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Middle-aged Americans thinking of retiring in Bulgaria. Anyone else?

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trixie1127
3/18/2018 13:45 EST

My husband and I are New Yorkers, due to retire in about 8 years. We are thinking of moving to Bulgaria once we do, to one of the big four cities. Any other Americans out there in the same boat?

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ronhaddock
4/2/2018 16:11 EST

My wife and I plan on retiring in the next few months, as soon as paperwork and visa documents are complete.

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rbarbree
4/15/2018 03:29 EST

I am an American that has lived overseas for about eight years now. I married a Bulgarian citizen six years ago & have been coming to the country ever since. We have bought a property outside of Sofia (the capital) this year & plan to retire there in the summer of 2019. The community that we are moving to is a golf course/resort. I feel really happy about our decision to move there because we are close enough to Sofia to get there as needed, but far enough away to have a quiet beautiful spot to live. Let me know if you have any additional questions.

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coollaw3
4/15/2018 09:42 EST

Good morning,
I am always a positive thinking individual,but before moving to Bulgaria I asked myself several questions:
1.The true cost of living there versus the USA-the research shown that the same cost of living can be easily achieved in the US.
2.Health insurance-medicate can not be used abroad.The reliable medical insurance provided by Cigna ,Bupa,Aetna would cost about $700 a month,what is much more than in the USA.
3.Bulgaria is still a 3rd world lifestyle.
So,why to move?The USA is still number one according to my perception.How about the retirement for your Bulgarian citizen spouse over there?
Sincerely,
Chris

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trixie1127
4/15/2018 14:30 EST

Thank you, Ron. That sounds lovely. As we are used to living within 15 minutes of NYC, I totally get the benefits of living close to the capital, but just outside it. We are going this June for the first time, to take a spin and look around. If I have questions, may I message you privately? Best, Olga

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ronhaddock
4/16/2018 10:13 EST

I have lived all over the United States and yes you can find places that you can match the cost I living, maybe. I haven't found any I want to move to.
I live in Columbia, MO and it is 41% cheaper to live in Burgas, Bulgaria than here.
If the only reason you are moving is to save money, then don't. You don't get it. I have been in over 50 different countries in my lifetime. You have to find the reason you are willing to move to a completely different country. You have to be adaptable.
Can you handle the culture shock?
I have used medical facilities in many different countries and I actually find many good things about them. I really do not like American Medical, for many different reasons, but this is a judgment call. Everyone situation is different. What you see at the $700 is just what is shown on the internet and advertised to your browser. In country the costs and value is much different and much better.
Well your idea of a 3rd world country may be different than mine.
USA, number 1 country. I agree from a nationalistic and patriot point of view, but in so many categories, they are not.
Bottom line... If you have not travelled to other countries and see the differences upclose and had experiences, then you really only have curbside knowledge and nothing to back it up.
Everyone has to decide what is important to them in where they live and what is a dealbreaker so they don't move.
Some People should not move as they are not adaptable enough.
Usually if you travel enough you will find you are the guest and it is a matter of neither good or bad just different.
Traveling usually means finding out that everything your friends told you about that country was wrong.
Safe travels..the answers are not on the internet.. they are in the experiences and people you meet.

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coollaw3
4/16/2018 12:27 EST

Good morning,
I can consider an experienced traveller since my h.s.junior year.
At this time I have no intention to be involved in any kind of dispute,but simply educate myself of other people experiences. I will be glad to learn something I do not know yet.
1.Cost of leaving-many cities not far then 1.5 hour drive from Chicago will charge very low property taxes ,short distance from first class medical facilities and theatres and operas.Lunch for two in a middle class restaurant including a large pizza and two glasses of merlot cost $25.
2.I was looking for a sufficient medical insurance in Bulgaria without a success.Quality of hospitals and medical staff are questionable.Sooner or later all of us will need them.
3.What is better in Bulgaria then in the States?Please let me know the reason why people move abroad except some emotional and other individual preferences ,including political dissatisfaction or unemployment related to lack of qualifications and education.
You are warmly welcome to e mail me if you wish:
Have a great week.

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zsholtis
4/16/2018 18:16 EST

Couldn't say better. Thanks

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coollaw3
4/24/2018 09:21 EST

My pleasure.It is a reality.Definitely,it is a very nice to live in the world of our dreams,but this kind of happiness expires very soon, unfortunately.

