Expat Exchange
Free MembershipSign In

Living in Martinique

By Betsy Burlingame

Last updated on Feb 10, 2022

Summary: Expats, digital nomads and retirees talk about what it is really like living in Martinique. They offer advice about meeting people, cost of living, finding a home and more.

AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers

Is the cost of living in Martinique high?

We asked people about the cost of living in Martinique, they wrote:

"The cost of living is always two to three times the basic amount. It's like living in New York, California, or London. The cost of living seems very high," added one expat living in Schoelcher.

"The cost of living in Martinique can be extremely high depending on what your pockets are reaching for. But, if your more into simplicity and minimalist living, then there shouldn't be much problem settling in. Rent can be high, but the views of the island mountains are priceless," commented one expat who moved to Fort-de-France.

Answer this Question

What type of recreational facilities are in Martinique?

When we asked people living in Martinique about recreational activities, they mentioned:

"People generally go to the beach. There's a zoo, hiking activities, movie theater, large garden and a few other tourist attractions you can participate in. But not really too much to do," commented one expat living in Schoelcher, Martinique.

"You can find soccer fields randomly around the area as well as basket ball. Swimming and hiking seems to be the most go to sport. As long with biking and jogging. Fit ess clubs including the well known curves are also available throughout the island," remarked another expat living in Fort-de-France.

Answer this Question

What is the weather like in Martinique?

"Rain. Heat. Humidity. That's the basic weather in martinique. Always take an umbrella," said one expat living in Schoelcher.

"Temperatures can range from extraordinarily hot, to cool. Of course rainy days are constant. And even the dry season can seem wet. Sometime you may feel an earthquake or two. But, keep and umbrella or rain jacket with you for just in case and everything should be fine," mentioned another expat inFort-de-France.

Answer this Question

Are there good restaurants in Martinique?

"There isn't much to do at night. Most restaurants are closed, except for a few that are open in Fort de France. You may find random food trucks. And people go for walks in the city. But night life isn't the biggest attraction," remarked another expat in Schoelcher.

"Restaurants serve various dishes, including the islands Caribbean meals and pizza. McDonald's is a choice as well as Burger King and KFC. But the prices are expensive and there's no dollar menus. But, plenty of small shops to eat at! Lots of different foods to taste make the shops worth the hassle," added one expat living in Fort-de-France.

Answer this Question

Where will I buy groceries and do other shopping in Martinique?

"Most people shop at hyper u, carrefour, and leader price. There aren't many corner stores near by - meaning it's really rare to see one. Stores open at 830 and close at 6. Hyper you gives you the extended time and closes at 830. Hyper is the only store open on Sunday until 12," mentioned another expat living in Schoelcher.

"It is true that stores close by six no later than 8. And only one store Hyper U is open on Sunday. Other groceries like Carrefour and Leader Price open until 6 Monday through Friday, and 12 pm on Saturday. Sometimes you may find a corner store open. Or some small shops may be open in the city. Most bakeries are closed after six, except the one in Terre Saint Ville, but the rough neighborhood may keep tourists or newcomers away," said an expat in Fort-de-France.

Answer this Question

What are the visa & residency requirements in Martinique?

"Be sure you have your visa to stay before you come. Long stay visa are your ticket here. Do things legally and there should be no problems. Carte de séjour, take time, and that can be real hassle! You must either have a job, or family member here to to stay. Be sure your fully prepared," mentioned another expat inSchoelcher.

"Visa requirements are needed for long stays and and most depend on where you are from. The prefecture can take time, but everyone's situation is different. There is no American embassy, yet there are representatives from time. To time here. Paper work can seem like years on months. But the process isn't too difficult," commented one expat who moved to Fort-de-France, Martinique.

Answer this Question

About the Author

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.

William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance

Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
GET A QUOTE

William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance

Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
GET A QUOTE

Contribute to Martinique Network Contribute
Help others in Martinique by answering questions about the challenges and adventures of living in Martinique.

AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers

Copyright 1997-2022 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal