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Cost of Living in Zug

If you're moving to Zug, understanding the the cost of living in Zug helps you know what to expect when it comes to apartment or house hunting, grocery shopping, transportation, dining out, utilities and more.
|-Cost of Living in Zug

Apartment Rentals Rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center of Zug is around 1,500 CHF (1,400 USD) per month. Rent for a three-bedroom apartment in the city center is around 2,500 CHF (2,300 USD) per month. Rent for a one-bedroom apartment outside the city center is around 1,200 CHF (1,100 USD) per month. Rent for a three-bedroom apartment outside the city center is around 2,000 CHF (1,800 USD).
Apartment Purchases The average price of a one-bedroom apartment in the city center of Zug is around 500,000 CHF (460,000 USD). The average price of a three-bedroom apartment in the city center is around 800,000 CHF (740,000 USD). The average price of a one-bedroom apartment outside the city center is around 400,000 CHF (370,000 USD). The average price of a three-bedroom apartment outside the city center is around 600,000 CHF (560,000 USD).
Transportation Public transportation in Zug is very efficient and affordable. A single ticket costs around 3 CHF (2.70 USD). A monthly pass costs around 70 CHF (65 USD). Taxis are also available and the cost of a 5 km (3 mi) ride is around 25 CHF (23 USD).
Groceries The cost of groceries in Zug is slightly higher than in other parts of Switzerland. A liter of milk costs around 1.50 CHF (1.40 USD). A loaf of bread costs around 3 CHF (2.70 USD). A dozen eggs costs around 5 CHF (4.50 USD). A kilogram of local cheese costs around 15 CHF (14 USD).
Restaurants The cost of eating out in Zug is slightly higher than in other parts of Switzerland. A meal at an inexpensive restaurant costs around 25 CHF (23 USD). A three-course meal for two at a mid-range restaurant costs around 80 CHF (73 USD). A cappuccino costs around 4 CHF (3.60 USD).
Utilities The cost of utilities in Zug is slightly higher than in other parts of Switzerland. The average monthly cost of electricity, heating, water, and garbage for a 85m2 (900 sqft) apartment is around 150 CHF (140 USD). The average monthly cost of internet is around 50 CHF (45 USD).
Private School Tuition The cost of private school tuition in Zug is higher than in other parts of Switzerland. The average annual tuition for preschool is around 10,000 CHF (9,200 USD). The average annual tuition for elementary school is around 15,000 CHF (14,000 USD). The average annual tuition for middle school is around 20,000 CHF (18,400 USD). The average annual tuition for high school is around 25,000 CHF (23,000 USD).

Monthly Budget for Retirees in Zug

“Yes, the cost of living in Zug is generally considered high compared to other locations,” said one expat living in Switzerland.

“The cost of living in Zug is generally considered to be high. Prices for basic necessities such as food, housing, and transportation are all more expensive than in many other parts of the world. However, the high salaries and low taxes in Zug make it an attractive place to live for many people. Additionally, the city offers a high quality of life with excellent infrastructure, a safe environment, and a wide range of cultural activities,” wrote a member in Switzerland.

Can I live in Zug on $1,500 a month?