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rbarbree
4/28/2018 04:19 EST

Everyone will have their own priorities & views on why to move one place or another. I have lived overseas for around eight years & I find it comfortable to live outside the United States. That doesn’t mean that there are many things that I do miss about being back in the US. Each person needs to look at what is important to them & strive to find that lifestyle. I have many friends & family members that don’t understand why I live overseas, & that’s okay. I just try to find a place that would provide a lifestyle that we would enjoy. I found it in Bulgaria. Good luck on your journey.

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Joshuak
4/28/2018 15:34 EST

I am a "Dual" US - Irish citizen so I can live anywhere in the EU without a problem. I have lived in Ireland for about 1 1/2 years but only to use it as a base to travel to other European countries. We had visited Ireland numerous times before that. I still have relatives operating a farm near Bantry Bay. In addition, I have spent months in Romania and a bit of time in Bulgaria. I would suggest one could live there cheaply, but there is always a price to pay perhaps in the culture and availability of quality healthcare at a reasonable price and competence. It seems many of the people that dream about moving to Europe from the US are people either approaching retirement, or retired. As we age, medical becomes important and Bulgaria may not be the best for your medical treatment if you sometime require it. I would suggest anyone thinking about moving not "Burn their Bridges" behind them and leave a substantial amount of property or assets back in US as you may wish to return. At least for a period of time when you determine if that lifestyle is for you. I find the best way would be to rent for at least a year before you make any lasting decision. Bulgaria is a nice place to visit, but maybe you need to ask some Bulgarians why they decided to move to the US, and only now go back to visit relatives. My primary care Doctor is from Bulgaria and she returns for 1 - 2 weeks a year, but her idea of retirement is here in US. The US is still the place many others would like to live and they are out there trying to get here.

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trixie1127
4/28/2018 17:58 EST

Thank you, Joshuak. How does your dual citizenship work, tax-wise? Do you pay taxes to both Ireland and the US, or do you get to pick one?

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Joshuak
4/29/2018 07:58 EST

Taxes can be complicated issue. For Ireland, in most cases you will only have to pay in US or Ireland, not both. They have a bi-lateral treaty, but only a tax attorney may be able to answer that question in full. For Bulgaria, they seem to have about 10 % flat tax on world wide income with employer paying a larger amount on local income. There is also another 2.9% social tax. The VAT is also there at 20%. I am not sure if there is any treaty with US or not.

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curiouscat1
5/13/2018 06:11 EST

Why in the world are you posting in an expat site if you don't want to be an expat and worship Trumpland (formerly referred to as America)? This is totally bizarre, but par for the course for the stupid fools that reside in the US now. Seriously, and why Bulgaria? Bizarre.

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coollaw3
5/23/2018 06:37 EST

I decided to post because I want to.The USA under President Trump is going to great again,BTW. I love this country.Simple.

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RaulPinde
10/27/2018 16:30 EST

Hello,
My wife and I are considering moving to BG, too. I retire in 4-5 years. We currently reside in Kansas City, MO. We are considering Burgas and communities further south. If you care to chat, please reply.

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Joshuak
10/28/2018 12:07 EST

You don't mention if you have "dual" citizenship in any EU country. Having that makes moving there much easier, I have been told it is also possible to get citizenship without that, but you may have to "Jump through many hoops" before that can happen. Another thing you need to consider is healthcare. Since you talk about retirement, which usually indicates older age, which also statistically means more possible ailments requiring sophisticated medical intervention which may or may not be available in Bulgaria at US proficiency levels. Just because Bulgaria has a low cost of living does not always mean it is suitable for non Bulgarian speaking people of older age to move there. The only real solution is to visit there for 2 or more long vacations and get a feeling if it might work for you. And if you do decide to move, do not "burn your bridges" back in the US behind you. Only move for possibly a year and rent so you get a good idea if it is what you want. lots of Americans wanted to move to Ireland as of course they also speak English, but now Ireland has become the 3rd highest cost of living in Europe due mostly to cost of housing.

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RaulPinde
10/28/2018 13:34 EST

We traveled to Bulgaria several years ago and did some exploring. I have also researched the temporary stay visa and having that renewed as needed. Our plan would be to rent for a year or more and then, if all is acceptable, make a purchase. I am not sure what you mean by burning the bridges in the US by relocating.
Health care is important and BG has public and private medical providers. We will both have health insurance and we are in good health, though of course, that can change, we will also have the flexibility to fly to another locale for medical care, as needed.

What I am interested in now is f there are any expats Burgas and parts south.

