering a move abroad, it might not be the best decision to sell off all your assets only to find out that expat life isn't for you. Thankfully there's a way to try before you buy: house sitting.

House Sitting  - Try Before You Buy Abroad

Moving abroad is a dream for hundreds of people, but it can quickly turn into a nightmare if you buy a house in the wrong location. Although there are plenty of people who move abroad and never look back, the internet is full of horror stories about people who regret their move and wish that they'd stayed in the UK.

If you're considering a move abroad, you might be unsure about which camp you're going to fall into. You shouldn't let the horror stories put you off, but at the same time it might not be the best decision to sell off all your assets only to find out that expat life isn't for you. Thankfully there's a way to try before you buy: house sitting.

I'm speaking from experience, of course. My partner Jemma and I had always dreamed about buying and renovating a big ruin in the middle of the French countryside: a romantic idea that tempts lots of people. We discovered the idea of house sitting one day, and thought it would be a good way to find out if life in France was really for us.

House sitting is different from staying in a hotel or B&B because you're slotting into someone's life. There are dogs that need walked, errands to run, and neighbours to chat to. After browsing through a number of house sits, we finally found one that suited us perfectly on TrustedHousesitters.com: Six months in a partially renovated farmhouse, in a small village in the Midi Pyrenees. We're glad we applied, because the house sit was a wonderful experience. We learned some tips from the English expats who lived nearby, we got to attend a hunter's dinner (usually reserved for people who live there), and we had the chance to really immerse ourselves in local culture.

At the same time, we learned that living in a big country house in France really wasn't our style. Although at first it was lovely and quaint, it soon became tiresome having to drive for 20 minutes just to reach the supermarket. Because the house was so large, hoovering became a two day event. We were finally able to put together a picture of our dream house; something smaller, in a more urban setting.

If you're thinking of moving abroad and already have an area in mind, it's a good idea to look for long term house sits. Even if you just use the home as a base for a two week holiday, it's definitely a better way to get the measure of an area and the people who live there. If you house sit frequently you can even build up acquaintances in the expat community; so you'll have your own friend network when you finally do decide to take the plunge, and they can help you to settle in.

Living abroad can be fabulous; you owe it to yourself to make sure it is.

About the Author

James travels and house sits with his partner Jemma. You can read more about them on their house sitting profile or follow their adventures on their blog, The House Sitting Couple.

CIGNA Expat Health Insurance

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Comments about this Article

JMM123
Sep 27, 2013 07:25

This is a great article. I just posted about buying property--not in France, but elsewhere, and as an investment vehicle--and was told to live in the country for a year before I bought owing, mainly, to ethics issues related to real estate purchases in the country in question. Living in the country in question for a year before I bought would be difficult for me to do given visa restrictions. House sitting, however, would be doable. At least for three months. Which leads me to an important query about your article: Were I to do this in France, I would be similarly restricted to a three month visa. Or would I? Can one get an extended visa if one gets the home owner's cooperation? Did you, as an EU citizen, face any visa restrictions regarding the amount of time that you could housesit? I am setting up an extended volunteer experience or experiences in France for the coming year for the same purpose that you have posted on--seeing about moving and wanting a few "realistic" experiences to back up my decision. It would be super to combine a volunteer experience or two in one or more parts of France with a house sitting experience in yet another. I would just need longer than three months to do all of this.

First Published: Jun 23, 2013

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