×
Interested in our Partner Program for businesses or our Local Guide Program for experienced expats and digital nomads? Click here to learn more.
Expat Exchange - Moving to Poland with a Pet
Expat Exchange
Free MembershipSign In
Bydgoszcz, Poland


Moving to Poland with a Pet

By Betsy Burlingame

GeoBlue
GeoBlue

Summary: Planning to move to Poland with your pet? Get all the vital information on required vaccinations, pet travel guidelines, and prohibited items in Poland. Make your relocation process easier with this guide.

Moving to a new country can be a thrilling adventure, and for those who consider their pets as part of the family, ensuring their furry friends can come along is a top priority. Poland is becoming an increasingly popular destination for expats and digital nomads, and the good news is that it is quite pet-friendly. Most pets, including dogs and cats, can accompany you to Poland, provided you adhere to the country's entry requirements. This includes having the correct vaccinations, paperwork, and understanding the regulations surrounding the import of animals. While quarantine is not typically required for pets entering Poland from within the EU, there are specific steps you must follow to ensure a smooth transition. It's not uncommon to see pets in Poland, and you'll find that many Poles are pet owners themselves. However, before you pack your pet's suitcase, let's delve into the details of what you need to know about bringing your pet to Poland.

Can I bring my dog to Poland?

Yes, you can bring your dog to Poland. Dogs are welcome, but they must meet certain health and documentation requirements. Your dog will need to be microchipped, have a valid rabies vaccination, and be accompanied by an EU pet passport if traveling from within the EU, or a health certificate if coming from outside the EU. It's important to ensure that all documentation is up to date and in compliance with Polish regulations.

Can I bring my cat to Poland?

Similar to dogs, cats can also be brought into Poland. The requirements for cats are much like those for dogs: they must be microchipped, have a current rabies vaccination, and have the proper documentation, such as an EU pet passport or a veterinary health certificate. As long as these conditions are met, your feline friend should have no trouble entering Poland with you.

Pets that are Prohibited from Coming into Poland

Poland follows the EU's regulations regarding the import of pets, which means that most household pets like dogs, cats, and ferrets are allowed. However, certain breeds of dogs that are considered dangerous may be subject to restrictions or bans. Additionally, exotic animals such as some reptiles, birds, and rodents may require special permits or may be prohibited altogether. It's essential to check the latest regulations before planning your move, as these can change and may vary depending on the species and country of origin.

How do I bring my pet to Poland?

To bring your pet to Poland, you'll need to prepare well in advance. The process includes ensuring your pet has a microchip that complies with ISO 11784/11785 standards, a valid rabies vaccination administered after the microchip has been implanted, and the appropriate documentation. For pets coming from within the EU, an EU pet passport is required. For those coming from outside the EU, a health certificate issued by an authorized veterinarian within 10 days of travel is necessary. Additionally, you should check if there are any additional treatments or vaccinations required based on your country of origin. There is no mandatory quarantine for pets arriving from EU countries and most non-EU countries, provided all conditions are met. However, pets may be subject to inspection upon arrival.

Upon Arriving in Poland

Once you and your pet have arrived in Poland, there are a few things you need to do to settle in. While there is no specific pet license required in Poland, you should register your pet with a local veterinarian and inform yourself about local regulations, such as leash laws and areas where pets are not allowed. Finding a veterinarian is straightforward, as there are many clinics across the country. Poles generally like dogs and cats, and you'll find that there are dog parks and pet-friendly areas in most cities. It's also a good idea to familiarize yourself with the nearest emergency vet services and any local pet stores for supplies. With a bit of preparation, you and your pet can look forward to a happy and comfortable life in Poland.

About the Author

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.


GeoBlue
GeoBlue

GeoBlue
GeoBlue

Bydgoszcz, Poland

William Russell
William Russell

Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
Get Quote

William RussellWilliam Russell

Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
Get Quote

Contribute to Poland Network Contribute
Help others in Poland by answering questions about the challenges and adventures of living in Poland.

GeoBlue
GeoBlue

Copyright 1997-2024 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal Partners & Local Guides