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trixie1127
10/28/2018 14:45 EST

@RaulPinde. Thank you. I PM’d you with my contact info.

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Joshuak
10/28/2018 20:37 EST

What I am referring to in regards to "burning your Bridges" is do not sell all property and quit all health insurance back in US for at least a year. When you retire, I assume you will be eligible for Medicare ? If so, there are some national "Medicare Advantage" plans available in most locations in the US that also have emergency coverage outside the US up to a certain USD limit such as $50,000 and in some cases higher limits. Most of these specify you must not be away for longer than 6 months, but having a plan that costs nothing (In many locations) is sure worth coming back in 6 months for a checkup at your primary care Doc and then going back. It could save you a lot of money as health insurance can be very expensive. There has been US expats that sold everything and then found out they had a medical condition that would not be well handled in Bulgaria and had to move back. Not too long ago there was a family here on the forum that was selling and moving back to western Europe because of a medical situation. I am not sure the number of US expats that might be in Bulgaria South of Burgas, but I do know there are quite a few from the UK. BTW, when you go, you might visit Romania as I spent more time living there than in Bulgaria. My favorite country, and I am Irish- American Dual. Most all the young people in Romania including school children speak English, and cost of living is also very low.

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WBhops
11/17/2018 20:31 EST

American here. Would like to retire early 40’s in Bulgaria. Should have $3,000USD monthly income by then. Will be traveling there in January as a test-run.

Reasons for move:
-USA getting prohibitively expensive
-quality American women are getting hard to find
-I’ve always wanted to live abroad

Can anyone comment on how receptive Bulgarian women are to American men? What age gap is acceptable?

Thanks.

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Joshuak
11/17/2018 23:05 EST

Yes, $3000 monthly could allow you to live OK in Bulgaria. But you better have some large savings to buy property if you decide to stay. Young Bulgarian women would be more than happy to have a "Rich" American as a Husband, But you best find one that is not just looking for your money. Irish guy I know married a Bulgarian Woman, Did not have any children, but had a thriving business. Eventually she divorced him, got his business and he ended up having to move back to Ireland. Told me the reason was because he did not know Bulgarian language she was able to take advantage of him. So better plan on learning their language if you stay there. Romania is also a low cost country. And their language uses Roman alphabet rather than Bulgarian Cyrillic. Easier for you to learn. I liked Romania very much.

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RaulPinde
11/18/2018 08:18 EST

Hello,
My wife and I visited Varna, BG in December four years ago. We had a rental car and traveled a bit up and down the coast.More information is needed to be able to answer your questions with any degree of accuracy.

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WBhops
11/18/2018 08:50 EST

Thank you for your reply. I am also interested in Romania and will visit there on my Bulgaria trip.

Can you speak about any differences you see between Romania and Bulgaria (besides the language/alphabet)?

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trixie1127
11/18/2018 11:39 EST

The best suggestion I have based on the variables given is join Conversation Exchange (dot) com. Post your profile, including your age and your interests, mention you're thinking of moving to BG, and offer to help Bulgarians with their English in exchange for helping you to learn Bulgarian. You will get a lot of requests from Bulgarians of all ages and either gender - pick as many as you like to Skype with and find out answers to your questions while making local friends. The time difference is a nuisance, but it's a great research tool

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Foxinbulgaria
12/9/2018 03:16 EST

Reference your health care. If you live in Bulgaria, use Bulgarian govt health care. Cheap, VERY very cheap. Comprehensive, good doctors.

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Joshuak
12/9/2018 13:12 EST

AMAZING ! A person visits Bulgaria in August 2018 and by December 2018 becomes an "Expert" on Bulgarian Health care and competency of medical establishment in Bulgaria. This may be fine for completely healthy people. But why did several families move back to their respective countries because they could not get the treatments required to survive in Bulgaria ? Please remember, when people retire usually means they are getting elderly and that usually eventually equates with illness. Any person that equates the competency of healthcare in Bulgaria with the UK or US is dreaming. In Bulgaria it is what it is and can provide healthcare for it's citizens with good intent, but if you are from the UK or US and get a serious condition it is a "Roll of the dice" compared with where you came from. "Very cheap" is usually not very good. You get what you pay for.

