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Cost of Living in Punta del Diablo

If you're moving to Punta del Diablo, understanding the the cost of living in Punta del Diablo helps you know what to expect when it comes to apartment or house hunting, grocery shopping, transportation, dining out, utilities and more.
|-Cost of Living in Punta del Diablo

Apartment Rentals Apartment rentals in Punta del Diablo are relatively inexpensive. A one-bedroom apartment in the city center can cost around $400 USD per month. A two-bedroom apartment in the city center can cost around $500 USD per month. Outside of the city center, prices can be even lower.
Apartment Purchases Apartment purchases in Punta del Diablo, Uruguay can be quite expensive. A one-bedroom apartment in the city center can cost around $100,000 USD. A two-bedroom apartment in the city center can cost around $150,000 USD. Outside of the city center, prices can be even lower.
Transportation Public transportation in Punta del Diablo, Uruguay is relatively inexpensive. A one-way bus ticket costs around $1 USD. Taxis are also available and can cost around $5 USD for a short ride. Renting a car is also an option and can cost around $30 USD per day.
Groceries Groceries in Punta del Diablo, Uruguay are relatively inexpensive. A loaf of bread can cost around $1 USD. A liter of milk can cost around $2 USD. A kilogram of rice can cost around $3 USD. A kilogram of chicken can cost around $5 USD.
Restaurants Eating out in Punta del Diablo, Uruguay can be quite affordable. A meal at a local restaurant can cost around $10 USD. A meal at a mid-range restaurant can cost around $20 USD. A meal at a high-end restaurant can cost around $30 USD.
Utilities Utilities in Punta del Diablo, Uruguay are relatively inexpensive. A basic package of utilities (electricity, water, and gas) can cost around $50 USD per month. Internet can cost around $30 USD per month. Cable TV can cost around $20 USD per month.
Private School Tuition Private school tuition in Punta del Diablo, Uruguay can be quite expensive. Preschool tuition can cost around $500 USD per month. Elementary school tuition can cost around $1,000 USD per month. Middle school tuition can cost around $1,500 USD per month. High school tuition can cost around $2,000 USD per month.

Monthly Budget for Retirees in Punta del Diablo

“The cost of living in Punta del Diablo is generally considered to be affordable compared to other cities in Uruguay. The cost of basic goods and services is comparable to the rest of the country and is relatively inexpensive compared to other parts of the world,” said one expat living in Punta del Diablo.

“The cost of living in Punta del Diablo, is relatively affordable compared to other popular tourist destinations in the country. Accommodation prices can vary depending on the season, with more affordable options available during the off-peak months. Eating out at local restaurants is reasonably priced, and groceries can be purchased at local markets for a lower cost. Public transportation is limited, but affordable, and many people choose to walk or rent bicycles to get around. Overall, Punta del Diablo offers a laid-back and budget-friendly lifestyle for both tourists and residents,” wrote a member in Punta del Diablo.

Can I live in Punta del Diablo on $1,500 a month?

“I’ve been living in Punta del Diablo for a while now, and I can tell you that it’s possible to live comfortably on $1,500 a month, but you’ll have to make some sacrifices. First, you’ll need to find a place to live that’s affordable. I recommend looking for a rental in neighborhoods like Barrio Rivero or Barrio San Martin, where you can find a small house or apartment for around $500 to $700 a month. Avoid neighborhoods like Playa de la Viuda or Playa Grande, as they tend to be more expensive.Next, you’ll need to be mindful of your utility bills. Electricity and water can be quite expensive here, so try to conserve energy and water as much as possible. Also, consider using a prepaid cell phone plan instead of a monthly contract to save on communication costs.When it comes to groceries, shopping at local markets and buying in-season produce can help you save money. Eating out can be quite expensive, so try to cook at home as much as possible. If you do want to treat yourself to a meal out, there are some affordable options like local empanada shops or parrillas (grill houses) where you can get a decent meal for around $10.Transportation is another area where you can save money. Punta del Diablo is a small town, so you can easily walk or bike to most places. If you need to travel to nearby towns or cities, consider using the local bus system, which is quite affordable.Finally, you’ll need to be mindful of your entertainment expenses. Going out for drinks or to a club can be pricey, so try to find more affordable ways to have fun, like going to the beach, hiking in the nearby national park, or attending local events and festivals.Overall, living in Punta del Diablo on $1,500 a month is doable, but you’ll need to be conscious of your spending and make some sacrifices in order to make it work,” commented an expat living in Punta del Diablo.