“I’ve been living in Zug for a while now, and I can tell you that living on $1,500 a month as an expat can be quite challenging, especially if you’re used to modern amenities. However, it’s not impossible if you’re willing to make some sacrifices and adjustments to your lifestyle.Firstly, you’ll need to find affordable accommodation. The city center and neighborhoods like Zug West and Baar are quite expensive, so you might want to consider living in more affordable areas like Steinhausen, Cham, or H├╝nenberg. These neighborhoods are a bit further from the city center, but they offer more affordable housing options. You can find a small apartment or a shared flat in these areas for around $800 to $1,000 per month.Next, you’ll need to cut down on eating out and entertainment expenses. Eating out in Zug can be quite pricey, so you’ll need to cook most of your meals at home. You can save money by shopping at discount supermarkets like Aldi and Lidl, and by buying seasonal produce at local farmers’ markets. For entertainment, you can take advantage of the beautiful nature and outdoor activities that Switzerland has to offer, like hiking, biking, and swimming in the lake during the summer months.Transportation costs can also add up quickly, so you might want to consider using public transportation instead of owning a car. Zug has a good public transportation system, and you can save money by purchasing a monthly or annual pass. If you need to travel to other cities in Switzerland, you can take advantage of the Swiss Travel Pass, which offers unlimited travel on trains, buses, and boats for a fixed price.Lastly, you’ll need to be mindful of your overall spending and prioritize your expenses. You might have to cut back on shopping for clothes, gadgets, and other non-essential items. You can also save money by using local services like libraries and community centers instead of paying for expensive gym memberships or other recreational activities.In conclusion, living comfortably on $1,500 a month in Zug is possible, but it requires some sacrifices and adjustments to your lifestyle. By finding affordable accommodation, cooking at home, using public transportation, and being mindful of your spending, you can make it work,” commented an expat living in Switzerland.

Can I live in Zug on $3,500 a month?

“I’ve been living in Zug for a while now, and I can tell you that it’s definitely possible to live comfortably on $3,000 a month, but you’ll have to make some sacrifices. First, you’ll need to find a more affordable neighborhood to live in. Zug is known for being quite expensive, so you’ll want to avoid areas like the city center or the lakefront, where rents can be very high. Instead, consider looking for an apartment in neighborhoods like Baar, Steinhausen, or Cham. These areas are still close to the city center but are more affordable.Next, you’ll need to be mindful of your spending on groceries and dining out. Eating out in Zug can be quite expensive, so try to cook at home as much as possible. Shop at discount grocery stores like Aldi or Lidl, and make use of local markets for fresh produce. When you do eat out, look for more affordable options like kebab shops or pizzerias.Transportation can also be a significant expense in Switzerland, so consider using public transportation instead of owning a car. The public transportation system in Zug is excellent, and you can get a monthly pass for around $100. This will give you unlimited access to buses and trains within the canton of Zug.As for entertainment and leisure activities, there are plenty of free or low-cost options in Zug. Take advantage of the beautiful nature surrounding the city by going for hikes, bike rides, or swimming in the lake during the summer months. There are also many free events and festivals throughout the year, so keep an eye out for those.In summary, living comfortably on $3,000 a month in Zug is possible, but you’ll need to be mindful of your spending and make some sacrifices. By choosing a more affordable neighborhood, cooking at home, using public transportation, and enjoying free or low-cost activities, you can make it work,” said one expat living in Switzerland.

Can I live in Zug on $5,000 a month?

“I’ve been living in Zug for a few years now, and I can tell you that it’s definitely possible to live comfortably on $5,000 a month, but you’ll need to make some adjustments and sacrifices. First, you’ll want to look for housing in more affordable neighborhoods, like Baar or Steinhausen. These areas are still close to the city center and have good public transportation connections, but the rent is more reasonable compared to the more expensive neighborhoods like Zug Old Town or Zugerberg.When it comes to groceries and dining out, you’ll need to be more mindful of your spending. Eating out can be quite expensive in Zug, so try to cook at home more often and take advantage of the local supermarkets like Migros and Coop for your groceries. If you do want to eat out, look for more affordable options like pizzerias or kebab shops.Transportation can also be a significant expense, so consider getting a monthly public transportation pass to save on commuting costs. If you’re working in Zug, you might even be able to walk or bike to work, which will save you even more money.As for entertainment and leisure activities, there are plenty of free or low-cost options in Zug. You can enjoy the beautiful Lake Zug and its surrounding parks, or take advantage of the many hiking and biking trails in the area. There are also several museums and cultural events throughout the year that offer discounted or free admission.In terms of sacrifices, you might have to give up some of the more luxurious amenities you’re used to, like a large apartment or frequent nights out at high-end restaurants. However, with some careful budgeting and planning, you can still enjoy a comfortable and fulfilling life in Zug on $5,000 a month,” commented an expat living in Switzerland.

Joshua WoodJoshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

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