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Foxinbulgaria
1/10/2019 07:31 EST

Oh dear. I should have posted a bit more.... we have lived half the year in Romania. No special times of the year, going back to uk regularly for a few weeks to a month or two at a time. Works well for us. We use Romanian health care for the normal needs of life., but if our health was somehow in serious jeopardy, we would go home to UK. Our English friends here are of the same mind. We have friends and family in Bulgaria. They do the same: use Bulgarian health care with the knowledge that the NHS is there as a fine back up. I'm sorry you misinterpreted my post as claiming expertise. I based my comment on Romania and Bulgaria being similar in many ways and on the long term reported experiences of friends and family in Bulgaria. I stand by my statement promoting Bulgarian health care as an available and wholly acceptable source of basic needs and emergency care.

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coollaw3
1/10/2019 08:46 EST

First,you must be a permanent resident in order to use a government health system what is far below the world standards.The other option is to buy an expensive international health insurance without guarantee of acceptance.
Second, it is a big difference to go to the UK for emergencies or visit the US for the same reason.
Third,I apologize for my openess,but many Americans would say that a free,social health care in the UK is considered as a jorney to the heaven.
Using the UK public health system is a good experience for people who consider a suicide as a best solution for troubles on the earth.

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Foxinbulgaria
1/10/2019 16:08 EST

Warts and all, the NHS is a brilliant system. No, it isn't 'free': I paid taxes for 40-some years to earn the right to benefit from it. No, it isn't perfect, but I chose my doctor, I get seen the same day I ring for an appointment, and when I was in a terribly car accident, the NHS did a wonderful job of putting me back on the road. It was there for my children's births, it cured my husband's cancer, and it provides everything my daughter needs for her type 1 diabetes. We haven't lost the family home to pay for care and we pay less taxes than many Americans. Going back to England for medical care in the face of some awful health problem is only natural... I spend a lot of time in Eastern Europe, but England is my HOME. I'm so sorry you have a bad opinion of British health care. I think it's wonderful and I have real respect for Bulgaria's health care. No it isn't perfect, no it doesn't have all the whistles and bells available in America or England, but from what I've heard, it isn't bad and it's getting better every year. I just don't see a problem.

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coollaw3
1/10/2019 17:15 EST

Everything is a matter of perception and expectation,of course.
I believe that the "British smile" and Da Vinci robotic procedures performed by untrained Indian doctor are reasons for such opinion regarding the NHS.
Smile:)

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Joshuak
1/10/2019 22:58 EST

Coollaw3: I might suggest to you British healthcare is very good. Sure they have some problems but every country does. Last I knew Britain had a system where one could pick and choose between public and private if you bought insurance. And they are on a par with the many of the better systems in the world. Don't forget, here in the US we have millions with absolutely no healthcare. That does not apply in the UK as all have it. Same in Bulgaria. But each one has it's level of competence. If someone asked me where I would want to have open heart surgery done, and the choices were the UK or Bulgaria, there is no question the answer would be the UK.

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coollaw3
1/11/2019 07:04 EST

Good morning,
I respectfully provide my point of view below:
We need to understand that two issues exist pertinent to this subject:
1.Availability of health care:
In the US people who do not have an insurance are only those who were forced to make such decision mostly because of the Obamacare. I am writing regarding the middle class people who decided not to pay because of prohibitive high cost caused by the above mentioned act.
Not having an insurance does not mean not having a medical care . Local governments and private facilities provide care anyway.
In the US people use Medicaid,combination of Medicaid and Medicare,and Medicare including and not limited to medicare advantage plans and medigap policies.
2.Quality
In the UK R&D almost do not exist in comparison to the US market.
In the UK a ton of unqualified medical practitioners mostly from former colonies are practicing.Please see the last case of the Da Vinci routine surgery performed by an Indian without any experience .
In the US malpractice cases eliminate from the market such individuals.
Hope you agree with the above.
Have a great day.

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Joshuak
1/11/2019 09:22 EST

I understand there is information here in US you are quoting, but it is without question wrong. One British case does not condemn the whole system, nor should you think there are no cases here in US concerning Da Vinci. There were 3 cases in the Tampa area in the past few months. All 3 cases were older experienced American Doctors complaining they did not have enough training. But I think this has gone far enough. It seems a bit strange to debate quality of US and British Healthcare on a Bulgarian Forum. What we were trying to convey was information regarding comparison of healthcare in Bulgaria vs going back home, where ever that might be.. I think we all agree the healthcare system in Bulgaria is quite good for common conditions and illness, but if one needs specialized treatment, back home is the way to go if possible.