Can I live in Punta del Diablo on $3,500 a month?

“I’ve been living in Punta del Diablo for a while now, and I can tell you that it’s definitely possible to live comfortably on $3,000 a month, even if you’re used to modern amenities. However, there are some sacrifices you’ll have to make to ensure you stay within your budget.Firstly, you’ll need to be mindful of where you choose to live. Some neighborhoods can be quite expensive, so I’d recommend looking into more affordable areas like Barrio Rivero or Barrio Parque del Plata. These neighborhoods are still close to the beach and have a nice community feel, but the cost of living is more reasonable compared to more upscale areas like Playa Grande or La Viuda.In terms of housing, you might have to settle for a smaller or older home, as newer and larger properties can be quite pricey. However, you can still find some great options that offer modern amenities and a comfortable living space.When it comes to transportation, owning a car can be expensive due to import taxes and high gas prices. I’d recommend using public transportation or even renting a scooter or bike to get around town. This will not only save you money but also allow you to enjoy the beautiful scenery and laid-back atmosphere of Punta del Diablo.Eating out can also be a bit pricey, especially in the more touristy areas. To save money, I’d suggest cooking at home more often and shopping at local markets for fresh produce and groceries. You can still enjoy the local cuisine by eating out occasionally, but being mindful of your spending will help you stay within your budget.Lastly, while there are plenty of activities and entertainment options in Punta del Diablo, some can be quite expensive. To save money, I’d recommend taking advantage of the many free or low-cost activities available, such as hiking, beach days, and exploring the local art scene.Overall, living in Punta del Diablo on $3,000 a month is doable, but it requires some adjustments and sacrifices. By being mindful of your spending and choosing more affordable options, you can still enjoy a comfortable and fulfilling lifestyle in this beautiful coastal town,” said one expat living in Punta del Diablo.

Can I live in Punta del Diablo on $5,000 a month?

“I’ve been living in Punta del Diablo for a while now, and I can tell you that it’s definitely possible to live comfortably on $5,000 a month, even if you’re used to modern amenities. However, there might be some sacrifices you’ll have to make to ensure you stay within your budget.Firstly, you’ll want to avoid the more expensive neighborhoods like Playa de la Viuda and Playa Grande. These areas tend to have higher rental prices and are more geared towards tourists, so the cost of living can be higher. Instead, consider looking for a place in Barra del Chuy or Santa Isabel, which are more affordable and still offer a good quality of life.One sacrifice you might have to make is adjusting to the slower pace of life in Punta del Diablo. This small fishing village doesn’t have the same level of infrastructure and amenities as a big city, so you might find that things like internet speeds and public transportation options are more limited. However, this can also be a positive aspect, as it allows you to enjoy a more relaxed and laid-back lifestyle.Another thing to consider is that while there are some modern amenities available, they might not be as easily accessible or as high-quality as you’re used to. For example, you might have to travel a bit further to find a well-stocked grocery store or a gym with all the equipment you need. However, this can also be an opportunity to explore local markets and try out new activities like surfing or horseback riding.In terms of healthcare, there are local clinics and pharmacies available, but for more specialized care, you might need to travel to a larger city like Montevideo. It’s a good idea to have a solid health insurance plan in place to cover any potential medical expenses.Overall, living in Punta del Diablo on $5,000 a month is definitely doable, but it will require some adjustments and sacrifices. However, the beautiful beaches, friendly locals, and laid-back atmosphere make it a great place to call home,” commented an expat living in Punta del Diablo.

Joshua WoodJoshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

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