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coollaw3
1/11/2019 10:02 EST

True,but common understanding regarding the availability of health care in the US should be properly clarified. In Bulgaria they lack of modern equipment and properly trained personnell what translates in errors in diagnosis.
You said previously "it is what it is"and I agree fully.
In the UK the licensing to practice medicine looks different than in the US as well as verification of qualification. I really prefer to avoid doctors who possibly may cause harm.

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RaulPinde
1/11/2019 11:12 EST

I have seen many posts about health care in BG, UK and, the US. It appears that many of the comments come from people with no knowledge of the US health care system.
First, in the US people over 65 years of age have a social welfare health care system. It is called Medicare. 80% of users are happy with Medicare. Second, Medicaid is for "poor" people in the US and allows individuals to receive very minimal healthcare if they can find a doctor who accepts the state/federally determined payment. There are very few. Third, there are very, very few "free" medical clinics in the US. The notion that Americans view socialized healthcare as a trip to heaven is absurd. Lastly, the reason healthcare premiums went up in the US after the passage of the Affordable Care Act is bc the goal of GOP congress and the president was to kill it by creating political obstacles to accessing insurance policies. Last, lastly, the US healthcare system is bad expensive and disjointed. Look at the world data on quality of care and services. Healthcare in the US is governed by BIG PHARMA and the insurance companies. Different than BG? Of course, it is. Is expat health insurance expensive? My quote was 200 USD a month and 900 USD a year for 1.5 mil USD for the policy including a flight home prn. That, my dear, will be cheaper than Medicare and Medigap insurance when I retire.

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coollaw3
1/11/2019 11:58 EST

First please let me know where can I find a plan for $US 200 per month? I was trying without a success.
It is obvious that the US provides the best quality care in the world.My insurance co,AETNA paid my surgery costs in 100%.
Medicaid is an adequate plan for poor with wide coverage .

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coollaw3
1/11/2019 12:15 EST

I respectfully do not agree with you in full. The health care system is expensive because of the R&D . Please note that other countries rely on american research and development .
I would be glad to know where did you purchase your $200 a month policy.
Hope it is not a secret. BTW the hospital part of the Medicare"part A" is free anyway for all participants.

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RaulPinde
1/11/2019 13:08 EST

You are dreaming if you believe the US Medicaid is adequate healthcare in the US. As I said, VERY, VERY few medical doctors accept the rate of reimbursement bc it is SO LOW. Hence, if you have Medicaid "coverage" you cannot get the care you need and, it covers a very restricted range of services and procedures.

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Mogilamo
1/11/2019 13:27 EST

Well all i can say is thank heavens for the NHS in the uk.
Which provides FREE health care for ALL, hence the reason why the uk has so many health tourists , arriving in droves.
And still recieving free health care.
The NHS is one of the best health care providers in the world.
Employing some of the very best medical staff in the world, some of whom originate from India, Pakistan, China, Iran ,Iraq, and many other parts of the world.
All of whom are highly qualified experts in their own fields.
In the Uk medical staff from other countries have to pass very stringent examinations before they are allowed to practise.
Myself, my wife, and many close relatives and friends owe their lives to the very highly skilled professionals of the health service in the uk.
Bulgaria does offer a very good health care system, my uncle who had heart bypass surgery in the specialist hospital in yambol,
And is very thankfull for the care
He recieved, his contribution was 250lev
His wife had lifesaving surgery in starazagora, again very thankfull for the care she recieved, her contribution was 300lev.
I have recieved emergency treatment myself, after a building accident ,again excellent care and treatment, for very little contributions.
To see a Gp in bg you dont have to wait weeks for an appointment
You just arrive at surgery and wait your turn, any subsequent tests or examinations are carried out with in days. Not weeks or months. I can say this from personal experience.
A lot of senior clinical staff in the NHS are from India and Pakistan.
People who dont have any knowledge about a particular subject should refrain from making comments.
Long live the NHS.
And be kept out of the clutches of the Americans.

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coollaw3
1/11/2019 14:46 EST

Looks like the UK benefits greatly from foreign citizens.

We call it enrichment.
Germans experience enrichment from millions of doctors from Syria.
We may have the same experience from masses of doctors having a picnic by our southern border.
Live long NHS.
Take care:)

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coollaw3
1/12/2019 16:48 EST

ALL hospitals accept medicaid patients in their outpatient departments.

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HenryJeanClaire
11/19/2019 11:33 EST

We are too. Plovdiv seems the best fit so far.

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HenryJeanClaire
11/19/2019 11:58 EST

Here's our take on medical:
I don't really want to be a ninety year old in nursing home attended to by pierced and tattooed luciferians! If I get cancer or ? at 75 to 80 then fine. I'll let it claim me.
I love living a lot! But I also have my Christian faith. When God wants me, I'm going. Rather that than living with tubes going in/out, etc.

I'm not a fan of earthquakes. Bulgaria has several faults with occasional 100 year quakes., but still not as bad as Greece and Albania.
Plotdiv is close to all the places I want to visit across Europe. It's a perfect home base to launch annual trips from, only 200 miles north east of Mt Athos.

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HenryJeanClaire
11/19/2019 12:07 EST

Why buy at 60yo? We're leaving everything behind and only taking two suitcases.

Has anyone considered Merida Mexico? It's as affordable as Plotdiv Bulgaria but has 100 degree summers with 100% humidity, killer honey bees and Chagus disease. Would rather cold winters than scorching hot summers.

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WBhops
11/19/2019 17:30 EST

Yes. 38 year old American here. LOVE Bulgaria. In my opinion it has the world’s best combination of cost of living and standard of living.

The downsides of the ridiculously difficult language and inconsistent visa policies have me also looking at Colombia and Peru.

If I do Bulgaria it will be Plovdiv or Veliko Tirnovo.

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coollaw3
11/19/2019 17:45 EST

May I ask why Bulgaria?
What do you do in States ?
Do you have a Slavic roots and unemployed/undereducated here?No intention to offend,just analyzing.Thank you.

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WBhops
11/19/2019 21:01 EST

For me, Bulgaria has the best combo of standard of living and cost of living. I like the look of Bulgarian women. They are more traditional compared to American women. The food is clean and healthy. Great scenery and mountains. I can retire in Bulgaria right now at 38 due to low costs.

Lots to like about Bulgaria.

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coollaw3
11/20/2019 06:57 EST

Can you be more specific?
Bulgarian women?Oops,do not be so fast with your judgment.Plesse read previous post about the Irishman who lost everything as a result of his choice.??

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tay709
11/20/2019 07:30 EST

I am English with a Russian wife and have had property in Bulgaria for over 15 years now, and in that time i have seen many changes in the Bulgarian People and the authorities and its attitudes towards Expats, we are now being singled out by the Bulgarian Authorities to squeeze us for additional taxes for absolutely everything they can think of from driving a car to keeping a dog and the Bulgarian People also now have the attitude that they should squeeze and bleed us dry they are unreliable and not an honest people with little or no education and a thirst for getting cash for doing shoddy work, if you come to Bulgaria you will need to be in a close Expat environment so you have someone to turn too for help and its getting worse ! ! !

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coollaw3
11/20/2019 10:32 EST

There we go!

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Joshuak
11/20/2019 15:54 EST

If the only thing one is interested in is the cost of living there are cheaper countries one can move to. Try Republic of Georgia, or Ukraine. But be careful what you wish for !!!!!

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coollaw3
11/20/2019 17:12 EST

:)buahaha

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Culture-Shock-in-Veliko-TarnovoAn Expat Talks about Culture Shock & Living in Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria

An expat in Veliko Tarnovo, one of Bulgaria's oldest cities, describes the challenges he faced adjusting to life in Bulgaria. He explains that the Bulgarians may not seem to smile and be happy at first, but once you get to know them they're very hospitable.

An expat in Veliko Tarnovo, one of Bulgaria's oldest cities, describes the challenges he faced adjusting to life in Bulgaria. He explains that the Bulgarians may not seem to smile and be happy at fir...

7-Things-to-Know-Before-You-Move-to-BulgariaMoving to Bulgaria: 7 Things to Know Before You Move to Bulgaria

Expats who move to Bulgaria have a wide variety of options to choose from in terms of where to live. Whether you want to live off the grid, in the mountains, or by the sea, it's all there to be had as long as you do the appropriate research and understand some of the unique aspects of successfully moving to Bulgaria.

Expats who move to Bulgaria have a wide variety of options to choose from in terms of where to live. Whether you want to live off the grid, in the mountains, or by the sea, it's all there to be had a...

10-Tips-for-Living-in-Bulgaria10 Tips for Living in Bulgaria

Expats living in Bulgaria can have all kinds of experiences while living abroad there. The capital city of Sofia offers a much different experience compared to what expats will experience in a Bulgarian village. These tips will help you understand what it means to live as an expat in Bulgaria.

Expats living in Bulgaria can have all kinds of experiences while living abroad there. The capital city of Sofia offers a much different experience compared to what expats will experience in a Bulgar...

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